2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Sep 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

Foreign Language

  
  •  

    ITA 250 - Italian Culture through Conversation


    This course will balance the concern for providing instruction in language skills with a strong view toward presenting Italy’s regions through a systematic and lively survey of the characteristics and customs unique to each region.  It will also provide a broad view of Italy’s development as a nation and its vital role in the contemporary world. Conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 104  or ITA 150  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ITA 251 - Intermediate Italian Culture through Conversation II


    This course focuses on the development of language skills at the intermediate level while it explores topics central to Italian history and culture.   Course is conducted in Italian.  Cultural research assignments may be conducted in English.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 250   or equivalent
    Core Course
    Offered Spring & Special Sessions
  
  •  

    ITA 260 - Italian Civilization


    This course taught in English provides an overview of Italian civilization, covering the major phases of Italian history from the early Greek and Etruscan colonies to the peninsula’s centrality to the Roman empire, from the medieval and early modern divisions of Italy to the Risorgimento and the creation of the Italian nation, from the drama of the wars in the early twentieth century to Italy today. Throughout this survey important political structures, social customs, commercial practices, and the evolution of the Italian language will be discussed, along with major figures in politics, science, and the arts. The course is conducted in English and may count to the Italian major.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Written Intensive. Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ITA 261 - Italian American Experience


    This course will explore the many connections between Italy and the Americas, from issues such as emigration and immigration, language and literature, translation, acculturation and cultural hybridization, and other cultural associations.  The course will analyze influence in both directions: Italy’s influence on America and America’s influence on Italy in terms of the arts, political ideology, and social practices from the early nineteenth century to the present.  The course is conducted in English.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall and Spring.
  
  •  

    ITA 265 - Dante’s Inferno


    In this course, students will be introduced to the first part of The Divine Comedy, the Inferno, as well as Dante’s early work, the Vita nuova. Dante’s minor works, such as Il Fiore, the Monarchia, and Il Convivio may be presented in order to illuminate various aspects of The Divine Comedy. This course is conducted in English and fulfills both writing intensive and the Diversity/Cross-Cultural/Global requirement of the core curriculum.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
    Written Intensive
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ITA 266 - Sinners and Saints: Dante’s Purgatorio and Paradiso


    After a brief overview of the first part of the Divine Comedy, the Inferno, this course will focus on the latter two canticles of the poem, the Purgatorio and the Paradiso. We will also consider Dante’s other works, such as the Vita nuova, the Monarchia, and Il Convivio, and the De Vulgari Eloquentia in order to illuminate some aspect of The Divine Comedy. This course is conducted in English.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall and Spring
    Offered in Special Sessions
    Written Intensive
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
  
  •  

    ITA 301 - Survey of Italian Literature 1


    Historical survey of Italian literature from its origins to the present day. Reading of selections from the works of the most representative authors, with special attention to the fourteenth century, the Renaissance, and the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Course conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 225 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    ITA 302 - Survey of Italian Literature 2


    Historical survey of Italian literature from its origins to the present day. Reading of selections from the works of the most representative authors, with special attention to the fourteenth century, the Renaissance, and the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Course conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 225 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ITA 305 - Advanced Italian Composition 1


    Course in advanced composition intended to develop the ability to write Italian with ease and correctness. Included are a review of grammer, consideration of stylistics, considerable writing of free essays, and translation into Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 203 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ITA 306 - Advanced Italian Composition 2


    Course in advanced composition intended to develop the ability to write Italian with ease and correctness. Included are a review of grammer, consideration of stylistics, considerable writing of free essays, and translation into Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 203 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ITA 307 - Advanced Italian Conversation 1


    Intensive practice in spoken Italian. There will be directed conversation, oral reports, and discussion in class on topics of general interest taken from current events and cultural material.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 225 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ITA 308 - Advanced Italian Conversation 2


    Intensive practice in spoken Italian. There will be directed conversation, oral reports, and discussion in class on topics of general interest taken from current events and cultural material.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 225 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ITA 309 - The Italian People and Their Culture 2


    An intensive on-the-scene study of Italy; a search into its past and present with visits to Rome, the Vatican, Castelgandolfo, Florence, Pisa and other locales rich in history, tradition and culture. This course is open to majors and advanced students. Conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    ITA 311 - Italian for the Business World


