2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Sep 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

Arts & Science Shared Courses

  
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    CDS 1117 - Person to Person: Small Group Interaction


    We are always communicating and operating in group situations: dyads, families, committees, managerial teams, athletic teams, departments, etc. Using a family systems approach, this course will explore how our current behavior, verbal and non-verbal, is directly influenced by our first and primary group experience i.e., your families of origin. Students should come to class with available pictures of themselves and their families of origin.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
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    CDS 1148 - Victims


    This course identifies the needs of victims of child abuse, domestic violence, rape, and mugging. Among topics to be discussed in this course are the effects on the victims, counseling techniques for victims, existing precautionary measures, and the criminal/abuser.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered in the Fall Semester Weekend Intensive
  
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    CDS 1152 - Searching for Patterns


    Students will learn to identify common patterns and connections between seemingly unrelated concepts, ideas, and disciplines. Topics in the arts, humanities, social science, and STEM will be considered. This course will look at the shared threads that link these areas into a cohesive whole, fundamental to the human perception of the world. Emphases on ideation, creativity, exploration, collaboration, and problem-solving - all essential ingredients for success in the workplace and in society.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CDS 1161 - Library Information Systems: Principles and Procedures


    Accessing information systems is an important part of an undergraduate education. This course will prepare the student to develop research strategies necessary for college assignments and life-long learning. The course will enable students to gain expertise in the use of online catalogues, periodicals, indices and abstracts, and basic reference works in the various disciplines.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
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    CDS 1183 - The Biology of Human Aging


    Aging: Why, how, and what can we do about it? This course will review the phenomena associated with human aging at the anatomic, physiologic, cellular and molecular levels and will explore the current understanding of the underlying mechanisms for age-related biological changes. The course will include lecture, Internet-based reading assignments, online streaming audio listening assignments, and class discussions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CDS 1184 - Developmental Disabilities


    This one credit course will introduce students to the field of developmental disabilities (DD). The broad range of DD diagnoses will be explored (e.g., autism, mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy etc.), and relevant support and service systems will be examined. Students will be introduced to the theoretical concepts of person-centered planning, self-advocacy, family support and the contemporary guiding principles of independence, productivity, inclusion, self-determination and integration.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
  
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    CDS 1196 - Special Topics


    Occasionally topics of particular current interest will be offered through the one-credit, intensive weekend format.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
  
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    CDS 1197 - Special Topics


    Occasionally topics of particular current interest will be offered through the two-credit format.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
  
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    CDS 1198 - Special Topics


    Occasionally topics of particular current interest will be offered through the three-credit format.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    CDS 1199 - Special Topics


    Topical course of particular current interest offered as needed which may be taught in a one to four credit format at the discretion of the professor(s) and as warranted by the topic(s) covered. Please see the individual course syllabi for further information about the particular course.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
  
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    CDS 1201 - Tutoring Hours


    This course provides students with two hours of structured tutoring support each week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Department Consent Required
  
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    CDS 1202 - Gael Chat: Social Communication


    This course will provide students with the tools necessary for effective communication across various settings. Students will be taught important social skills and are given the opportunity to practice these skills at each class. Course topics include: how to start, enter, and exit conversations, how to appropriately use humor and assess humor feedback, making and keeping friendships and other types of relationships, how to handle arguments and disagreements, and how to manage rejection, teasing, bullying, and rumors/gossip.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Department Consent Required
  
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    CDS 1203 - IC Success: Academic Skills and Strategies


    In this course, students will be introduced to skills and strategies for academic success. Students will develop self-awareness about their study habits’ strengths and weaknesses; enhance and strengthen their study and time management habits; self-evaluate their work practices and learning styles and performance throughout the semester.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Department Consent Required
  
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    CDS 2220 - Transformations of Myth through Time


    A video course. This course explores how myths reconcile human beings to the mysteries of life. How have they changed throughout history from culture to culture? In this video course Joseph Campbell, the noted scholar, teacher, author and storyteller, explores the origins and meanings of the world’s mythologies, folklures and religions. 13 one-hour video programs.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Undergraduate Trimester Programs
    Offered When Needed
  
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    COL 150 - Columba Cornerstone


    The Columba Cornerstone is a freshman seminar that introduces students to foundational ideas, perspectives, and techniques of inquiry that are essential to the college experience. The Cornerstone examines time-honored questions in the liberal arts through the themes of Truth, Justice, and Earth. Using these themes to focus on the reading, writing, and thinking skills crucial to success both in college and beyond, students will explore questions about the nature of knowing, dive deeply into analyses of identities, and probe the many dimensions of human interrelatedness. Grounded firmly in the mission statement of the Core Curriculum, the Columba Cornerstone will introduce students to critical concerns of our time such as diversity and sustainability in a digitally and globally connected world. Motivated by the values and goals of peace, justice, and service, the Cornerstone will utilize classic and contemporary texts, co-curricular engagements, and a variety of pedagogues to consider new approaches to traditional problems and cutting-edge insights for the 21st century. All sections of the Columba Cornerstone, regardless of theme (i.e., Truth, Justice, Earth) incorporate instruction on six topics which have been designed to ground students in essential learning that supports the entirety of their Iona experience. These topics include: The Iona Story, Diversity, Information and Digital Literacy, The Learning e-Portfolio, Entrepreneurship and Innovation, and basic Financial Literacy.

