2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Jun 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

Political Science

Courses may be classified as follows:

Corequisites: POL 201 , POL 203  

Major Core: POL 302 , POL 497  

  1. Political Theory: POL 313 , POL 314 , POL 315 , POL 316 , POL 317  
  2. American Politics: POL 320, POL 323 , POL 324 , POL 325 , POL 326 , POL 327 , POL 328 , POL 329 , POL 332 , POL 333  
  3. Policy and Administration: POL 380 , POL 381 , POL 382 , POL 383  
  4. International Politics: POL 331 , POL 362 , POL 364 , POL 365 , POL 366 , POL 368  
  5. Comparative Politics: POL 341 , POL 346 , POL 347 , POL 348  
  6. Scope & Statistics: POL 301 , POL 305  
  7. Special Topics, Seminars, Internships, & Independent Studies: POL 336 , POL 385 , POL 483 , POL 484 , POL 491 , POL 492 , POL 499  

  
  •  

    POL 333 - The Politics of Non-Violence


    The Twentieth Century was the most violent in recorded human history. Two catastrophic world wars, the rise of totalitarian regimes, the Holocaust, the manifest destructive powers and subsequent proliferation of nuclear weapons of mass destruction, and the Cold War (or numerous “proxy” wars between the superpowers in resource-rich developing countries) resulted in millions of deaths. But the most violent century also bore remarkable efforts by men and women to resist these brutalizations, critique violent methodologies, and struggle for alternative methods of political persuasion. This course will explore Twentieth Century theories, practices and dilemmas of nonviolent resistance and transformative struggle. It will encourage examination of questions of means and ends, use of violence and expressions of nonviolence, social justice, and methods of fighting injustice without creating more injustice.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 334 - American Politics in Film


    This course uses the medium of film to help students of politics understand the nature of American government and politics. The course uses a mixture of films and film genres to explore various aspects of the American political system and to assess how these have been covered and dramatized by movies and television. In particular, the course addresses issues arising from the portrayal of American framers, institutions, politicians, campaigns, elections, leadership, opinion, as well as key policy issues and important historical/political events.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 335 - Famous Political Trials


    An examination of the famous political trials in American and European history (from Ancient times through the 20th C.). In addition to looking at the history, politics, and legal issues surrounding these trials, the class also considers questions such as: What are the fundamental elements of political trials? How have scholars sought to distinguish between various types of political trials? What role did the trial play in public discourse at the time as well as later? How did the trial crystallize certain political and social issues of its time? How did/does the trial operate in terms of spectacle and drama? How does legal reasoning and literary narrative or storytelling interact in these trials? What conflicts emerge in the trials between individuals and the state, the church and the state, and actors in public and private arenas? How do the trials contribute or detract from public discourse? And what lessons can be learned from these trials?
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 336 - Contemporary American Politics


    An analysis of the emerging patterns, behaviors, issues, controversies, debates, and challenges integral to contemporary American government and politics. Attention is directed to major constitutional, political challenges and controversies of the day as determined by faculty/instructor. Examples include: the role of the media, electoral and campaign reform, radical individualism, the impact of separation of powers, etc. The goal of the course is to give students a deeper appreciation of the political context in which governmental decisions are made, a better understanding of the process of constitutional adjudication, and a clearer sense of the constitutional, political, and ethical principles involved in these controversies.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 337 - Gender and Politics


    This course examines the role of gender in American politics. The word, gender, includes more than biological differences between men and women, and includes how the public interprets these differences and values some qualities over others. Elections are highly gendered, how we interpret political behavior is influenced strongly by gendered language (metaphors of war and professional sports), and our expectations about the characteristics, behavior, and appearance of political actors are shaped by gender. Current research on gender differences in seeking public office, and the influence of gender on the political behavior of elected officials will be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 341 - Comparative Politics: The Western World


    An introduction to the study of comparative politics with emphasis on Britain and Western Europe. Comparison is made with American and non-Western systems and consideration is given to general concepts and tools of analysis.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 346 - The Third World: Politics and Development


    This  course examines the political and economic contexts for development. The course explores pathways and options for growth and and the changing understandings of human development.  In addition the course examines key issues including the political economy of north-south relations, urbanization, trade, health, critical institutions, and globalization.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 347 - Comparative Politics: The Non-Western World


    Description and analysis of the structure and process of government in various non-Western governments, including Latin America. Theoretical frameworks of structure-functionalism, modernization and dependency theory will be examined to be used in explaining the political system under discussion. Emphasis will be placed on the formal and informal structure of power, on the role of political groups and on the influence of economic, military, religious and ethnic forces.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 348 - Politics Ldrshp Mod South Asia