    A practical course in Italian structural forms and idioms used in today’s financial and business language. Extensive vocabulary building is designed to meet the needs of daily commercial and social encounters. Exercises in letter writing and reading and composition of reports. Course conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 305 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ITA 313 - The Italian Theater


    A survey of the Italian theater from the beginning to the present era. Attention to the position it holds in Italian literature and to its influence on world literature.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 305 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ITA 350 - Italian Immigrant Literature


    This course treats the growing body of immigrant Italian literature from late twentieth century and the early twenty-first century.  The writings of first and second generation immigrants from Asia, Africa,  the Middle East, and elsewhere are considered not only as signals of Italy’s growing multiculturalism but also as works of art that explore the issues of transnational identity.    Course is conducted in Italian. 
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Advanced level of Italian; any ITA 300 or ITA 400 level course or equivalent
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Literature Core Course.
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ITA 401 - Dante 1


    ‘The Divine Comedy’ will be stressed. Selections from the minor works, ‘Convivio’ and ‘Vita Nuova’ will be read and discussed. Lectures on ‘De Monarchia’ and ‘De Vulgari Eloquentia.’ Course conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 305 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ITA 402 - Dante 2


    ‘The Divine Comedy’ will be stressed. Selections from the minor works, ‘Convivio’ and ‘Vita Nuova’ will be read and discussed. Lectures on ‘De Monarchia’ and ‘De Vulgari Eloquentia.’ Course conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 305 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ITA 414 - Twentieth Century Italian Narrative


    A study of the major narrative works of the century. Readings will be chosen from the representative authors of verismo, decadentism, naturalism and neo-realism. Course conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 305 
    Offered Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ITA 415 - Twentieth Century Italian Theater and Poetry


    A study of the major theatrical and poetic works of the century. Readings will be chosen from the fin du siecle to the experimentalists. Course conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 305 
    Offered Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ITA 421 - Italian Civilization


    The development of the Italian nation from the Roman Empire to the present day; outline of political history and cultural achievements; study of Italian painting, sculpture, architecture, music and literature; current problems; impact on the Western World. Course conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 305 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ITA 422 - Italian Cinema


    A study of Italian Cinema from a variety of cultural, artistic and historical perspectives from its origins in the first years of the 20th century to the present. The course centers on several of the great masterpieces of Italian cinema that emerged after World War II, often viewed under the rubric of neorealism. Issues include: the relation of the Italian film tradition to that of other nations; the relation of film to literature and theater; the questions of dramatic unity and verisimilitude in the presentation of plot and character; the social message or hidden assumptions of the writers and directors; and technical innovations. Course conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ITA 450 - Seminar in Italian Literature


    A review of the great ideas and ideals learned in the liberal arts core curriculum in light of what has been taught in major courses, with a view to integrating for the students the two branches of their programs of studies. Readings, research and discussions of selected authors, works or genres of Italian literature.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Capstone Course Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ITA 453 - Special Topics in Italian


    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ITA 490 - Linked Internship in Italian


    A supervised work experience tied to an Iona College advanced course in Italian that requires regular use of the Italian language at an advanced level. The work may be in a variety of fields and may typically take place in a company, institute or other educational institution. The student will work five to six hours a week over a period of eight to ten weeks. As the internship is designed to supplement and extend the goals of the course with which it is linked, and the student is required to meet regularly with the professor of the course, write reports related to the experience, and submit a final project.
    Internship
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: major or minor in Italian in good academic standing and nine credits (3 courses) in advanced courses in Italian (300 or 400 level); by recommendation of the Department of Foreign Languages
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ITA 495 - Internship in Italian


    A supervised work experience tied to an Iona College advanced course in Italian that requires regular use of the Italian language at an advanced level. The work may be in a variety of fields and may typically take place in a company, institute or other educational institution. The student intern is required to meet regularly with an internship advisor from the full-time faculty in Italian, write reports related to the experience and submit a final project.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Major or minor in Italian in good academic standing and nine credits in advanced courses in Italian (300-400 level); by recommendation of the Department of Foreign Languages
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    JPN 103 - Elementary Japanese I


    Gradual development of the four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction to short excerpts from contemporary literary works and Japanese culture. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week. Credit only for students with no previous study of Japanese.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    JPN 104 - Elementary Japanese II