    When taught in the fall semester, the Columba Cornerstone is “linked” with another course (and instructor) to form a Learning Community. As a Learning Community, the course instructors work in collaboration to foster an environment of integrated learning for the shared group of students who travel together between the two courses.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Columba Cornerstone Course Offered in Fall & Spring

  
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    COL 150G - Columba Cornerstone Gael Hour


    The Columba Cornerstone GAEL Hour (COL 150G)  is applicable only to students who took COL 150 in Fall Semester 2016 or Spring Semester 2017. The GAEL Hour, a one-credit academic unit designed to ground students in essential learning that supports the entirety of their Iona experience. GAEL Hour Learning Modules address The Iona Story, Diversity, Information & Digital Literacy, e-Portfolio, and Financial Literacy. Students who still need to complete this course do so in a distance-learning format.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed
  
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    DH 210 - Introduction to Public History and Digital Humanities


    This is a foundational course in Public History and Digital Humanities. This class introduces these two related scholarly and professional fields from an interdisciplinary perspective. We will use an  interdisciplinary perspective to look at the development of both public history and digital humanities individually and then explore how the connections between the two - shared tools, outlooks, and goals - can support understanding and participation in a wide range of current issues in American society, from information and media literacy to civic engagement.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    DH 492 - Public History and Digital Humanities Internship


    This course explores how public historical memory shapes our understanding of the past. We will examine how interpretations of historical events are expressed through varied media and formats of public history and digital humanities. This internship encompasses a wide range of forms and spaces in which historical knowledge is brought to life and communicated to present-day audiences. Students will participate with local and national historical institutions and organizations and gain practical, experiential experience in public history and digital humanities.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: DH 210  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    DS 100 - Data Science and Society


    This course will provide students with a foundation of data science, relate it to modern-day scientific, political, economic, and cultural institutions and communities, and enable students to use data responsibly and ethically. It will focus on techniques used to interpret, manipulate, visualize, and extract insight from data, using statistical methods and programming. Students will work with a variety of real-life data. Essential to many fields and career goals, this course will provide an important entrance to the relationship between data science and other pathways of learning.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    ENV 300 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies


    This course is an interdisciplinary course that examines some of the key problems, debates, and issues in environmental studies. Topics will explore select areas of investigation including but not limited to climate change, food security, and international environmental cooperation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    ENV 452 - Colloquium in Environmental Studies


    This course provides a broad, practical understanding of some of the most pressing and relevant problems in environmental studies. The course is designed to provide an interdisciplinary perspective on contemporary environmental challenges.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: Environmental Studies majors only and approval of program coordinators
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
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    ENV 495 - Capstone Seminar in Environmental Studies


    This course is a survey and integration of the disciplines that compromise the program focusing on particular problems and/or issues in environmental studies. The course will provide the opportunity for majors to critically review concepts, theories, approaches, and the literature pertinent to the topic under review and to engage in independent, original, and rigorous research.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Environmental Studies majors only and approval of program coordinators
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
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    HON 101 - Honors Humanities Seminar I


    The Honors Seminar is part of the Honors Program’s core curriculum. It is an interdisciplinary program which is designed to introduce students to the central concepts of philosophy, literature, history, and religious studies. The purpose of the course is to develop critical skills and qualities of mind necessary to a liberal education. This is done by introducing students to major writings in the humanities and by encouraging them to think about and discuss the ideas addressed in these works. This seminar involves mainly a multi-disciplinary exploration of the period that scholars usually designate as the ‘Ancient World.’ Students will develop the critical thinking, communication, and writing skills essential for a liberal arts education by engaging with course texts in class discussions, written assignments, and oral presentations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Approval Required. Honors Program Course Offered in the Fall Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
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    HON 102 - Honors Humanities Seminar II


    The Honors Seminar is part of the Honors Program’s core curriculum. It is an interdisciplinary program which is designed to introduce students to the central concepts of philosophy, literature, history, and religious studies. The purpose of the course is to develop critical skills and qualities of mind necessary to a liberal education. This is done by introducing students to major writings in the humanities and by encouraging them to think about and discuss the ideas addressed in these works. This seminar involves mainly a multi-disciplinary exploration of the period that scholars usually designate as the ‘Medieval Period.’ As in HON 101 , students will continue to develop the critical thinking, communication, and writing skills essential for a liberal arts education by engaging with course texts in class discussions, written assignments, and oral presentations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: HON 101 
    Department Approval Required. Honors Program Course Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    HON 103 - Honors Internship


    Internships for honors students in a variety of academic or career-related fields are pursued for academic credit. An internship proposal is subject to the approval of the Honors Program Director in consultation with the department in the area of the internship. The number of credits provided (1-3) may depend on the number of hours being worked and/or the quality of the work experience. This will be determined by the Honors Program Director in consultation with the faculty member supervising the internship. Conferences with the faculty, research reports and other requirements as determined by the faculty will supplement the student’s practical experience.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: HON 101 
    Department Consent Required
  