    An introduction to the politics and leadership of modern South Asia. The course focuses, in particular, although not exclusively on the first half of the twentieth century, although it may be necessary to go back to at least the mid-1850’s to put in context the period from British colonial rule to the struggle for independence, and the partition of India and Pakistan in 1947. The primary focus is partition, independence, and the two-state solution; all of which are critical to understanding the current state and politics of the subcontinent today.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in the Fall Semester
    Written Intensive
  
  •  

    POL 362 - International Relations


    Major theories and recent theoretical approaches to the study of international relations. The evolution of the nation-state system. Basic factors affecting the power positions and policies of states. Conceptions of national interest and national security. The formulation, instruments and patterns of foreign policy. Conflict and cooperation among states through law, diplomacy, international organization and war.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    POL 364 - International Law and Organizations


    Based largely on the study of cases, the course examines the nature, sources, development, principles and application of the rules that govern the legal relationships among members of the modern state system. Emphasis will be placed on the role of international law in world politics and on contemporary problems of enforcement and further development. The course will also focus on the role of key organizations such as the United Nations, The World Trade Organization and the International Criminal Court.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 365 - Contemporary Global Politics


    An analysis of the emerging patterns in recent international behavior. Attention directed to the bipolar and post-bipolar international system; East-West conflict and cooperation; the Third World and non-commitment; international economics; arms and disarmament; world order under law.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 366 - International Politics and Film


    This course is designed to use the medium of film to explain and discuss important topics in international politics. Film provides a window to the world and this course will explore how various aspects of international politics have been covered and dramatized by movies and television. The course will focus on how international political processes, institutions and leaders have been portrayed on screen and what those renderings say about political decisions, ideologies and actions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 368 - Environmental Politics


    This course is designed to introduce you to the basic issues, concepts, and theories of environmental politics. We will examine the major debates and problems in the field, significant events inspiring change in the international system, and the relevance of the debates to current events. Among the most important issues will be sustainable development, security, and international governance.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 370 - Human Rights


    This course is designed to introduce you to the basic issues, concepts, and theories of human rights. The course will examine the major debates in both the domestic and international context paying particular attention to key contemporary problems regarding the rights of children, women, refugees, and others.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 371 - Politics of Global Health


    An exploration of the political controversies surrounding global public health, with a special emphasis on poverty and development. This course looks at how the world cooperates to confront the most persistent global health emergencies, such as HIV/AIDS, maternal health, tuberculosis or malaria. Multilateral institutions including the UN system and World Bank figure prominently, as do the perspectives of developing countries.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 372 - Environmental Law


    This course provides a broad, practical understanding of some important federal environmental statutes and case law. The course is designed to introduce you to the fascinating variety of important environmental challenges addressed by environmental laws, the difficult policy issues surrounding environmental problems, and the legal complexities of environmental regulation and administration.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    POL 373 - Global Cities and the Environment


    This course explores the interrelationship between the world’s cities and the global environment in an era of rapid urbanization, resource depletion and climate change. It critically engages the economic, cultural, architectural, and aesthetic dimensions of global urbanization as rapidly expanding cities confront ecological limitations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    POL 380 - American Bureaucracy: The Administration of Public Policy


    The study of executive branch organization in American government and the role of the “fourth branch”- full time executive departments and agencies - in administering and shaping the substance of public policies. Analysis of public administrative hierarchy, leadership, personnel, expertise, operating procedures and sources of bureaucratic power from political, legal, and managerial perspectives.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 381 - Administrative Law


    The study of the actions of executive branch departments and agencies, political and legal constraints on bureaucratic power, the legal sources and practical effects of regulatory rules and regulations, the power to investigate and enforce rules, and due process rights of individuals and corporations affected by public administrative actions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 382 - Public Personnel Administration


    Analysis of the organization and management of the public workforce in the executive branch, the civil service, labor-management relations and dispute-resolution procedures, organization theory, comparative leadership studies in the public and private sectors, career versus political executives, and current challenges facing public managers and employees.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 383 - The Public Policy Process


    Study of the dynamics of the policy -making process - what governments do, how decisions are implemented, why some policy alternatives are pursued over others. Analysis of interactions among those demanding change in policy, those with authority to make decisions, those afected by the policy, and pressures outside government seeking reform of policy.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 385 - Pre Law Internship


    Internship in a cooperating private law office, in the legal department of a cooperating corporation or with a government agency such as a district attorney’s office, etc. Conferences with the Pre-Law Coordinator and research reports will supplement the student’s practical experience. This course is open to any student with the approval of the department chair. Preference will be given to Pre-Law minors if positions are limited.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    POL 483 - Internship in Political Science


    Internship in cooperating governmental or other agency under supervision of a faculty committee. The processes of government, internal operations, political, organizational and environmental influences on the operations of various agencies will be studied. Conferences with designated faculty members and research reports will supplement the student’s practical experience in government.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    POL 484 - Internship in Political Science


