2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Sep 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

History

Courses may be classified as follows:

Core Curriculum:

Humanities Requirements History Core Course Choices: HST 101 HST 120 , HST 201 , HST 304 , HST 310 , HST 311 , HST 315 , HST 319 , HST 335 , HST 336 , HST 337 , HST 338 , HST 343 , HST 345 , HST 346 , HST 351 , HST 352, HST 355 , HST 360 , HST 368 , HST 370 , HST 372 , HST 374 , HST 381 , HST 382 , HST 385 , HST 386 , HST 391 , HST 392 , HST 393 , HST 396 , HST 410 , HST 411 , GEO 415 .

Diversity, Cross-Cultural, and Global Perspectives Core Course Choices: GEO 305 , GEO 415 , HST 319 , HST 337 , HST 338 , HST 345 , HST 355 , HST 360 , HST 368 , HST 370 , HST 372 , HST 374 , HST 381 , HST 382 , HST 385 , HST 386 , HST 391 , HST 392 , HST 393 , HST 396 .

Integrated Core Themes (ICT) Centerpiece Courses: HST 345  (Violence ICT), HST 304  (Innovation and Creative Mind ICT)

  1. American History: HST 207 , HST 208 , HST 304  , HST 310 , HST 311 , HST 315 , HST 319 , HST 335 , HST 336 , HST 337 , HST 338 .
  2. European History: HST 337  , HST 341, HST 343 , HST 345 , HST 346 , HST 348, HST 351 , HST 352, HST 355 , HST 360 , HST 368 , HST 370 , HST 372 , HST 374 .
  3. Non-Western History: HST 338  , HST 360  , HST 381 , HST 382 , HST 385 , HST 386 , HST 391 , HST 392 , HST 393 , HST 395, HST 396 .
  4. Colloquia, Seminars and Research: HST 301 , HST 410 , HST 411 , HST 491 , HST 492, HST 497 , HST 499 .
  5.  

  
  •  

    HST 351 - Europe, 1648-1799: The Age of Reason and Revolutions


    This course studies European history from the end of the Thirty Years’ War to the French Revolution. Students will learn about the rise and fall of absolutist and constitutional political systems, and their relationship to the wars of the early modern era, new economic and social trends, the appearance of “public opinion,” and the Enlightenment.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
  
  •  

    HST 352 - Ideologies and Empires in Nineteenth-Century Europe


    This course explores the revolutionary developments that happened in Europe between 1799 and 1914, starting with the Napoleonic wars and industrialization.  It also examines the ideologies that arose with them:  liberalism, conservatism, socialism, and nationalism.  Students will then study the relationship of these ideologies to nation-building, imperialism, and World War I.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 353 - Warfare in the Modern West, 1494-2017


    War.  The word evokes a powerful response.  It conjures up a multitude of negative associations:  cruelty, violence, ruthlessness, destruction, pain, death, and the suffering of innocents.  At the same time, war has also inspired some of the most admirable of human traits and behaviors:  courage, determination, innovation, and self-sacrifice.  For these and other reasons, war fascinates historians and the general public alike.  Moreover, interest in the subject has only intensified due to the recent military conflicts provoked by the response of the United States to terrorist acts carried out by groups following a particular vision of Islam.  Although academic historians have devoted more attention to warfare over the last two decades, war and military organizations have played a decisive role throughout the history of Western civilization.  Wars and the armies and navies that fought them shaped the countries and peoples of the West in profound and fundamental ways.  Military might also allowed Western states to extend their control over numerous lands and populations throughout the world during the modern era, and this very domination generated new armed struggles that continue to affect events around the globe today.  In this course, we will study these trends by examining the military history of the West from the late fifteenth century to the present day.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    ENG 120   or Honors Program Status
  
  •  

    HST 355 - The Soviet Experiment and Post-Soviet Successor States


    An analysis of Russian civilization and the impact of the West, Special attention will be given to Marxism, the nature of Soviet experiment in democracy, totalitarianism, policy toward nationalities, and the implications of the Russian Revolution. The socioeconomic and cultural problems of communism and the reasons for its demise will be also discussed. The present-day conditions of Azerbaijan, Georgia, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Belarus, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Moldova, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia will be examined as well.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered Fall, Winter, Spring & Summer
  
  •  

    HST 360 - Historical Geography


    This course examines the role of landscape, natural resources, and environment in key historical events. Students will be introduced to classical and contemporary theories of the discipline and will examine case studies from both Western and non-Western centers of civilization.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
  
  •  

    HST 368 - Conflict in Twentieth-Century Europe


    World War I, World War II, and the Cold War, and the upheavals that they provoked altered Europe profoundly. These conflicts caused millions of casualties and led to totalitarianism and genocide.  There were positive outcomes as well: women’s suffrage, greater government assistance for Europe’s citizens, and independence for its colonies. This course examines these trends.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 370 - Russia under the Romanovs (1613-1917)