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    HON 109 - Communication Skills: Composition for Honors Degree Program


    An advanced writing course, required of all students in the Honors Program. Through challenging readings drawn from the humanities, social and natural sciences, and business, students will review the strategies of exposition, argument, and research that are essential to college-level inquiry. Using an approach to writing that proceeds recursively through the stages of drafting and revision, students will develop their ability to present substantive and balanced arguments, written in clear and convincing prose.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Approval Required.
    Honors Program Course
    Offered in the Fall and Spring.
    Department Consent Required
  
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    HON 112 - Logic, Rhetoric, and Writing


    An interdisciplinary approach to composition and logic, combining two of the most important skills Honors students will need in pursuit of their majors. Half of the incoming Honors cohort will take the composition section of the course for the first eight weeks, while the other half take the logic section. Those students will then “flip” sections after eight weeks, thus spending an equal amount of time during the semester on both composition and logic. Through challenging readings drawn from the humanities, social and natural sciences, and business, students will review the strategies of exposition, argument, and research that are essential to college-level inquiry, as well as the basics of symbolic (formal) logic. Using an approach to writing that proceeds recursively through the stages of drafting and revision, and cultivating the analytic skills to construct and evaluate arguments symbolically, students will develop their ability to present substantive and balanced arguments, write in clear and convincing prose, as well as an appreciation for rigorous analytical thinking.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Approval Required. Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
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    HON 201 - Honors Humanities Seminar III


    The Honors Seminar is part of the Honors Program’s core curriculum. It is an interdisciplinary program which is designed to introduce students to the central concepts of philosophy, literature, history, and religious studies. The purpose of the course is to develop critical skills and qualities of mind necessary to a liberal education. This is done by introducing students to major writings in the humanities and by encouraging them to think about and discuss the ideas addressed in these works. This seminar involves mainly a multi-disciplinary exploration of the period that scholars usually designate as the ‘Modern World.’ As in HON 101  and HON 102 , students will continue to develop the critical thinking, communication, and writing skills essential for a liberal arts education by engaging with course texts in class discussions, written assignments, and oral presentations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: HON 101 
    Department Approval Required. Honors Program Course Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    HON 202 - Honors Humanities Seminar IV


    The Honors Seminar is part of the Honors Program’s core curriculum. It is an interdisciplinary program which is designed to introduce students to the central concepts of philosophy, literature, history, and religious studies. The purpose of this course is to develop critical skills and qualities of mind necessary to a liberal education. This is done by providing students with a multi-disciplinary exploration of the period that can loosely be called “The Contemporary Age.” Students are given the change to study key texts from the nineteenth century to the present day that both reflected and shaped the development of today’s world. In the process, the course seeks to provide a critical appreciation of the artistic, literary, philosophical, theological, and historical trends that defined the contemporary era. It is also intended to serve as the culmination of the humanities sequence, and will encourage students to consider how the intellectual, cultural, and religious currents of this period relate to those covered in HON 101 , HON 102 , and HON 201 . Furthermore, students will continue to develop the critical thinking, communication, and writing skills essential for a liberal arts education by engaging with course texts in class discussions, written assignments, and oral presentations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: HON 101  
    Department Approval Required. Honors Program Course Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    HON 302 - Guided Honors Thesis Research I


    This course is an independent study during which Honors students in the Spring semester of their Junior year begin the research which will culminate in their Senior Honors Thesis. Under the guidance of their thesis advisor the student will begin their research as outlined in their Thesis Proposal. This is a highly individualized process and the assignments and expectations of the course are determined by each Thesis Advisor.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: HON 101  
    Honors Program Course Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    HON 320 - Junior Honors Colloquium


    The seminar introduces students to the research methods of various disciplines in order to prepare them for their upcoming thesis proposal and research. Students will read and discuss articles and essays from a range of disciplines in terms of the structure, methodology, and content of each piece. The seminar will also introduce students to the basics of independent research, including abstract and proposal writing, presenting ideas to a group, constructing a research plan, organizing, and synthesizing information, and producing a viable thesis. A portion of the course will also be devoted to aspects of professional development, including: presenting work, applying for prestigious grants/scholarships, post-undergraduate opportunities, and so on.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: HON 101 
    Department Approval Required. Honors Program Course Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    HON 391 - Special Topics in Honors


    Special courses designed for Honors students and non-Honors students who meet the following requirements (recommended by the Chair of their major department or the faculty member teaching the course; in their third+ semester of study; and have a GPA of 3.5 or higher). These courses will be offered periodically and provide honors students with opportunities to study a variety of topics, most likely interdisciplinary, although they may be focused on a particular field. These courses may be team-taught or offered by a single-faculty member. They will emphasize reading and discussion of primary texts, development of advanced writing, oral communication skills, and critical thinking. They may include experiential learning such as field trips. These courses will fulfill elective credits toward graduation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Consent Required
  
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    HON 401 - Honors Pro-Seminar


    In this course, juniors in the Honors Program will acquire the research skills and develop the research methodology of their individual disciplines. After successful completion of this course, the student will being work on their thesis with an individual thesis advisor.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  HON 101  
    Honors Program Course. Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    HON 402 - Guided Honors Thesis Research II