    Internship in cooperating governmental or other agency under supervision of a faculty committee. The process of government, internal operations, political, organizational and environmental influences on the operations of various agencies will be studied. Conferences with designated faculty members and research reports will supplement the student’s practical experience in government.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    POL 491 - Special Topics in Political Science


    Intensive study opportunities in areas of specialization not covered in depth by existing courses. Special topics may include: Public Opinion, Terrorism, Identity Politics, Political Protest Movements. Students may take more than one special topics course.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    POL 492 - Special Topics in Political Science


    Intensive study opportunities in areas of specialization not covered in depth by existing courses. Special topics may include: Public Opinion, Terrorism, Identity Politics, Political Protest Movements. Students may take more than one special topics course.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 497 - Capstone in Political Science


    Research and readings in selected topics and problems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: POL 201 , POL 203 , POL 302 , senior status and approval of the department chair
    Capstone Course. Oral & Written Intensive. Open to Seniors Only. Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    POL 499 - Independent Reading and Research


    A supervised course of study concentrating on a specific topic approved by a faculty advisor. Student and advisor meet on a regular basis for purposes of guidance and the submission of progress reports.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing
    Open to Seniors Only Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required

Psychology

  
  •  

    CDS 1111 - Human Sexuality: Fact and Fallacy


    A course dealing with myths and realities about human sexuality. The following topics will be explored: anatomy and psychology, conception and birth, gender roles, sexual behavior, marriage, love, coercive sexual behavior, and sexually transmitted diseases.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered in the Fall Semester Weekend Intensive
  
  •  

    DAA 3001 - Introduction to Drug and Alcohol Abuse Studies


    A study of the biological, psychological and sociological aspects of drug and alcohol abuse and addiction. An emphasis on the psycho-pharmacology of commonly abused substances, the disease concept of chemical dependency and an overview of substance abuse problems in the family, school and industry.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Not Open to Freshmen
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    DAA 3011 - Assessment, Referral and Treatment Methods


    A study of the process of appraisal and evaluation of the chemical abuser and his/her family in order to determine the patient’s needs. Emphasis will be placed on understanding behavioral and medical symptoms of drug and alcohol abuse and addiction and the tools needed to make the appropriate treatment referral. Treatment resources will be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite/Corequisite: DAA 3001  or permission of instructor. Not open to freshmen.
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    DAA 3023 - Drug and Alcohol Abuse Counseling with Family


    An investigation of the alcoholic and drug abusing family system, and the cumulative crisis in the family resulting from addiction. Emphasis will be placed on co-dependency, the characteristics of Children and Adult Children of Alcoholics (COA/ACOA) and other chemical abusers, prevalent treatment approaches and the role of self-help programs.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite/Corequisite: DAA 3001 , PSY 3001  or HEC 3001 or permission of instructor
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    DAA 3031 - Drug and Alcohol Abuse Counseling


    Application of counseling approaches, including treatment planning, setting goals and objectives, the therapeutic interview, the process of recovery and relapse counseling, to the drug and alcohol abuse situation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite/Corequisites: DAA 3001  or permission of instructor; Not Open to Freshmen
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    DAA 3220 - Psychology of Drug Habituation and Addiction


    Behavioral effects of sedative hypnotic compounds, stimulants, convulsants, anti-psychotic agents, psychedelics, hallucinogens, alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, and other drugs of psychological influence will be examined. Consideration will be given to attitudes toward drugs, theories of drug addiction and treatment. Methods of therapy will be discussed. Comparisons will be made with use of other methods for behavioral change.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: DAA 3001 /PSY 3001 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    DAA 3400 - Employee Assistance Program


    This course explores the history and changing models of employee assistance programs focusing on the impaired employee with drug and alcohol abuse and dependency problems, and personal and employment based difficulties that interfere with work performance. Students will learn about employee training, modes of intervention, supervisory and union participation, and the use of community and professional resources.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: DAA 3001 /PSY 3001 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PSY 201 - Introduction to Psychology 1


    An introduction to the fundamental data and theories of the science of psychology. Emphasis is on  experimental psychology, biological foundations of behavior, sensation, perception, development, consciousness, intelligence, and social foundations of behavior.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 202 - Introduction to Psychology 2


    An introduction to the fundamental data and theories of the science of psychology. Emphasis is on  experimental psychology, biological foundations of behavior, sensation, perception, development, consciousness, intelligence, and social foundations of behavior.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 210 - Educational Psychology


    An examination of psychological findings applied to the school situation. Emphasis is given to the fundamental principles involved in teaching and learning and the processes and interactions facilitating each. Topics include motivation, intelligence, standardized testing, developmental problems and group processes.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 101 , SOC 102 , POL 201 , POL 203 , PSY 201 , PSY 202 , ECO 201  or ECO 202 
    Not for core credit Not Open to Freshman Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 212 - Child Psychology