    Gradual development of the four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction to short excerpts from contemporary literary works and Japanese culture. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week. Credit only for students with no previous study of Japanese.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: JPN 103  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    JPN 203 - Intermediate Japanese I


    Designed to review the structure of the language, to strengthen the student’s aural/oral ability to communicate in basic everyday life situations in Japanese, and to introduce Katakana and Hiragana, two of the three main types of Japanese characters.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: JPN 104 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    JPN 204 - Intermediate Japanese II


    Designed to review the structure of the language, to strengthen the student’s aural/oral ability to communicate in basic everyday life situations in Japanese, and to introduce Katakana and Hiragana, two of the three main types of Japanese characters.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: JPN 104 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    LAT 103 - Elementary Latin 1


    The fundamentals of the Latin language. Emphasis on grammar, forms and speedy development of reading skills. Selected readings from Classical through Medieval and Renaissance literature. The Latin roots underlying English vocabulary. Credit only for students with no previous study of Latin.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    LAT 104 - Elementary Latin 2


    The fundamentals of the Latin language. Emphasis on grammar, forms and speedy development of reading skills. Selected readings from Classical through Medieval and Renaissance literature. The Latin roots underlying English vocabulary. Credit only for students with no previous study of Latin.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: LAT 103 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    LAT 203 - Intermediate Latin1


    Review of the fundamentals of the Latin language. Appreciative readings of Caesar, Cicero, Ovid, Vergil, the Psalter, the Latin Church Fathers. The role of Latin in the development of later Euorpean language and letters.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: LAT 104 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    LAT 204 - Intermediate Latin 2


    Review of the fundamentals of the Latin language. Appreciative readings of Caesar, Cicero, Ovid, Vergil, the Psalter, the latin Church Fathers. The role of Latin in the development of later European language and letters.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: LAT 104 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    LAT 301 - Latin Verse


    The course is a reading class focusing on Roman Poetry. Daily translations will accompany vocabulary and language reviews.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: LAT 203  or equivalent
  
  •  

    LAT 302 - Latin Prose


    The course is a reading class focusing on Roman prose authors. Daily translations will accompany vocabulary and grammar reviews.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: LAT 203  or equivalent
  
  •  

    LAT 303 - Medieval Latin


    The course is a reading class focusing on Medieval Latin. Daily translations will accompany vocabulary and grammar reviews.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: LAT 203  or equivalent
  
  •  

    SPA 103 - Elementary Spanish 1


    Gradual development of the four language skills; comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction of short excerpts from contemporary lliterary works. Introduction to Spanish culture. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week. Credit only for those with no previous study of Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 104 - Elementary Spanish 2


    Gradual development of the four language skills; comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction of short excerpts from contemporary literary works. Introduction to Spanish culture. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week. Credit only for those with no previous study of Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 103 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 107 - Spanish for Health Care Professions


    This course is a Spanish language course intended for students of Science or Health Care careers with no-knowledge or a limitid basic knowledge of Spanish. It aims to initiate the student in a Spanish Health Care work place.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 150 - Beginning Hispanic Culture through Conversation


    This is a comprehensive beginning Spanish course providing an overview of the civilization and culture of Spain, and the nations of Latin America. Although there is a promotion of all four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, emphasis is put on integrating the basic grammatical structures of the language into proficiency oriented activities focusing in on culturally relevant topics.  There will be a use of videos,  DVDs, power-point presentations and a field trip will augment lectures and discussions.  Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week (or as required by the instructor).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
  •  

    SPA 151 - Beginning Hispanic Culture through Conversation II


    Gradual development of the four language skills, aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, through a close study of the structure of the Spanish language and exploration of Spanish culture.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 150   or equivalent
    Core Course.
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
  •  

    SPA 203 - Intensive Intermediate Spanish


    Intensive review of the structure of the language intended to strengthen the student’s aural/oral comprehension and ability in written composition based on readings in modern literature. Three hours of class instruction and one hour laboratory per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 104  or equivalent.
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 204 - Introduction to Spain and Spanish America


    An overview of the civilization and culture of Spain and the nations of Latin America highlighting their development from their beginnings to the present. Use of slides, recording, flims, and a field trip will augment lecture and discussion.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 203  or equivalent
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 224 - Spanish Conversation 1