    This course is an independent study during which Honors students in the Fall semester of their senior year will finish the research and production of their Senior Honors Thesis. Under the guidance of their thesis advisor the student will conclude their research as outlined in their Thesis Proposal and started in the Spring of the junior year I HON 402 . This is a highly individualized process and the assignments and expectations of the course are determined by each Thesis Advisor.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite: HON 101 
    Honors Program Course Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    HON 410 - Senior Research for Honors Degree Program Studies


    A two-semester sequence culminating in the writing of an honors thesis. The student develops and explores a topic with a mentor of his or her choice and, upon completion, presents the thesis to students, faculty and parents. HON 410  is a 0 credit course taken during Spring of junior year. Students will be given a grade of P/F at the end of the semester. HON 420  is a 3 credit course taken during Fall of senior year. The student’s thesis advisor is listed as the faculty of record for this course.
    Lecture
    Credits: 0
    Prerequisite: HON 101 
    Department Approval Required. Honors Program Course Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    HON 420 - Senior Research for Honors Degree Program Studies


    A two-semester sequence culminating in the writing of an honors thesis. The student develops and explores a topic with a mentor of his or her choice and, upon completion, presents the thesis to students, faculty and parents. HON 410  is a 0 credit course taken during Spring of junior year. Students will be given a grade of P/F at the end of the semester. HON 420  is a 3 credit course taken during Fall of senior year. The student’s thesis advisor is listed as the faculty of record for this course.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: HON 101 
    Department Approval Required. Honors Program Course Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    HUM 102 - Honors Humanities Seminar II


    Honors humanities seminar that covers the Medieval World. (Course fulfills 3 credits of the Humanities core curriculum.)
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Approval Required. Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
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    HUM 202 - Honors Humanities Seminar IV


    Honors Humanities Seminar that covers the Nineteenth and Twenith Centuries. (Course fulfills 3 credits of the Humanities core curriculum.)
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Department Consent Required
  
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    IDS 390 - Data Science Capstone


    This course will be a culminating experience for students that will provide an opportunity to study and discuss the design and implementation of a project under the direction of a faculty mentor in their discipline and the guidance of a faculty member with expertise in data science. The project will draw upon the knowledge and skills students obtained in the sequence of data science courses. Students will work individually or in teams to engage in the entire process of solving a real-world data science problem, including reviewing relevant studies, collecting and processing actual data, applying appropriate analytic methods, considering ethical implications, and visualizing and presenting the result of their research in a public forum.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    CS 465   and secured mentor from student’s discipline
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    IDS 440 - Study Abroad Passport


    Independent Study
    Credits: 6
  
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    WST 201 - Women in the United States: In the Family, at the Workplace, and in Political Life


    This interdisiciplinary course will focus on the multiple and changing roles of women. Common concerns such as healthcare and the legal and economic status of women in the United States will be explored, along with the influence of race, cultural and class backgrounds. Students will investigate a range of disciplinary approaches to the study of women’s lives and use these tools of analysis to reflect on their experiental knowledge of women.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    WST 208 - Women and Art


    An ‘art appreciation’ approach to the major issues and the vast body of artworks of women artists throughout the history of art. Examines the impact of “female creative energy” on artistic traditions, with an emphasis on 20th Century works. An exploration into the depths of technical innovation, iconographic originality, and artistic influence and status of women in contemporary culture through selected readings, film, and slide study, research and discussion. Required NYC museum and gallery visits.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    WST 275 - Women in Dance


    The course examines the contributions and innovations of women a choreographers, dancers, and dance educators and dance critics. Focus is placed on how women have shaped the creation and profile of dance as an art form the Western thearte and what informs their artistic vision. Further consideration will be given to how society has evaluated, viewed and at time directed the role of women in this disicpline. Students will attend two concerts; one in New York City and one at Iona College. Coursework involves lecture, discussion and viewing of dance works.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    WST 307 - Psychology of Women


    This course examines the scientific evidence regarding sexual differences and the controversies about these differences. Crucial issues affecting contemporary women and the women’s movement are examined from a psychological perspective.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    WST 324 - Sex Roles in Modern Societies


    Study of sex roles in the contemporary United States; emphasis will be placed on changing patterns of socialization, cross-cultural comparisons and historical development, class, race and subcultural variations, the effects of urbanism and industrialization, the feminist movement and change toward redefinition of sex roles.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    WST 334 - Gender Differences in Human Communication


    This course explores differences in the strategies employed by females and males in intrapersonal, interpersonal and group communication.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SCS 101  or equivalent
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Oral Intensive. Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    WST 337 - Gender and Politics


    This course examines the role of gender in American politics. The word, gender, includes more than biological differences between men and women, and includes how the public interprets these differences and values some qualities over others. Elections are highly gendered, how we interpret political behavior is influenced strongly by gendered language (metaphors of war and professional sports), and our expectations about the characteristics, behavior, and appearance of political actors are shaped by gender. Current research on gender differences in seeking public office, and the influence of gender on the political behavior of elected officials will be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester Alternate Years
  
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    WST 409 - Females in Crime and Delinquency


    This course examines the myths and realties concerning females in crime and delinquency. It includes analysis of causes of deciance, types of involvement and treatment of females in the justice system (law, courts, prison and parole) with an emphasis on current research findings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years