    A study in developmental psychology which introduces the student to the major aspects of change in childhood and pre-adolescence. Special attention is given to an evaluation of current cognitive, behavioral, and affective theories of child development and their respective contributions toward understanding the child’s reactions and interactions in the home, school and other settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not for core credit Not Open to Freshman Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 213 - Adolescent Psychology


    An examination of the major themes of adolescent development. Adolescent behavior as related to intellectual, emotional, and biological growth and development. Implication for formation of self-concept, search for identity, peer group influence, problems and processes related to educational and vocational goals.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not for core credit Not Open to Freshman Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 220 - Psychology of Women


    This course examines the scientific evidence regarding sexual differences and the controversies about these differences. Crucial issues affecting contemporary women and the women’s movement are examined from a psychological perspective.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Not for core credit. Not for Major Credit. Not Open to Freshman. Offered in Alternate Years.
  
  •  

    PSY 222 - Psychology of the Criminal Offender


    A course covering the basic issues and theories in criminal psychology with emphasis on criminal personality types, their evaluation and treatment, and prevention, as well as the causes of delinquent behavior.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not for Major Credit Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 241 - Mental Hygiene


    A study of disordered personal reactions and their fundamental dynamics; neurotic, psychotic and inadequate reactions to life and its circumstances; the defense mechanisms; possibilities for wholesome personality development in home, school and other environments; detection and prevention of poor adjustment; formal and informal therapeutic interventions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 246 - Self Assessment and Career Development


    This course will provide students with the tools for making effective career decisions through the use of self-assessment instruments, computerized career information systems and individual research projects. Skills fundamental to job seeking such as personal management, skill development, life goal clarification, interviewing and networking will be emphasized.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    New Freshman Only
    Not for core credit Open only to new Freshman & New Transfer Not for Major Credit Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 321 - Psychology of Human Sexuality


    A study of human sexuality from psychological and diversity viewpoints in order to help the students clarify their attitudes toward their own and other’s sexuality.  Areas to be investigated include environmental determinants of sexuality, sexual arousal and response, marital sexuality, sexual variance, sexual attitudes, diverse cultural differences of sexuality, and other topics selected by the class.  Note: it is recommended that students contact the instructor prior to enrollment to discuss the content of the course.  Not open to those who have taken PSY 221.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Not for core credit. Not Open to Freshman. Offered in the Fall Semester.
  
  •  

    PSY 323 - Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 1


    An introduction to statistics as applied in the behavioral sciences, including statements of psychological constructs in quantitative terms, measures of central tendency and variability, characteristics of the normal curve, confidence intervals, z-test, t-test, analysis of variance, chi square, and correlation and prediction.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 324 - Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 2


    Advanced concepts in statistical analyses for the behavioral sciences; an overview of principles and techniques, including higher order analysis of variance designs, analysis of covariance, multiple regression, repeated measures designs, and mixed designs.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: PSY 323  or approval of department chair. Not open to freshmen.
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 331 - Industrial-Organizational Psychology


    The application of psychological principles and techniques to personnel procedures in organizational settings; includes recruitment and selection, job analysis and design, employee performance, training, and development, leadership, motivation, and various aspects of organizational behavior.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Oral Intensive.
    Offered When Needed.
  
  •  

    PSY 336 - Psychological Tests and Measures


    Principles and practice of psychological measurement; administration, scoring, and interpretation of various types of psychological tests including intelligence, aptitude, achievement, interest and group measures of personality; problems of construction and standardization of measuring instruments; standards for evaluating tests.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 338 - History and Systems: Psychology of Learning


    An examination of contemporary empirical investigations and theoretical positions of human and animal learning, placing each position in its historical context within psychology.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: PSY 201  or PSY 202  or approval department chair. Not open to freshmen.
    Oral Intensive. Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 339 - Personality Theory


    An examination of the historical and current scientific efforts to bring insight to the analysis of human personality.  The theoretical contributions, research approaches, and clinical impact of major theories are analyzed.  The theories reviewed include psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, trait, humanistic, and biopsychosocial contributions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 341 - Brain, Mind, and Behavior


    This course introduces students to the study of how the brain and the rest of the nervous system produce many common behaviors. Drawing from both human and animal literatures, this course focuses on the fundamental principles of neural structure, function, communication, organization, and development, as well as examines the neural mechanisms that underlie a host of behaviors, including sensation and perception, movement, sleep, sex, emotion, eating/drinking, learning and memory, and language. This course also explores the effects of psychoactive drugs on brain and behavior, and how certain neural processes may be disrupted in specific neurological and psychological disorders.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 201  or permission of instructor; Not Open to Freshmen
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 342 - Violence toward the Self


    This course includes an in depth study of suicide and self-harm behaviors.  The initial portion of the course defines the continuum of self-harm and is multidisciplinary in nature examining sociological, religious, and philosophical perspectives of self-directed violence.  The latter portion delves into the psychological literature including theories and empirical research addressing clinical description, assessment, etiology, and prevention and treatment techniques for self-harm and suicidal behaviors. 
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Oral Intensive. Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 390 - Research Methods for Psychology 1