    Conversation based on everyday topics and on readings taken from a wide range of current events in newspapers and/or magazines. The primary aim of this course is to develop a speaking ability in Spanish. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequiste: SPA 104  or equivalent
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 225 - Spanish Conversation 2


    Further conversation based on everyday topics and/or readings taken from a wide range of current events in newspapers and/or magazines. The primary aim of this course is to increase the student’s ability through an active exchange of ideas on the part of students and instructor.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 224  or equivalent.
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 250 - Intermediate Hispanic Culture through Conversation


    This is a comprehensive intermediate Spanish course providing an overview of the civilization and culture of Spain, and the nations of Latin America. Although there is a promotion of all four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, emphasis is put on integrating the basic grammatical structures of the language into proficiency oriented activities focusing in on culturally relevant topics.  There will be a use of videos,  DVDs, power-point presentations and a field trip will augment lectures and discussions.  Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week (or as required by the instructor).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
  •  

    SPA 251 - Intermediate Hispanic Culture Through Conversation II


    This course focuses on the development of language skills at the advanced intermediate level while it explores topics central to Hispanic history and culture. Course is conducted in Spanish. Emphasis is put on integrating the basic grammatical structures of the language into proficiency-oriented activities focusing on culturally relevant topics.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 250  or the equivalent.
    Core Course
    Offered Spring & Special Sess
    ions
  
  •  

    SPA 255 - Conducting Business in Hispanic Cultures


    This course is a Spanish language course intended for students of Business with a prior basic knowledge of Spanish. It aims to initiate the student in a Spanish business speaking work place. (Requirements: SPA 150-level of Spanish or superior) (3 credits)
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    SPA 304 - Spanish for Hispanics


    A practical course in the structures of written and spoken Spanish for students with Spanish origin. The course is applied to those students who speak English but have a background in speaking Spanish at home.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    SPA 305 - Advanced Spanish Composition 1


    Course in advanced composition intended to develop the ability to write Spanish with facility and correctness; review of grammar, treatment of stylistics, considerable writing of free essays, translation into Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 203  or equivalent
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 306 - Advanced Spanish Composition 2


    Course in advanced composition intended to develop the ability to write Spanish with facility and correctness; review of grammar, treatment of stylistics, considerable writing of free essays, translation into Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 203  or equivalent
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 307 - Advanced Conversation 1


    An intensive course in Spanish conversation designed to provide the student with a practical vocabulary while developing fluency in the use of everyday Spanish. Oral reports and discussions of topics relating to general and cultural material. Three hours of class instruction per week. Prerequisite: Any 200 level SPA or equivalent.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 308 - Advanced Conversation 2


    An intensive course in Spanish conversation designed to provide the student with a practical vocabulary while developing fluency in the use of everyday Spanish. Oral reports and discussions of topics relating to general and cultural material. Prerequisite: any 200 SPA or equivalent.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 309 - Speech Patterns of Spanish


    A study of perfect patterns of intonation, pronunciation, and expressive features of contemporary spoken Spanish. Intensive practice of structural patterns of the spoken language. Conducted in Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 203  or equivalent
    Offered Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SPA 310 - Spanish Literature Origin through the 16th Century


    A study of the evolution of Spanish literature from its earliest manifestations to the Baroque period; extensive reading of important authors; lectures and discussions conducted in Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 305 , SPA 306 , SPA 307 , or SPA 308 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 311 - Spanish Literature 17th to 19th Century


    A study of the major trends in Spanish literature from neo-classicism through the twentieth century, including romanticism, realism, naturalism, and contemporary movements. Reading of major authors; lectures and discussions. Course conducted in Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 305 , SPA 306 , SPA 307 , SPA 308  or SPA 310 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 312 - Spanish American Literature from Pre-Columbian to the Present


    A study of the major trends in Spanish literature from pre-Columbian writings through the Discovery, Baroque and Independence periods to the present day. Extensive readings of prominent authors, lectures and discussions. course conducted in Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SPA 305 , SPA 306 , SPA 307  or permission of dept.
  