    The three centuries of Romanov rule in Russia transformed an Asiatic state into a European power. The course will concentrate not only on the internal conditions of Russia, but also on the effect it had on the political and socioeconomic history of Asia and Europe. The course will examine the complex but fascinating history of Russia under the Romanov dynasty. Students will make detailed examination of the reigns of Russian rulers such as the early Romanovs, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Paul, Alexander I, Nicholas I, Alexander II, Alexander III and Nicholas II. The course will also examine the Napoleonic wars, serfdom, Church reforms, political reforms, efforts of industrialization and modernization, foreign wars and treaties, Pan-Slavism and Pan-Russian philosophies, as well as the emergence of Socialism.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 372 - Eastern Europe under Communism and After


    This course examines the history of Eastern Europe from 1930s to the present. The course will concentrate on the political and socioeconomic factors that led to the rise of nationalism, totalitarianism, communism in Bulgaria, Romania, Poland, Hungary, Albania, and Czech and Slovakia, as well as the unique situation of Yugoslavia (Serbia, Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia, and Montenegro). The role of the region in WWII, the postwar era (the Cold War and the Warsaw Pact), the religious conflicts, and its struggle to adopt Western democratic and economic principles following the collapse of the Soviet Union will be examined as well. The objective of the course is to familiarize students by introducing them to primary and secondary sources, watching films and discussions in order to explain a part of Europe, which was and continues to be a zone of conflict.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 374 - Revolution in the Modern World


    A study of revolution and reaction in modern history. The course compares contemporary concepts and manifestations of revolution to the causes, course and consequences of the age of the Atlantic Revolution in the eighteenth and nineteeth centuries.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 381 - African Civilization


    This course traces the evolution of sites of civilization in Sub-Saharan Africa from earliest recorded times to the era of the slave trade. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of environmental advantages and constraints upon centers of civilization, the evolution of unique values and institutions in the civilizations under study, and the placing of events in early Sub-Saharan Africa into a global context.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 382 - Africa in the Modern World


    This course traces the history of Sub-Saharan Africa from the era of the slave trade to the present day. Key themes include the interaction of European and African culture as a result of the colonial experience, the independence movements, and a study of patterns of both problems and potentials in the era of independence.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 385 - The Modern Middle East: From the Rise of Nation States to ISIS


    The course will complement historical literature with geographic and ethnographic perspectives fundamental to an understanding of the area. Geographically, the course will include the Ottoman Empire in Europe and Asia and its successor state–Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, and Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Iran. Topically it will consider the world wars and imperialism; revolutions, independence and and nationalism; the Arab-Israeli conflict and regional politics; the cold war; the politics of oil; Iraq under Saddam; Syria under the Asads; Iran under the Ayatollahs; the Arab Spring and its aftermath in Egypt and north Africa and the rise of local fundamentalist groups, such as the Taliban, Al-Qaida and ISIS.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 386 - The Iranian World and its Heritage in Afghanistan and the Post-Soviet Muslim Republics, 1500-Present


    The new course will focus on a rarely studied phenomenon, that is, the Iranian political, linguistic, religious and cultural influence on the future and present-day states of Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Iraq, Turkey, Pakistan and India. Current events have focused the attention of the world to this rarely studied region. Topics discussed will include the rise of Shi`ism; the Safavid State and the rise of modern Iran; European contacts with Iran, Iran versus Russia and Britain; Iran and Transcaucasia, Iran and Mughal India; colonialism, Iranian nationalism and the creation of a modern State; Iran and the Caucasus; Iran and Central Asia; the Great Game and the creation of Afghanistan; Iran and the politics of oil; Iran versus the Turkish and Arab Middle East; revolutions in Iran and Afghanistan; the fall of the USSR and its effect on the Caucasus and Central Asia; the US invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan and Iran; Iran’s role in the Arab World; Iran’s current relations with US, Russia, China, India, and the European Union.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
  •  

    HST 391 - China: From Confucianism to Communism


    A survey of Chinese history, religion and culture which focuses on the traditional roots and the modernization experience. The achievements of major dynasties in the premodern period will be highlighted. The impact of foreign imperialism and the development of Chinese communism in the modern period will be emphasized.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 392 - Japan: From Ancient Myth to Constitutional Monarchy


    A survey of Japanese history, religion and culture which focuses on Japan’s preservation of its past while adapting to change. Emphasis will be placed on early court culture, the medieval Samurai ethos, the later seclusion period, twentieth-century imperialism and the Pacific War.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    HST 393 - A History of Southern Asia


    A survey of Indian history, religion and culture which focuses on its traditional past and its modern experience. Emphasis will be placed on the role of religion in Indian history, on the British period in India, and on the emergence of the modern Indian nation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 396 - The Emergence of Modern Latin America


    A study of Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries emphasizing the Wars of Independence; the role of the Church; the geographic, political, social, economic and cultural forces that shaped the development of the emerging Latin American nations; and the history of selected Latin American nations; United States-Latin American relations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    HST 410 - Seminar in History


    Research and readings in selected topics and problems.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    HST 411 - Oral History: Methodology and Applications