Arts & Science

  
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    BST 101 - Black Cultural Identity, Past & Present


    This interdisciplinary course provides an overview of the global black experience through an examination of the roots, culture, and politics of the modern world with an emphasis on the ideas of black social thought, political protests, and social change. The course is organized chronologically, covering the historical foundations and backgrounds of people of African descent throughout the diaspora, classic works in Black Studies with emphasis on continuities among African peoples worldwide, and the social forces that have shaped contemporary life, and particularly black life, in Africa and the Americas.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester

Business Courses Shared

  
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    BUS 100 - Introduction to Business


    This course provides valuable insight to students beginning their studies in the LaPenta School of Business.  Students will be involved throughout the course in activities designed to enhance their ability to succeed in both college and a career. These will include case studies, self-assessment, career development,  research,  communication and related personal skills important in business.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    BUS 100  Antirequisite: Not open to students who have taken IDS 110  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    BUS 115 - Personal Financial Planning and Management


    The course provides a practical, student-friendly introduction to personal financial planning and management. It focuses on guiding the students to important financial decisions such as saving and investment, managing loans, filing taxes, buying insurance, dealing with credit cards and consumer loans and planning for the future. While doing so, it introduces students to key financial concepts such as the time value of money, interest rate, compounding, rate of return, and risk which will help them to grasp the outcome of their financial decisions and effectively manage their finances on the day to day basis as well from the long-term perspective.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    BUS 201 - Principles of Financial Accounting


    An introduction to the nature and purpose of accounting; the content, classification and preparation of financial statements; the procedures and records used in the recording of business transactions; the nature, measurement and analysis of assets, liabilities, stockholders’ equity, revenues, expenses and cash flows.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 465 - Business Internship II


    Students are placed in a public or private business organization under the direct supervision of an executive of the organization. Students meet with a faculty member to plan, execute and discuss the internship related issues and findings of the project. Pass/Fail
    Internship
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisites: Senior status, permission of department chair, previously completed one of the following courses: FIN 465 , IS 465 , MNG 465 , or MKT 465 .
    Not Liberal Arts
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    BUS 491 - Special Topics in Business


    In-depth coverage of a selected topic in business.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1, 2, or 3
    Not liberal arts.
    Offered when needed.

Accounting

  
  •  

    ACC 305 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Conceptual framework and accounting standards, accounting system and recording procedures; elements and format of the balance sheet, income statement and statement of cash flows; valuation and reporting of cash, receivables, inventories and cost of goods sold, property, plant and equipment and depreciation, intangibles and depletion, current liabilities and contingencies. Additional laboratory hour required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 202 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ACC 310 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Time value of money; valuation and reporting of bonds payable and long-term notes, corporate capital and dividends; earnings per share, capital structure and dilutive securities; revenue recognition, income taxes and operating losses, accounting changes and error analysis; preparation of the statement of cash flows; full disclosure and financial statement analysis. Additional laboratory hour required. Not open to students who have completed ACC 204.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ACC 305 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ACC 315 - Cost Measurement and Analysis


    A study of costing systems including activity-based costing; the classification, reporting, estimation and allocation of costs; flexible budgets and standards, revenue analysis,transfer pricing and the role of the controller. Additional laboratory hour required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 202 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ACC 316 - Advanced Financial Accounting


    A study of the accounting for business combinations, acquisitions and consolidations (wholly owned and less-than wholly owned), inter-company transactions, partnership accounting and multinational accounting issues.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: ACC 310 
    Not Liberal Arts
  
  •  

    ACC 330 - Analysis of Financial Statements


    A study of financial statements; analytical techniques and financing and investing activities; credit, equity and profitability analysis; analysis of return on investment, earnings and cash flows; and prospective analysis and business combinations. Not open to Accounting majors.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 202 
    Not Open to Accounting Majors Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ACC 333 - Forensic Accounting


    The course in Forensic accounting Involves the application of special skills such as accounting, auditing procedures, finance, quantitative methods, research, and investigations. It also involves knowledge of certain areas of the law. This knowledge combined with these skills enable forensic accountants to collect, analyze, and evaluate evidential matter and to interpret and communicate findings. Forensic accounting requires special skills that are not required of accountants in general; however the AICPA and other Accounting organizations set standards in the forensic accounting profession. Forensic means pertaining to the law. Forensic accounting deals with financial issues that may come before a trier of fact in a court of law or other venue (such as arbitration). Especially important to forensic accounting is evidential matter that may bear on the truth or falsity of an assertion made before a trier of fact.  In many cases, forensic accounts interpret evidence and communicate expert opinions for clients and a trier of fact.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:BUS 201  and BUS 202  
    Offered in the Fall Semester. Not Liberal Arts
  
  •  

    ACC 381 - Accounting Software - Quickbooks


    This course is a hands-on introduction to accounting software using the Quickbooks accounting program. Students will learn how to set up a chart of accounts, make entries, set up vendors and customers, handle file operations and prepare a set of financial statements, as well as use some of the other functionality within the program.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: BUS 201 
    Not Liberal Arts
  