    This course will provide an introduction to research methods in psychology. Emphasis will be placed on ethical conduct of research, research techniques, statement of research problems, methodology, statistical analysis, interpretation of results, preparation of reports in APA style, and presentation of findings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: PSY 323  or approval of department chair; Not Open to Freshmen
    Written Intensive.
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 412 - Social Psychology


    This course offers a broad introduction to social psychology exploring the various ways people think about, influence, and relate to one another. Topics include but are not limited to social cognition, self-concept, social judgment, attitudes, persuasion, group processes, conformity, aggression, helping behavior, prejudice, and interpersonal relationships.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Offered in the Fall Semester. Written Intensive
  
  •  

    PSY 441 - Developmental Psychology


    A study of the theories of psychological development from birth to old age. Emphasis on the cognitive, motivational, physiological and social changes during infancy, childhood, adolescence, maturity and old age.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Written Intensive. Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 445 - Hormones and Behavior


    To what extent do hormones control who we are and how we behave? Why does the body use hormones to regulate behavior, and can our behavior influence our hormonal state? This course will examine these issues by introducing students to the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, which is the scientific study of the bidirectional interactions among hormones, the nervous system, and behavior. This course will explore the role of hormones in sexual differentiation, sex/mating behavior, parental behavior, aggression, stress and emotions, depression, brain plasticity, learning and memory, biological rhythms, feeding, and effects of endocrine disruptors. Students will critically evaluate both human and animal research in these areas, as well as discuss the clinical and social implications of the findings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 201  or BIO 101  or permission of instructor; Not Open to Freshmen
    Oral Intensive. Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 461 - Abnormal Psychology


    A study of the principal forms of disordered personal reactions to life and its circumstances; focus on the explanations of psychopathology with reference to psychodynamic, social, learning, and biological dimensions. Insight into the developmental aspects of abnormal and maladjusted behavior broaden the student’s understanding of various approaches to evidence-based psychotherapy and prevention.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 490 - Special Topics in Psychology


    Special Topics in Psychology
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    PSY 491 - Research Methods for Psychology 2


    A continuing research methods course in which students design, execute, write up, and present their own individual research study in areas such as cognition, emotion, auditory and visual perception, social processes, etc.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: PSY 390  and PSY 324  or approval of department chair. Not Open to Freshmen
    Capstone Course.
    Oral Intensive.
    Written Intensive.
    Offered in the Fall Semester.
  
  •  

    PSY 492 - Special Topics in Psychology


    Intensive study opportunities in areas of specialization not covered in depth by existing courses. Course instruction may include lectures, readings, and immersive study. Students may take more than one special topcs courses. Specific student topic to be indicated when offered. Not open to freshmen. Permission of department chair required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Open To Freshmen
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    PSY 493 - Individual Experimental Research


    A field or laboratory and seminar course for senior psychology majors within which each student will complete a research project of his or her own design under supervision of one of the members of the Psychology Department; class meetings devoted to analysis of project designs and to the study of periodical literature. Integration and coordination of previous coursework. Weekly progress reports; laboratory hours at the convenience of the student.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: PSY 390  or approval of department chair
    Capstone Course Open to Seniors Only Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PSY 496 - Applied Practice in Psychology


    A seminar for senior psychology majors aimed at effecting a synthesis and application of previous learning in the discipline. This may include research of topics in areas of interest to students and faculty and/or internship/field work at outside settings.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: PSY 390  or approval of department chair. Not Open to Freshmen
    Capstone Course.
    Oral Intensive.
    Open to Seniors Only.
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    PSY 497 - Independent Study


    The psychology of a student’s chosen topic is explored in-depth utilizing a variety of current methodologies and directed by a particular faculty member. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair or Advisor. Not for major credit. 1, 2, 3 credits respectively.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Not for Major Credit
    Department Consent Required
  
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    PSY 499 - Independent Study


    The psychology of a student’s chosen topic is explored in-depth utilizing a variety of current methodologies and directed by a particular faculty member. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair or Advisor. Not for major credit. 1, 2, 3 credits respectively.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
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    PSY 3001 - Introduction to Drug and Alcohol Abuse Studies


    A study of the biological psychological and sociological aspects of drug and alcohol abuse and addiction. An emphasis on the psycho-pharmacology of commonly abused substances, the disease concept of chemical dependency and an overview of substance abuse problems in the family, school and industry.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
  
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    PSY 3011 - Assessment Referral and Treatment Methods


    A study of the process of appraisal and evaluation of the chemical abuser and his/her family in order to determine the patient’s needs. Emphasis will be placed on understanding behavioral and medical symptoms of drug and alcohol abuse and addiction and the tools needed to make the appropriate treatment referral. Treatment resources will be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite/Corequisite:  PSY 3001 , DAA 3001  or permission of instructor. Not Open to Freshmen
  
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    PSY 3023 - Drug/Alcohol Abuse Counseling with the Family


    An investigation of the alcoholic and drug abusing family system, and the cumulative crisis in the family resulting from addiction. Emphasis will be placed on co-dependency, the characteristics of Children and Adult Children of Alcoholics (COA/ACOA) and other chemical abusers, prevalent treatment approaches and the role of self-help programs.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite/Corequisite: PSY 3001 , DAA 3001  or permission of instructor. Not Open to Freshmen.
  