    This course will introduce students to the practice and craft of history by reading about theory and methodology, understanding background research, arranging and conducting interviews, transcribing, editing, and writing papers or developing other projects related to the oral histories they have collected. The main work of this course will be the “hands on” collection of oral history from individuals who have lived through key historical events.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    HST 490 - Colloquium in History


    A course involving classroom discussions based upon specific required readings in selected historical topics. Readings are usually drawn from original historical sources, as well as from standard monographs, special studies and critical articles in the field. Must be taken no later than junior years for majors.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    HST 491 - Special Topics in History


    These courses are designed to offer an intensive study opportunity in an area of specialization not covered in great depth by existing courses. Some of the topics which may be covered are: “The History of South Africa,” “Caribbean History,” ” The Renaissance,” “Social History of Ireland,” “Irish Antiquity,” and “Formation of Evolution of the European Community.” Students may take more than one special topics course. Specific topics will be indicated when they are offered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    HST 495 - Internship


    Internship in fields which develop and sharpen the student’s experience with scholarship, preservation, collection, exhibition, awareness, marketing, and/or knowledge of history [and the career paths pertinent to a degree in history]. Conferences with designated faculty members and research reports will supplement the student’s practical experience.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    HST 497 - Capstone in History


    A course involving guided research and writing on selected historical topics, it is conducted through group discussions and critical analyses of written seminar papers as they progress.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: HST 301  and Senior status
    Capstone Course.
    Oral Intensive. Written Intensive.
    Open to Seniors Only.
    Offered in the Fall Semester.
  
  •  

    HST 499 - Supervised Reading and Research


    An independent course of study concentrating on a specific topic approved by a faculty advisor. Students will meet with an advisor on a regular basis for guidance and for the submission of progress reports.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required

Information Systems and Business Analytics

  
  •  

    BUS 150 - Introduction to Information Systems


    In this course, students will gain a basic understanding of information systems including their uses in organizations and impacts on business.  The course will cover the technological foundations of information systems as well the organizational and management dimensions of IS.  The student will learn about the acquisition, security, and management of technology and information resources.  The course includes an emphasis on current and emerging trends in IS as well as related ethical and social issues.  Students will also develop skills in analyzing business problems and designing appropriately structured solutions using Excel software.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    BUS 320 - Operations Management


    This course provides a solid foundation in the role of operations management in improving the delivery of goods and services in any organization. Students will learn about the integration of human, economic and technological factors in accomplishing the operations management mission and executing the related strategies in an ethical manner.  Topics covered will include - mission and strategy development, demand forecasting, capacity planning, facility location, process strategy to include design and layout, inventory management, project management and total quality management (TQM).  Students will be introduced to analytical and computer software tools required for operations management.  Case studies will be used to illustrate the application of operations management in business. 
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 210  or equivalent
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    IS 301 - Applied Statistical Analysis


    An intensive study of intermediate statistics to permit the student to learn key concepts by actually performing the steps necessary to formulate problems, run actual data on the computer and analyze the results. Topics include sampling concepts and methods, forecasting techniques, analysis of varance and nonparametric statistics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 150  and BUS 210 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    IS 302 - Applied Optimization Methods


    Development of significant techniques of mathematical programming with applications to business decision making. Topics include linear programming and extensions, network models, integer programming, nonlinear and dynamic programming. Practice problems will be run on the computer.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 150  and BUS 320 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    IS 310 - Information Systems Analysis and Design


    Topics covered in the lectures and readings are systems development life cycle prototyping, analysis and design tools, techniques and objectives, and hardware/software evaluation and selection. The course involves the class in a development project in which the material studied in the course will be utilized. Project assignments include determination of user requirements, logical and physical design, building the data dictionary, and the development and testing of software modules. Also considered are the writing of end-user procedures manuals and user training. Classes will include hands-on sessions in the use of the CASE tool that will be used for the course project.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150  
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    IS 315 - Information and Decision Technology in Sports and Gaming


    This course explores the application of information technology to athletics at both the collegiate and professional levels. The analysis extends to the application of decision technology to sports and gaming. Students in the course will complete a research paper and presentation as part of the assessment procedure.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 150 , BUS 210 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    IS 320 - Applications Development with Visual Basic


    This course will emphasize computer applications development in order to implement solutions to systems in a business environment. The applications development tool of Visual Basic will be utilized. Students will build on their knowledge of spreadsheets and databases by exploring visual basic extensions to those applications development generators. The power of the development language will be applied to the design and development of a significant course project which will be presented to the class using presentation software systems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    IS 328 - Total Quality Management