  •  

    ACC 383 - Accounting Software - Microsoft Dynamics


    This course is a hands-on introduction to accounting software using the Microsoft Dynamics accounting program. Students will learn how to set up a chart of accounts, make entries, set up vendors and customers, handle file operations and prepare a set of financial statements, as well as use some of the other functionality within the program.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: BUS 201 
    Not Liberal Arts
  
  •  

    ACC 405 - Federal Income Taxation I


    A study of federal income taxation of individuals; filing status and dependents; income inclusions and exclusions; personal, investment and business related deductions; property transacations and gains and losses; tax credits, computation and payment; and review of applicable Internal Revenue Code provisions and regulations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 202 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    ACC 410 - Federal Income Taxation II


    A study of federal income taxation of corporations and partnerships; formation, capital contributions and distributions, liquidations, and reorganizations; consolidated returns; S corporations and personal holding companies; and review of applicable Internal Revenue Code provisions and regulations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ACC 405 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ACC 411 - Government and Nonprofit Accounting


    A study of accounting principles and financial reporting for state and local government units and non-profit health care and educational entities; transaction accounting and fund types; auditing requirements and regulatory, budgeting and taxation issues.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ACC 310 
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ACC 413 - Advanced Financial Accounting


    Nature of pensions, reporting expense and minimum liability, other post-retirement benefits; leases and accounting by lessees and lessors, special leasing situations; investments in debt and equity securities, holding period and equity method; purchase method of business combinations, acquisition and inter-company transactions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Corequisite: ACC 310 
  
  •  

    ACC 420 - Auditing Principles and Procedures


    Role of the public accountant, professional standards and ethics and auditor legal liability; audit planning, evaluation of risk and internal control and designing audit programs; audit evidence and documentation, testing and sampling; audit procedures for assets, liabilities and operations; completing the audit and preparing reports.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ACC 413  or Senior Standing
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ACC 463 - Independent Study in Accounting


    Students undertake an advanced specialized study project not covered by the regular course offerings. Students participate in individual conferences with a faculty member to plan, execute and discuss the findings of the project.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 1
    Not Liberal Arts Open to Seniors Only Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ACC 465 - Accounting Internship


    This course awards credit for approved internships in accounting that allows the student hands-on experience applying the knowledge, tools and techniques that were learned in the accounting classes. This will broaden the student’s skill set and add to their ability to be a better employee upon graduation.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 201  
    Offered Fall, Winter, Spring & Summer
  
  •  

    ACC 482 - Tax Software - Lacerte


    This course is a hands-on introduction to tax software using the Lacerte tax program. Students will learn how to set up the preparer file, enter client accounts, input general information, enter revenue and income items, enter loss and expense items, tax credit items, prepare supporting schedules, and print the return for filing with the respective taxing bodies.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: ACC 405 
    Not Liberal Arts
  
  •  

    ACC 483 - Tax Software - Pro Systems


    This course is a hands-on introduction to tax software using the Pro Systems tax program. Students will learn how to set up the preparer file, enter client accounts, input general information, enter revenue and income items, enter loss and expense items, tax credit items, prepare supporting schedules, and print the return for filing with the respective taxing bodies.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: ACC 405 
    Not Liberal Arts
  
  •  

    ACC 491 - Special Topics in Accounting


    In-depth coverage of a selected topic in accounting.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1, 2, or 3
    Not liberal arts.
    Offered when needed.
  
  •  

    BUS 202 - Principles of Managerial Accounting


    An introduction to the role of accounting in an organization; the classification, behavior, estimation, accumulation, assignment and reporting of costs; the use of accounting data for analyzing, planning and controlling operations, evaluating performance and as a basis for managerial decision making.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 201 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    IDS 300 - Business Communications


    A study of the theory and practice of effective oral and written communication skills in a business environment; skill development through the use of videotaping and other technology; demonstration of proficiency in writing, speaking, and listening required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ENG 120 
    Offered When Needed

Biology

  
  •  

    BIO 100 - Foundations of Biology


    This course is a one-semester lecture course for students who are planning to major in Biology or another science but were not placed into General Biology (Bio 101).  This course is designed to prepare students with limited background in the sciences and mathematics to succeed later in more advanced courses, including Bio 101.  The course will focus on developing writing, quantitative, and critical analysis skills as well as provide proficiency in the scientific method as well as a broad understanding of basic biological concepts.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIO 101 - General Biology 1


    An introduction to the science of life.  Biology as a science, the molecules of life, the cellular basis of life, energy transformation, signaling, the nature of the gene and its action, and an introduction into basic genetics will be covered in this first semester of a year-long sequence in introductory biology for biology majors.
    3 hr lecture; 2 hr lab; 1 hr recitation
    Credits: 4.5
    Offered in the Fall Semester.
    Written Intensive
  
  •  

    BIO 102 - General Biology 2


    The course is the second semester of a year-long introductory course designed for Biology majors.  During this semester, Mendelian genetics, evolution, a survey of organisms, and animal anatomy and physiology will be emphasized in addition to an introduction to ecology. 
    3 hr lecture; 2 hr lab; 1 hr recitation
    Credits: 4.5
    Prerequisite: BIO 101  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 108 - Body Structure and Function