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    PSY 3031 - Drug and Alcohol Counseling


    Application of counseling approaches, including treatment planning, setting goals and objectives, the therapuetic interview, the process of recovery and relapse counseling, to the drug and alcohol abuse situation. Same course as DAA 3031 .
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite/Corequisite: PSY 3001 , DAA 3001  or permission of the instructor.  Not Open to Freshmen.
  
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    PSY 3101 - Health Counseling


    This course provides an overview of the health counseling field including the role of psychological factors in the etiology and treatment of physical illness. Basic counseling theories are reviewed and related to health counseling interventions. Emphasis is placed on cognitive-behavorial treatment strategies pertaining to health maintenance, primary prevention and risk factor reduction.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
  
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    PSY 3220 - Psychology of Drug Habituation and Addiction


    Behavioral effects of sedative hypnotic compounds, stimulants, convulsants, anti-psychotic agents, psychedelics, hallucinogens, alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, and other drugs of psychological influence will be examined. Consideration will be given to attitudes toward drugs, theories of drug addiction and treatment. Methods of therapy will be discussed. Comparisons will be made with use of other methods for behavioral change.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: DAA 3001 /PSY 3001 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    PSY 3400 - Employee Assistance Programs


    This course explores the history and changing models of employee assistance programs focusing on clinical issues of drugs, alcohol, and psycho-pathologies as they relate to the workplace. Students learn about practitioner professionalization, supervisory and union representative training and the use of community resources to address personal and health problems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: DAA 3001 /PSY 3001 

Religious Studies

  
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    RST 204 - Christian Scriptures


    This course will familiarize students with the Scriptural bases - both Old and New Testaments of Catholicism. Special attention will be paid to the original context and meaning of the Scriptures, as well as their relevance and application in contemporary settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    RST 205 - Buddhist Wisdom


    Grounded in the Second Vatican Council’s “Declaration on the Relationship of the Church to Non-Christian Religion,” the course will introduce the heart of the Buddhist tradition by reflecting on the experience, life and teachings of Siddhartha Gotama, The Buddha.  Examining the religious and cultural context within which he lived and taught, the course will explore the insight and wisdom of the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path. Attention will be given to the development of Mahayana Buddhism though a consideration of primary texts from within that tradition.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural, and Global Perspectives
  
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    RST 206 - Spirituality


    An exploration of contemporary Christian spirituality as the lived experience of faith - the on-going life-project of person integration and self-transcendence - offering theological, historical, cultural, psychological and interfaith contexts for understanding its manifold expressions. The course will survey select trends and issues in contemporary Catholic spirituality signaled by Vatican Council II such as the post-modern quest for meaning; the impact on personal self-understanding of contemporary psychology and cosmology; the challenge of social and ecological commitment; the variety of contemplative resources available for the development of the inner self; the way of Gospel conversion and sacramentality; and the relevance of the Catholic vocation - its vision, values, and practice virtues - for the life of the self and of the world.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    RST 207 - Vatican II and Catholic Reform


    The Second Vatican Council (1962-65) revolutionized the relationship of the Roman Catholic Church to the modern world.  Within a few short years, a church that had been characterized as clerical, juridical, and triumphal assumed a different, more humble posture characterized by dialogical engagement with contemporary society.  The Council renewed the Church’s self-understanding and consequently all areas of Catholic theology experienced radical rethinking.  The sixteen documents of the Council will frame a study of the renewed meaning and practice of Catholicism in a post-conciliar age.  The renewal of theological categories such as revelation and scripture, God, Christ, ecclesiology, and Christian praxis will be examined.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    RST 208 - Ethics and Morality


    An exploration of the history of Christian ethics - its language, norms, sources - with particular consideration given to Roman Catholic teaching on morality. Contemporary issues such as war, sexuality, poverty, biomedicine and ecology will be examined to determine how a Christian ethical perspective informs a particular response to the questions raised within these areas.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    RST 210 - Religious Pluralism Series