    This course provides a working knowledge of Total Quality Management (TQM) and its application to external and internal customers in goods and services industries. The student gains an appreciation of why World Class organizations practice TQM and how it results in competitive advantage and positive results in revenue and profit. The course examines principles, concepts and tools in order to provide the foundation on which TQM programs as well other quality initiates are created, developed, implemented and continuously improved. A major learning is the critical role of top down leadership in establishing and sustaining a TQM environment. Through class discussions and the instructor’s experiences the student learns how corporations have utilized TQM in their respective businesses and healthcare areas. There will be much discussion on the business concept and business model of supply chain management. This course will focus and explore how healthcare defines TQM, its impact on that marketplace segment and the quality concepts in a healthcare environment as well as in the industrial, service, and manufacturing sectors.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered during Special Sessions
  
  •  

    IS 335 - Database Management


    This course presents an introduction to database management. The student will study data relationships, data structures, normalization of data, data modeling, and database methods. The student will design the conceptual, logical and physical view of a specific database. The course utilizes a hands-on approach with practical problems used as theory reinforcement. In addition to homework assignments, the student will have a major project on database design which will be presented to the class.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    IS 415 - Big Data Analytics and Business Innovation


    Many organizations are working with unmanageably large data sets, called Big Data, and the importance of using data analytics that can cope with this scale of data is considerable. Organizations’ ability to identify patterns and to gain analytical results to achieve competitive advantages creates great opportunities for business innovation, as organizations are capable of harvesting relevant data and using it to make the best decisions to achieve business innovations. Efficiently extracting, interpreting, and learning from Big Data requires a new generation of scalable algorithms as well as new data management technologies. This course will explore key data analysis and management techniques applied to Big Data and its impact on business innovations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    IS 431 - Building Mobile Business Applications


    This course covers how to develop business applications for mobile platforms. Sample mobile business applications will be dissected, and tool suites for the development of mobile software will be covered, including programming languages, frameworks, libraries and integrated development environments. Topics include: design of mobile user interfaces, application life-cycle, multi-threading, inter-process communication, data persistency, content providers, background services, geo-location and mapping, networking and web services, telephony, messaging, graphics, performance, and security. The target computing environment changes overtime; currently the course mainly explores the Android Operating system and its supporting SDK, but sample apps for iPhone will be discussed as well. We will begin by using simulators before porting to actual devices.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    IS 432 - Predictive Analytics for Business


    This course covers the application of predictive analytics to describe and classify businesses in an organization, and to explore opportunities for future development. These techniques can be instrumental in understanding various business models and optimizing the cost of doing business. In this course, students will learn how statistical models such as those produced by multiple regression analysis and factor analysis are used to determine the critical success factors and key performance indicators in various areas of business operations. Other predictive analytical tools covered in this course include discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, and conjoint analysis. Analytical tools will be used to analyze a variety of business models such as bricks-and-clicks, direct sales, and franchise models.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    IS 435 - Risk Analysis and Decision Technology


    Decision technology to support management for an organization is the main topic of this course. Particular attention will be paid to situations involving risk and uncertainty. This course provides an overview of decision analysis, optimization modeling, and simulation modeling. Topics include risk assessment, project risk, control measures, structuring decisions, complex decision making, feasibility analysis of alternatives, sensitivity analysis, modeling uncertainty, value of information, modeling preferences, risk attitudes, conflicting objectives, and decision technologies. The purpose is to be able to represent real-world problems using models to gain qualitative insight through quantitative analysis. A broad spectrum of applications and decision problems will be addressed and the most practical analytics useful in developing strategies and plans will be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 150  and BUS 210  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    IS 440 - Audit and Control of Information Systems


    This course introduces the concepts of computer-based auditing and control of information systems. Various types of layered control structures are discussed in the context of a secure environment. Hardware, software and personnel controls are presented along with audit strategies for successful implementation. Audit programs for advanced concepts in information systems (database, networks) are developed. A course project implementing CAAT is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    IS 445 - Cybersecurity for Business


    Information security is becoming one of the top management priorities for every organization. While digitalization improves an organization’s competitive advantage, information security incidents can damage its reputation, disrupt business operations, and be costly to address. This course surveys the fundamental concepts of information systems security from a managerial perspective. Specifically, students will be introduced to common risks, threats, and vulnerabilities of business organizations, how attacks are carried out, and how to defend proactively from these cyber-attacks. Topics include computer security, assessing and mitigating cyber risks, understanding attack vectors, database and network security, security analytics, cloud security and proactive information security strategies.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    IS 450 - Seminar in Information Systems


    An advanced course in information systems that will focus on a special topic or theme. This course is designed as a vehicle to explore current and emerging technologies in the field. A significant project is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150 . For Information Systems majors only
    Not Liberal Arts
  
  •  

    IS 463 - Independent Study in Information Systems


    Students undertake an advanced, specialized study project not covered by the regular course offerings. Students participate in individual conferences with a faculty member to plan, execute, and discuss the project. 1-3 credits
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150  and Senior standing
    Not Liberal Arts Open to Seniors Only Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    IS 465 - Internship in Information Systems


    Students must carry out a supervised work project under the direction of a faculty member and a designated executive from either a for-profit or a not-for-profit enterprise. A report based on the learning experience and submitted for joint review must be completed for credit to be awarded.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    IS 486 - Text Mining for Business