    An introductory course in basic human anatomy and physiology. Topics to include the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory section of this course will involve the examination of human anatomical models and experiments in basic physiology. Students will make a presentation on a specialized topic.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 109 - General Biology 1 without Lab


    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIO 110 - General Biology 2 without Lab


    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIO 111 - Infectious Diseases


    The object of this course is to convey to students in any major field a sound and clear concept of the fundamentals of microbiology at the introductory level.  The main focus of this course will be the impact of microbes and infectious disease on society, nationally and globally. In conjunction with class instruction, the laboratory course work is designed to acquaint the beginning student with the techniques and discipline that are necessary for the performance of scientific work.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
  •  

    BIO 113 - The Biology of Poison, Murder, and Mayhem


    The goal of the course is to introduce the non-science major to the basic principles of toxicology.  Poisons have been used over the course of human history for a variety of good and evil purposes.  The content of the course will include a survey of toxic chemicals, health effects of toxic agents, principles of absorption and the chemical and biological factors that affect toxicity.  Special emphasis will be given to the impact of toxins on human health and the use of toxins as instruments of violence.  Applied disciplines of toxicity, forensic toxicology, biological warfare, mutagenesis, reproductive and developmental toxicology will also be discussed.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 115 - DNA and Biotechnology


    This course is designed to provide a stimulating introduction to the world of biotechnology. Starting with an overview of the basic concepts of molecular biology and genetics that serve as a foundation for biotechnology, the course will segue into the various applied fields of biotechnology. Topics will include microbial biotechnology, agricultural biotechnology, biofuels, cloning, bioremediation, medical biotechnology, DNA fingerprinting and forensics. The goal of this course is to provide the Biology non-majors with an appreciation of important biotechnology breakthroughs and the associated bioethics issues.  Three credits comprising two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    BIO 116 - The Brain in Health and Disease


    This course aims to introduce non-major students with no background in biology to the exciting field of neurobiology.  It is aimed at the non-science major with an interest in understanding how the biology of the nervous system: how the brain works, how it controls our bodies, and how it goes awry in disease.  This course will also introduce students to some of the latest advances in healing the brain using neural stem cells.  The course will cover how the cells that make up our brains function together, and how the brain is impacted in a number of brain disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Depression, Frontotemporal Dementias, and damage due to injury to specific brain regions.  The course will also expose students to cutting edge medical research and ethical dilemmas that may accompany these treatments.  Students will be required to research a neurological disease/disorder and prepare a written and oral presentation. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.  Fulfills core science requirement.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 118 - Microbiology and Disease


    Introduction to bacterial, viral, and eukaryotic microbes. Topics include microbial structure, classification, metabolism, growth, diseases, and general microbial laboratory techniques in the context of what is required in the medical field. This course is specifically designed for Nursing students.
    3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab
    Credits: 4
    Offered in Spring Semester.
    Offered in Special Sessions.
  
  •  

    BIO 120 - Introduction to Forensic Science


    This course introduces the field of forensic science through an exploration of its applications to criminal investigation.  Students will become familiar with select topics in forensic science as well as some of the physical, chemical, and instrumental methods used by forensic scientists to investigate evidence at the crime scene or in the laboratory.  Students will learn the methods of collection, preservation and documentation of physical evidence, as well as become familiar with forensic investigative techniques, and physical, chemical, and instrumental methods of analyzing evidence.  Hands-on activities involving reconstruction of a crime scene, fingerprint detection and recovery, microscopic, spectroscopic, and non-instrumental methods of analysis will acquaint students with some of the fundamental techniques used in the evaluation and characterization of physical evidence.  Using examples taken from adjudicated cases, the capabilities and limitations of the forensic sciences will be illustrated.  Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    BIO 125 - Environmental Science I


    This course is an introduction into environmental science for majors in Environmental Science. This course will provide students with the underlying science behind common environmental issues and give insight into the way that the science is applied in the environmental movement and the general public. The course will give an overview of issues such as climate change, energy use, pollution, habitat loss, and water relations. The laboratory will introduce students to field and laboratory exercises that are commonly used by environmental scientists to collect and analyze data. This course, in conjunction with Environmental Science II, may be used to fulfill the first of two science courses required for the core curriculum.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    BIO 128 - Principles of Nutrition


    An in-depth study of the science of nutrition. Topics to include: macronutrients, micronutrients, digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients, water and electrolytes, recommended dietary allowances, nutrition throughout the life cycle, and recent developments in the science of nutrition. Not applicable toward baccalaureate degrees in biology.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not for Major Credit Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    BIO 136 - Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology I


    This course is the first of a sequence of two courses that covers that basic anatomy and physiology of the human body.  In this course, basic cell biology, tissues and glands, as well as the integumentary, nervous, skeletal, muscular, and sensory systems will be covered in addition to an understanding of basic histology.  This course is specifically designed for Nursing students, but may be an appropriate prerequisite for other professions such as Occupational Therapy. 
    Lecture/Lab
    Credits: 4
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
  •  