    This series provides a context to explore the opportunities and challenges presented by twenty-first century religious pluralism. According to Harvard Professor of Comparative Religion and Indian Studies Dr. Diana Eck, “Pluralism” and “diversity” are sometimes used as if they were synonyms, but diversity is just plurality … [p]luralism is the engagement that creates a common society from all that plurality. It is the energetic engagement with diversity.” Cross-cultural religious literacy and engagement with the religious Other is essential in the contemporary global context as cross-currents of secularism, new religious movements, and resurgent fundamentalist articulations of all the major world religions collide and mingle with each other. One discrete field of focused study will be chosen for each semester the course runs. A non-exhaustive list of possible topics that can be rotated in the series are: Islam, Jainism, Afro-Caribbean religions, Hinduism, Indigenous Religiosity, Atheism/Humanism, and hybrid interfaith religious expressions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 213 - Religion and the Natural World


    This class will explore the relationship between religion and the natural world, investigating how religious worldviews have traditionally conceived of nature and have shaped human attitudes and behaviors toward it. Adopting a broad, religiously diverse perspective, the course will explore the convergences and distinctions among global religious traditions in their identification and celebration of nature as a sacred reality and their capacity to creatively respond to contemporary challenges and threats to the viability and integrity of nature in its planetary expanse.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    RST 215 - Islam: History, Belief, and Practice


    This course serves as an introduction to Islam. It is an exploration of Islam as a lived religion, which examines the diversity of Islamic practices, beliefs, and worldviews - in history and in the contemporary world. The course engages topics such as Islamic sacred texts, art and music, politics, and mysticism. The goals of this course are to introduce students to texts and tenets at the core of Islam and to foster an appreciation for the complexity and the diversity of Muslim practice historically and globally. This course takes a multifaceted approach to the study of Islam: course materials include primary Islamic texts, academic readings, memoirs, works of fiction, as well as audio-visual materials.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
  
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    RST 301 - Church History: Patterns and Paradigms of the Christian Tradition


    The life and thought of the Christian church from the apostolic period to the present, providing an introduction and orientation to the Christian tradition in its various social, ethnic and period settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 310 - The Religious Traditions of China


    This course will examine the insights, contributions and development of the three major traditions that have largely defined Chinese religious culture: Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. Emphasis will focus on the study of those primary textual sources (available in English translation) that most effectively illustrate the seminal concepts and subsequent elaborations within each of those traditions and their overall significance to chinese religious sensibility.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
  
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    RST 311 - Christian Approaches to Morality


    This course is an investigation of the fundamental themes of moral theology. The course will include a survey of the historical, methodological and philosophical approaches to Christian morality with reference to the ethical dilemmas that confront the modern world.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 317 - The American Religious Experience


    A study of the mutual interaction of religion and American culture, which has given rise to a unique variety of religious leaders and expressions.  Topics to be considered include the Puritan ethos in American history and literature, the concerns and conflicts of various immigrant groups, civic religion; pluralism and American culture, church - state relations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 318 - Violence, Peace & Social Justice


    A consideration of Catholic ethical thought, as an expression of Christian ethics in history, regarding non-violent movements for peace and social justice in the contemporary world, with a particular focus on the Christian foundations of economic, racial and political movements for justice.  Not open to students who have taken RST 209.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed. Oral Intensive. Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Violence.
  
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    RST 320 - Spiritual Masters Series


    An exploration of the sacred wisdom of the great masters of the spiritual life drawn from a variety of traditions, cultures and periods of history. Each semester the spiritual path of one such Great Teacher will be selected as subject for inquiry and experimentation (e.g., Jesus, the Buddha, Julian of Norwich, Hildegard of Bingen, Thich Nhat Hanh, Therese of Lixieux, Thomas Merton, Rabbi Heschel, Mother Ann Lee and the American Shakers, Dorothy Day, Thomas Berry, Bernard of Clairvaux, Teresa of Avila, Bede Griffiths, John of the Cross, Rumi, Martin Luther King, Mohammad and Black Elk).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 324 - Christian Sexual Ethics


    ENG 120  An exploration of the history of Roman Catholic and Protestant teaching on the meaning of human sexuality with particular attention to the sexual ethics that have developed in the Christian tradition.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120 or Honors Status.
    Offered When Needed. Written Intensive.
  
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    RST 326 - Theology of Christian Service


    A critical exploration through academic analysis and community engagement into the theological meanings of Christian service, the particular interconnections of service and justice in the Hebrew and Christian scriptures, contemporary understandings of service as informed by Christian theology, Catholic social teachings, and modern day icons of faith.  Service Learning Course.
    Service Learning
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
  
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    RST 327 - The Holocaust and the Churches


    This course studies the Holocaust through the lens of Jewish-Christian relations. Students will study the relationship between Christianity and Judaism including the teaching of contempt and the teaching of respect. The question of Christian anti-Judaism and its significance for the Holocaust will be examined.  The course is offered with a study abroad component. During spring break the class will embark on a journey to Auschwitz-Birkenau.  Time will be spent in the cities of Oswiecim, Krakow, and Wadowice.  Students will explore the effects of the Holocaust in those cities and experience contemporary Polish life. DCCG for core curriculum. Integrated core course for Violence ICT in the core curriculum.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Core Course
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
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    RST 328 - The Religious Imagination


    This course explores the myriad ways that human beings have encountered “the sacred” as an alluring yet perplexing horizon of existence. The course examines the rich variety of such encounters as they have been expressed across history and cultures.  Students will also explore how our ideas of the self, society, and the cosmos are shaped by the religious imagination.  Not open to students who have taken RST 101, RST 203 and RST 220.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed.
    Core Course
    Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Identity.
  