    Discovering insights from data can be complex - and that’s even more complicated when organizations encounter large volumes of textual data (both semi-structured and unstructured), such as call center logs, emails, social media, corporate documents/forms, and so on. This course examines the unique characteristics of text mining, an emerging field, from a business perspective. It provides a broad overview of text mining techniques and their use in various business applications. 
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150  
    Offered in the Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    IS 490 - Current Topics in Information Systems


    In a quickly changing technology environment, it is crucial for business students to stay current. This course will cover a topic or set of topics in Information Systems that is relevant to current or emerging business technologies, but is not an area of focus in other Information Systems offerings.  The topic of the course may be different each time it is offered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150  
    Not Liberal Arts
  
  •  

    IS 491 - Special Topics in Information Systems


    In-depth coverage of a selected topic in information systems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1, 2, or 3
    Not liberal arts.
    Offered when needed.
  
  •  

    IS 492 - Current Topics in Business Analytics


    An advanced course in business analytics that will focus on a special topic or theme. This course is designed as a vehicle to explore current and emerging topics in the field. A significant project is required. The topic of the course may be different each time it is offered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 150  
    Offered in Fall & Spring

Management

  
  •  

    BUS 220 - Principles of Management


    An introduction to the needs and values of formal organizations and individuals, and group dynamics as they relate to decision making in the organization. The objective of the course is to provide insights into the underlying principles and approaches employed in effective organizations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing
    Not Liberal Arts
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    BUS 410 - The Role of Business in Contemporary American Society


    This course examines the nature and important implications of the increasingly complex set of relationships among business, government, and society. Topics for analysis and discussion include corporate social responsibility, business ethics, government regulations and the role of government in a market economy, corporate governance, employee relations and labor unions, consumerism and product liability, environmentalism and economic growth, and the international dimensions of business.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing and BUS 220  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Open to Seniors Only
    Written Intensive
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    BUS 470 - Business Policy and Strategy


    The management of large-scale enterprises is approached from an interfunctional, general management perspective, focusing on the formulation, development and implementation of the overall goals and strategies of an enterprise under conditions of uncertainty. This capstone course provides an integrative experience designed to apply the knowledge and skills developed in earlier coursework in the functional business areas and requires students to present and defend orally and in writing, solutions to simulated real world problems concerned with the overall management of an enterprise.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: All 100, 200, and 300 level business core courses must be completed prior to taking this course, and senior status.
    Not Liberal Arts
    Open to Seniors Only
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MNG 305 - Project Management


    An introduction to the concepts of Project Management with an overview of techniques applied and tools available. Case studies of both successful and unsuccessful project initiatives will provide insights into strategy alternatives and explore best practices. Topics will include project planning, team building, project deliverables, risk assessment, conducting successful meetings, managing conflict, software tools, and certification.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Summer
  
  •  

    MNG 315 - Bargaining and Negotiation


    Bargaining and negotiation principles and procedures are explored in-depth. As one example, a critical examination is made of the most important events in the often-violent history of the global labor movement, as well as an analysis of legal and organizational attempts to replace that violence with more productive actions. The end goal is to develop more collaborative and successful strategies and approaches to bargaining and negotiation in multiple business settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220  
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MNG 319 - Special Topics in Management


    This course will study special topics of current interest in Management. It will be offered periodically as the needs and interests of students and faculty dictate.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MNG 321 - Organizational Behavior


    This course offers an in-depth analysis of processes such as motivation, leadership, group dynamics, communication, organizational change, culture and design. The focus will be on behavioral problems that can inhibit the effectiveness of organizations. Theories and concepts are introduced to facilitate understanding and creative problem solving. Various experiential exercises, cases and group projects are used to illustrate the problems and apply solutions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MNG 328 - Management of Financial Institutions


    This course examines theoretical and practical issues influencing the management of financial institutions at the individual and organizational levels. Through the use of case studies, videos, site visits and in-class discussions, we will explore the complex human elements that both coerce and constrain the economic and financial systems locally and globally.
    Lecure
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  BUS 220  
  
  •  

    MNG 330 - Small Business Management


    This course studies one of the fastest growing segments of our economy - small business. Specifically, the course covers the challenges of developing, starting, and operating a small business in the United States (including franchising). It will help develop an awareness of the complexities of managing such an enterprise.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220  
    Not Liberal Arts Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
  •  

    MNG 345 - Introduction to Leadership


    This course provides a fundamental understanding of leadership in society and builds on the principles of leadership and management introduced in other courses. The course will cover how to manage the roles of leadership and authority and guide the students to develop maturity and insight about leading and managing. This course will draw upon several academic disciplines and co-curricular, extracurricular and service involvement of the students. Special topics include cultural diversity, leadership challenges for minorities and women, and self-assessment.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MNG 350 - Human Resource Management


    Analysis of the principles and practices of HRM in the areas of human resource planning and policy, recruitment and selection, training and career development, labor relations, performance management, compensation management, and HR information management. Special attention will be paid to the new issues and challenges facing the HR manager as a result of changes in the social and legal environment, demographic diversity, and the global marketplace.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MNG 360 - Corporate Environmental Management