    BIO 137 - Principles of Anatomy and Physiology II


    This course is the second of a sequence of two courses that covers that basic anatomy and physiology of the human body specifically for Nursing students.  In this course, the cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, digestive and reproductive systems will be covered. 
    Lecture/Lab
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: BIO 136  
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
  •  

    BIO 148 - Exercise Science


    This course will examine the basic science underlying exercise and its implications on overall health and fitness.  The influence of exercise and physical training on the human body will be studied in the context of a dynamic process.  After introducing the basic biochemistry and anatomy and physiology of the human body, a study of the effects of various exercise activities on the body will ensue.  The biology behind the structure and function of the bodily systems, the rationale behind many training regimens and the fallacy behind many myths will be explored. Two hours lecture two hour lab.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIO 154 - Medical Terminology


    This course will introduce the student to common medical terms used in health related areas. Prefixes, suffixes, and word roots will be stressed. The anatomy of the human body, disease process, and surgical and diagnostic procedures will be presented along with the medical terminology. This course is specifically designed to meet prerequisites for Physician Assistant graduate programs and other health related fields. This course does not fulfill laboratory science requirements for the college core.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    BIO 201 - Evolution, Ecology and Biodiversity


    An investigation of the interaction of evolutionary and ecological processes that have led to the great biological diversity observed in the world over geologic time. The course will begin with foundational concepts in genetics, particularly those responsible for creating genetic variation. The course will also discuss the geological and physical processes responsible for creating heterogeneous environments. Class discussions will then focus on the interactions of the biological systems with an ever-changing environment leading to an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for biodiversity. Concepts common to both evolutionary and ecological studies such as parasitism, predation, competition, sexual selection and speciation will be examined using current examples from both botany and zoology. A laboratory section of the course will reinforce the concepts discussed in lecture using metropolitan area as a classroom, along with computer simulations and experiments designed to illustrate current techniques used to study ecology and evolution. Three hours of lecture, two hours of lab.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisites: BIO 101  & BIO 102  and minimum of MTH 135 
  
  •  

    BIO 206 - Introduction to Botany


    A course that introduces students to the world of photosynthetic organisms. In particular, the course explores plant form and diversity. Emphasis will be placed on plant morphology, anatomy, reproduction, taxonomy, evolution, and ecology. Recent scientific developments will also be reviewed. The lab will have three objectives: 1) provide a macroscopic and microscopic survey of photosynthetic organisms from algae to flowering plants; 2) examine more closely the cells, tissues, and organs that make up a plant; 3) have students become more aware of plantlife that is around them. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite BIO 101 , BIO 102 
  
  •  

    BIO 211 - Genetics


    This course will cover the concepts of transmission and molecular genetics including patterns of inheritance, genetic variation, the cellular basis of heredity, the nature of the genetic material, replication, the molecular biology of gene function, gene expression and regulation, model organisms, and methods and tools in modern genetics. 
    Lecture
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisite: BIO 101 , BIO 102 , Pre or Co Requisite: CHM 110  
  
  •  

    BIO 225 - Environmental Science II: Environmental Geology


    This course is an introductory geology course that will be a study of earth systems in relation to human activities. Earth materials as well as earth processes such as plate tectonics, biological cycles, and ocean-atmospheric systems will be studied in relation to natural disasters, consumption of resources, agriculture, climate change, pollution, waste management and other environmentally related topics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: BIO 125  or BIO 201  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 230 - Pathophysiology


    This course will provide students with opportunities to learn fundamental concepts of disease mechanisms, the various responses of the body to restore homeostasis, and the effect of these responses on normal function. Topics covered include the physical signs and prognosis of common human disease. Pathogenesis will be viewed at the molecular, cellular, tissue and systematic levels and be correlated with signs and symptoms. Pathophysiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic and laboratory procedures, and the rationale or treatment modalities will be covered for model diseases.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BIO 101 , BIO 102 
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters
  
  •  

    BIO 238 - Human Anatomy and Physiology 1


    An in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics will include the structure of genes and their relation to proteins and the architecture of single cells and tissues. The organization of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems will also be covered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisites: BIO 101 , BIO 102  
  
  •  

    BIO 239 - Human Anatomy and Physiology 2


    An in-depth study of the physiology of the human body. Topics will include the endocrine, immune, cardiovascular, respiratory, degestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Emphasis will be given to exploring the human body in health and pathology through unifying concepts such as homeostasis and the reflex arc.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Perequisites: BIO 101 , BIO 102 , BIO 238  
  
  •  

    BIO 270 - Evolution


    An investigation of the history, processes and theories of biological evolution. Emphasis will be placed on evidence provided by paleontology, comparative morphology, molecular biology, developmental biology, ecology and biogeography. The overriding theme of the course will be to examine evolution as the unifying concept that integrates all of biology. The beginning of the course will focus on the important evolutionary mechanisms at the population level with particular emphasis on the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, natural selection and genetic drift. The course will then examine the process of speciation through analysis of species concepts and contemporary examples. The course will conclude with a discussion of the mechanisms of macroevolution and phylogenetic systematics. An accompanying laboratory will allow for a first hand opportunity to collect and analyze data used in the inference of evolutionary relationships. 2 hours lecture and 4 hours of laboratory per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisites: BIO 101  & BIO 102  or permission of department chair
 

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