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    RST 330 - Women, Gender, and Religion


    This course is a study of the lives of women and gender identities from a variety of perspectives and in various religious traditions.  It explores a wide range of issues and concerns, which have particular relevance to the religious experiences of women and persons of various gender identities.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Feminist Interventions. Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 332 - The Spiritual Legacy of Thomas Merton


    A study of the themes and issues that comprise the spiritual teaching of Thomas Merton, Ameican Monk, mystic and prophet. The desire for Christian contemplation, a passion for justice and an appetite for Buddhism marked Merton’s spirituality as uniquely contemporary and catholic. A modern spiritual master, Merton has sounded the keynotes for Christian life in the new millennium. By following Merton along his spiritual path, students may explore the legacy of this exceptional teacher and draw upon his wisdom and insight for their own lives.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
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    RST 336 - The Church: Issues and Challenges


    An exposition of the historical and theological foundations necessary for an examination of the nature and function of the church; an analysis of selected issues and challenges facing the contemporary church, with a view to the imaginative responses made by Christian churches.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 338 - Gospels


    A detailed examination of the four canonical gospels, the process by which they were formed, the form and function of their individual parts, and the final literary and theological effect they now have as complete works.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    RST 339 - Spirituality for an Ecological Age


    An exploration of contemporary proposals for new modes of Christian praxis in response to the critical moment of 21st century Earth history, which calls for the activation of creative energies to meet the current planetary crises of climate disruption, species extinction, resource depletion, food scarcity and, in light of these, unprecedented levels of human distress and suffering. Since religious traditions perceive our environmental situation as a disorientation of human consciouness and spirit summoning moral conversion, this course asks what specifically Christian initiatives and resources are available to fund a disciplined, creative and celebratory ecological spirituality arising from the religious tradition, the new cosmology and in dialogue with other sacred and secular voices of wisdom.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    RST 340 - Creation Masters Series


    It is urgent that the work of our age is to come into a new relationship with the natural world, so exhausted and abused by the demands of human kind. The ecological crisis, now at a critical stage, is essentially spiritual at root. Therefore, the task ahead of us will take tremendous religious awareness and spiritual commitment if we are to envision and then actualize a new sense of our human identity not against nature, but in communion with all the creatures and elements of the living Earth. This course will explore a variety of voices in the history of religions, with a special focus on Christian resources, who will guide us toward a vision of ecological wholeness. This course will take one or more masters or movements in religious cosmology under consideration each semester that it is taught. Examples include but are not limited to: Hildegard of Bingen, Celtic Creation Spirituality, the Benedictines, the Franciscans, Teilhard de Chardin, and Thomas Berry.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    RST 341 - Story of the Universe: Foundational Cosmology and Earth History


    This class will explore the significance of the universe, the emergence of the earth, and the evolution of life as integral creative events; it will seek to identify a comprehensive narrative description of the cosmos from its primordial origin through the formation of galaxies, the birth of the solar system, the shaping of the earth, the diversity of life, and the role of human consciousness within its unfolding process.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring. Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Stewardship of the Earth
  
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    RST 343 - Sufism: Traditions of Islamic Mysticism


    This course serves as an introduction to Sufism. Often defined as Islamic mysticism, Sufism is perhaps one of the most widely practiced forms of Islam in the world. Sufi practice is especially prominent in South Asia, West Africa, and Eurasia. This course will delve into ideas and debates that are at the core of Sufi philosophy and cosmology. It will survey various modes of Sufi practice and belief among lay adherents and among those on the mystical path. It will also take a close and critical look at aspects of Sufi practice that have permeated popular culture in Europe and America over the past century. This course takes a multifaceted approach to the study of Sufism: course materials include primary Sufi texts, academic readings, as well as audio-visual materials
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Written Intensive.
  
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    RST 345 - Sacred Music and Poetry


    This course is an exploration of globally and religiously diverse forms of sacred music and verse. Using foundational concepts, students explore the shared human experiences that undergird the music and poetry of the Abrahamic faiths, South Asian and East Asian religions, and indigenous and Native American religious traditions. The course is interdisciplinary in its approach, engaging with methodology and questions from within the disciplines of religious studies, cultural anthropology, and ethnomusicology.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
    Core Course
    Oral Intensive
    DCCG
     
 

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