    This course explores the requirements for an effective corporate environmental management program. Corporate environmental management involves organizational structure, environmental regulation requirements, environmental compliance process, tracking performance, sustainability, ethics and liability, and an evaluation of the business of “being green”. The course will also analyze historical environmental management events such as the BP Gulf of Mexico oil spill and Love Canal.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MNG 380 - Managing Sports Organizations


    This course will introduce students to the dynamic field of sport management. Topics will include management issues and principles, history of sport management, varieties of sport organizations, legal issues, human resource issues, branding, and strategic analysis. Students will examine the billion-dollar sport industry and identify the vast, creative and substantial role business plays in professional, collegiate, and amateur sports. Emerging trends in the sport management field will also be considered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220 
    Not Liberal Arts
  
  •  

    MNG 406 - Advanced Project Management


    An examination of the theory of Project Management with a detailed review and analysis of techniques applied and tools available. Students will be exposed to various approaches to Project Management used for large projects as well as small while surveying case studies of both successful and unsuccessful project initiatives. Topics will include a review of all basic subject matter covered in MNG 305 plus cost estimation techniques, budgeting, scope and stakeholder management, communications, conflict resolution, risk management, monitoring project performance, resource management, process mapping, and a review of the various certification qualifications. This course will reinforce the concepts learned though hands-on use of Microsoft Project. The instructor will guide students in considering the MS Project certification.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MNG 413 - Leadership and Management in Sports, Entertainment and Media


    Exploration of elements behind the rise and success of sports and entertainment media, such as: 1) Values that enable prosperity in the early years of an organization. 2) Leadership principles that sustain a growth trajectory. 3) Methods for dealing with crisis management situations. 4) Developing and implementing product and programming innovation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220  
  
  •  

    MNG 414 - International Management


    This course focuses on the unique requirements and environmental factors associated with the management of international organizations. An in-depth examination of the impact of different cultures on legal, political, social, religious and economic systems engages the student in this increasingly important dimension of business management.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MNG 415 - International Human Resource Management


    Application of the principles and practices of HRM in the international organization. The case method will be used to develop student’s understanding of the international human resource function and the management of the HR function in multinational organizations. Cultural differences and legal HRM requirements in host countries will be compared. Emphasis will be on the foreign operations of the multinational organizations. Selected readings will be utilized to improve student skills.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MNG 425 - Managerial Decision Making


    An intensive study of managerial decision-making skills. Special emphasis will be placed upon the case method whereby actual organizational problems will be evaluated and proposed decisions developed by the student.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 220  and Senior Status
    Not Liberal Arts Open to Seniors Only Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MNG 446 - The Business and Management of Content Creation in Sports, Entertainment and Media


    The Business and Management of Content Creation in Today’s Media World will focus on the changing media marketplace and the video content that will continue to find its way to the consumer.  The course will cover 1) Analysis of the cable, broadcast and internet video businesses, 2) The monetization of video content for the television/web industry, 3) Content branding networks and sites in the video world, 4) Tracking consumer consumption of video through DVRs, cord cutting, cable or satellite subscription, multiple video devices (mobile phones, tablets) and 5) the art of creating video content.

     

    The course will not only present the current television and video market, but also allow the student to explore the past and future trends for video distribution.  The student will also be able to learn the art of creating content, and then process how to sell that video in an ever changing media landscape.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  BUS 220  
    Offered in the Fall Semester

  
  •  

    MNG 451 - Health Care Industry Analysis


    The course introduces students to the historical development, structure, operation, current and future directions of the major components of the American health care delivery system. It examines the ways in which health care services are organized and delivered, the influences that impact health care public policy decisions, factors that determine the allocation of health care resources and the establishment of priorities, and the relationship of health care costs to measurable benefits.

    The United States has a unique system of health care delivery compared with other developed countries around the world. Almost all other developed countries have universal health insurance programs in which government plays a dominant role. Almost all of the citizens of other developed nations are entitled to receive health care services that include routine and basic health care. In the United States, the Affordable Care Act (ACA), has expanded health insurance, but it still falls short of achieving universal coverage. Besides insurance, adequate access to health care services and health care costs at both the individual and national levels continue to confound academics, policy makers, and politicians alike. While access has increased it remains far short of universal coverage, and the cost of health care continue to rise.

    Course materials are drawn largely from the required text, supplemented y articles from the current literature. As appropriate, factual information is presented in its social, political and economic contexts to enhance understanding of he forces that shape the system and the evolving mandates for change.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester

  
  •  

    MNG 453 - Management of Health Care Organization


    To provide an introduction to managing health organizations, focusing on strategies for creating a productive work environment. It provides an overview of managerial roles and techniques, as well as leadership styles, with an emphasis on the current challenges of health services management.
    Special emphasis will be placed on defining the organizational and personal competencies required to lead and manage health care organizations today and tomorrow.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered during Special Sessions
  
  •  

    MNG 463 - Independent Study


    Students undertake an advanced, specialized study project not covered by regular course offerings and participate in individual conferences with a faculty member to plan, execute, and discuss the project.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing and Permission of Chair
    Not Liberal Arts Open to Seniors Only Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MNG 465 - Management Internship


    Students carry out a work project in a private or public sector organization under the direct supervision of a designated faculty member and executive. Students meet on a regular basis with other interns and a faculty member to discuss findings and common problems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing and Permission of Chair
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MNG 491 - Special Topics in Management


    In-depth coverage of a selected topic in management.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1, 2, or 3
    Not liberal arts.
    Offered when needed.

Marketing

  
  •  

    BUS 240 - Principles of Marketing


    An introduction to the nature, purpose and functions of marketing. The course will review the activities and decisions involved in directing the flow of need-satisfying products and services to consumers. Topics include strategic and marketing planning, marketing research, the marketing environment, consumer behavior, market segmentation, product development, pricing, promotion, distribution, and international marketing.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing
    Not Liberal Arts
    Written Intensive
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MKT 301 - Consumer Behavior


    A comprehensive study of the cultural, social, personal and psychological factors which influence consumers’ search for and evaluation, purchase, use and disposition of goods and services. Managerial implications for segmentation, positioning, product development and marketing communications will be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MKT 302 - Personal Selling and Sales Management


    Study of the personal selling process and sales force management activities, including principles and techniques of professional selling; sales-force strategy and structure; recruitment, selection, training, compensation and supervision of salespeople.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: BUS 240 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MKT 307 - Marketing Communications


    A comprehensive study of the different forms of promotion, including advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, public relations, and direct and digital marketing. Students will examine their use in developing and implementing integrated marketing communications programs to influence attitudes and behavior of selected audiences, as part of the overall marketing strategy.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MKT 319 - Sports Marketing


    A study of the application of basic marketing concepts to the field of sports and leisure organizations. Topics include the sport consumer, research in sport marketing, the sport product, sports promotion and public relations, and future trends in sports marketing.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MKT 330 - Market Research


    An overview of the entire marketing research process, including problem definition, research design, use of secondary data, primary data collection, questionnaire design, sampling, fieldwork, basic data analysis, and reporting of findings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 210 , BUS 240 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MKT 350 - Global Fashion Marketing


    Students will be introduced to the dynamic global business of fashion. Topics include: product development; marketing decisions and retail strategies for women’s, men’s and children’s apparel and accessories; global sourcing; ethical considerations; fashion trends; and emerging market sectors. Careers in the fashion industry will be explored in detail. This course can be used as a Marketing or International Business major elective.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
  
  •  

    MKT 360 - Global Entertainment Marketing


    This course examines the concepts and practical application of marketing principles in the fields of professional entertainment, including music, film, TV, video games, sports, and performing arts. The course combines readings, lectures, online research, case studies and project report writing to help students better understand the marketing imperative in today’s diverse, global entertainment marketplace. This course can be used as a Marketing or International Business major elective.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
  
  •  

    MKT 371 - Global Internet Marketing


    This course examines how companies and not-for-profit organizations can use the Internet to conduct business around the world. Using an Internet-based format that promotes interactive learning, the course discusses the Internet as a platform for marketing research, marketing planning, product design, pricing, distribution, marketing communications, and online customer relationship marketing. This course can be used as a Marketing or International Business major elective.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
  
  •  

    MKT 385 - Global Green Marketing


    Students will investigate the growing field of “green” marketing from a global perspective. Topics include: sustainable business strategy; green product design, branding, and packaging; green advertising and marketing communications; pricing and distribution of eco-friendly goods and services; and marketing of environmental organizations and ideas. Emphasis will be placed on the role and power of consumers to shape a sustainable society through their purchasing, consumption, and disposal behavior. This course can be used as a Marketing or International Business major elective.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
  
  •  

    MKT 402 - Direct and Digital Marketing


    An intensive study of this fast growing form of marketing communication, which uses the Internet, direct mail, catalogs, TV infomercials, home shopping and telemarketing to interact directly with consumers. Students will explore the strategic, tactical, and control elements of direct and digital marketing in both consumer and business markets, and its role in the marketing mix. Topics include database marketing; online, viral and e-mail marketing; use of social media and mobile marketing; research, testing, and measurement of results.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MKT 403 - Retailing Management


    As an introduction to the field of retail management, this course emphasizes retailing as a marketing function and as a career. The course focuses on the retail environment, planning, buying and inventory management, store design and layout, retail pricing and promotion. It also looks at the new retailing formats which include non-store retailing, the impact of technology and recent trends in international retailing.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MKT 406 - Current Issues in Marketing


    Study of current and emerging marketing fields, trends and issues. The course will focus on a special topic or theme (e.g., green marketing, social and nonprofit marketing) during a particular semester, giving students the opportunity to study the subject matter in depth
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MKT 414 - International Marketing


    This course focuses on the formulation of marketing strategies for international operations. It analyzes decisions relating to selection of target market(s) and design of marketing programs suitable for marketing products and services in increasingly interdependent national markets. By emphasizing research of the cultural, economic and regulatory environments of business abroad, the course studies the challenges of adjusting and standardizing product, price, distribution and promotion, worldwide.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 240 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MKT 416 - International Advertising


    This course examines advertising from the perspective of the global marketer. It addresss the opportunities and challenges inherent in the successful transfer of advertising appeals, messages, art, copy, and other elements of an advertising campaign from one country to another. Strategic decisions relating to specification of advertising objectives, budgeting, media planning, and agency selection are given particular attention. This course can be used as a Marketing or International Business major elective.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MKT 418 - Import and Export Management


    This course provides an in-depth examination of the export and import processes, focusing on the activities that firms need to undertake and prepare for entering the international marketplace. It discusses the basic motivations to internationalize, information and financial concerns of firms beginning to internationalize their operations, and various strategic issues affecting export and import development. Case studies and hands-on team projects are utilized to highlight product, price, distribution, and promotion decision-making for exports and imports in a variety of business situations. This course can be used as a Marketing or International Business major elective.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MKT 414  or (BUS 240  and BEC 325 )
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MKT 460 - Marketing Strategy and Planning


    A study of the process of strategy formulation in marketing. This course emphasizes the integration of knowledge from all previous courses in marketing and related disciplines. Topics include planning and development of policies, implementation and evaluation of the entire marketing strategy. Case analyses and/or simulation games are employed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 240 , MKT 301 , MKT 307 , MKT 330 , MKT 414  and senior status
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MKT 463 - Independent Study in Marketing


    Students undertake an advanced, specialized study project not covered by the regular course offerings. Students participate in individual conferences with a faculty member to plan, execute, and discuss the project.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MKT 465 - Marketing Internship


    Students carry out a work project in a private or public sector organization under the direct supervision of a designated faculty member and executive. Students meet on a regular basis with other interns and a faculty member to discuss findings and common problems.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing and approval of Internship Coordinator
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring Offered in the Summer
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MKT 491 - Special Topics in Marketing


    In-depth coverage of a selected topic in marketing.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1, 2, or 3
    Not liberal arts.
    Offered when needed.

Media & Strategic Communication

  
  •  

    CDS 1139 - Freelance Journalism


    This course explores the field of freelance journalism as a secondary career or part-time occupation. Basics of research, writing, copy preparation and editing are imparted through hands-on exercises and case studies. Techniques of marketing one’s writing are also discussed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
  •  

    MSC 200 - Introduction to Media & Strategic Communication


    An overview of the process of mass communication and the mass media. The difference between human communication and mass communication; the elements, functions, impact and effects of mass communication; the profile of broadcasting, film, journalism, advertising and public relations; careers in mass communication. Recommended to be taken prior to other Mass Communication courses.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 210 - Introduction to Advertising


    A survey of the field of advertising as an activity of human communication emphasizing the concepts of creation, coordination and control of the advertising function.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 213 - Introduction to Public Relations


    A study of public relations as an organized body of knowledge and a professional discipline examining the techniques of communication, methods, media, and other areas of public relations expertise.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 225 - Introduction to Digital Media & Production


    This course is designed to survey the technology and regulation of broadcasting in the United States, as well as provide an in-depth examination, through discussion and practical application, of the structural and operational models within the broadcasting, cable and new media industries, as well as survey the various career opportunities therein.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  MSC 200  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 230 - Digital Literacy and Practice


    A practical course examining and applying current communications technologies and strategies to enable students to develop and produce effective communications vehicles of the caliber and nature used in the mass communication field. The course will deal with blog and Web site creation, social media, presentation tools, audio and video production and strategy development. Includes software and technical training.  For MSC majors only or by permission.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 275 - Introduction to Multiplatform Journalism


    The history, philosophies, ethics, and practices of the press with emphasis on newspapers. Basic news and feature writing, as well as copy editing techniques will be stressed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 300 - Media Law and Ethics


    The legal and ethical issues related to the practice of mass communication: Federal and State laws regulating the media; freedom of information, libel, privacy, access, copyright, obscenity, advertising and broadcast regulation; ethical issues and problems related to the media; social responsibility and self-regulation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite MSC 200  and Sophomore standing or higher
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 305 - Creative Advertising Strategy


    An examination of the central place of strategy in developing advertising campaigns. The role of the account executive and this person’s relationship to both the client and other departments within the advertising agency are thoroughly explored. Case studies that provide insight into various ways in which companies solve advertising problems receive prominent attention. Lessons from the case studies are used to develop hypothetical strategies meant to guide creative advertising executions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 210  
    Written Intensive
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    MSC 311 - Organizational Communication


    Study of the role, function and use of communication within business and non-profit organizations: the assessment of communication needs in organizations; planning of communication programs and activities; choice and use of different media and evaluation of communication programs.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 213  
    Offered When Needed
 

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