  •  

    SPA 320 - Written Spanish for the Business World


    Intensive practice in commercial Spanish correspondence for the business or international studies major. Develops proficiency in use of standard idiomatic written Spanish and practical business terminology.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    SPA 409 - Spanish Golden Age Literature


    This course is a study of major representative works from the period including narrative, poetry and drama, with particular emphasis on drama. It may include such canonical writers as Garcilaso de la Vega, Santa Teresa de Jesus, San Juan de la Cruz, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calderon de la Barca, Quevedo and Gongora, as well as the anonymous work Vida de Lazarillo de Tormes. The works of these masters will be analyzed from a historical, ideological, socio-political and literary perspective. Course conducted in Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    SPA 411 - Spanish/Latin American Cinema


    This course provides an introduction to the cinema of Spain and Spanish America. The course is designed to study, among many other topics: the relationships between language and film, text and image, as well as the representation of society, culture and history. Films from Mexico, Cuba, Argentina, Spain and other countries will initiate students into discussion and readings. Students will continue with directed research into areas of interest.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    SPA 412 - The History and Culture of Spain


    This course is a survey of the history and culture of Spain from the earliest times to present day society. Special attention is given to the area of the Spanish Empire and to the events of the modern and contemporary periods. Cultural achievements in art (including architecture, sculpture, paintings, music, dance, folklore, etc.) are explored along with Spain’s rich heritage of popular culture and customs. Course conducted in Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 413 - The Hispanic Heritage


    A study of the Hispanic influence on the development of Latin America. The outstanding Indian Civilizations of Mexico and Peru are surveyed; the development of the present day nations is traced through the periods of discovery, conquest, colonization and independence. Particular stress is given to the current problems of these nations. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Knowledge of Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 415 - Puerto Rican Heritage


    Aspects of the civilization and traditions of the Puerto Rican culture will be discussed to help students understand social situations more fully. This course is especially designed as a service to those students who will be involved in community programs. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Knowledge of Spanish
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 416 - Contemporary Spanish Literature


    An interpretation and analysis of the major authors of the contemporary period; their impact on the philosophical, social, and political climate of Spain will be considered. Course conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Knowledge of Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 420 - Miguel de Cervantes: El Quijote


    This course is a comprehensive and analytical study of Cervantes’ masterpiece El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha. It combines a close reading of the entire original work with some informative and critical materials in light of its historical, social and literary context. Special attention will be placed on the socio-cultural aspects, characters, literary trends of the time, and richness of its language and style. Course conducted in Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    SPA 426 - Contemporary Hispanic American Literature


    A interpretation and analysis of the major authors of the contemporary period; their impact on the philosophical, social, and political climate of Latin America will be considered. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Knowledge of Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SPA 429 - Cervantes Theater of the Golden Age


    This will be an analytical study of Cervantes’ work, giving special emphasis to his masterpiece, Don Quixote. This course deals with the Spanish theater of the Golden Age with emphasis placed on the ideological and literary currents. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Knowledge of Spanish.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 451 - Seminar in Spanish Literature


    A review of the great ideas and ideals learned in the liberal arts core curriculum in light of what has been taught in major courses, with a view to integrating for the students the two branches of their programs of studies. Readings, research and discussions of selected authors, works or genres of Spanish or Spanish-American literature.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Capstone Course Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    SPA 453 - Independent Study


    Directed research, discussion and readings in selected topics on the culture or literature of Spaniards or Spanish-Americans. Prerequisite: approval of department chair. 3 credits.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    SPA 455 - Special Topics


    This is an introductory course in translation intended for students of Spanish, as such this class will combine theory and practice to approach the basics of translation. The main focus centers on translating a wide range of different texts: literary/non-literary/technical, etc. The translations will be from English into Spanish and from Spanish into English and will provide a glimpse of techniques used in translation. The course will be taught mostly in Spanish, although there will be some lectures in English.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SPA 490 - Linked Internship in Spanish


    A supervised work experience tied to an Iona College advanced course in Spanish that requires regular use of the Spanish language at an advanced level. The work may be in a variety of fields and may typically take place in a company, institute or other educational institution. The student will work five to six hours a week over a period of eight to ten weeks. As the internship is designed to supplement and extend the goals of the course with which it is linked, and the student is required to meet regularly with the professor of the course, write reports related to the experience, and submit a final project.
    Internship
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: Major or Minor in Spanish in good academic standing and nine credits (3 courses) in advanced courses in Spanish (300 or 400 level); by recommendation of the Department of Foreign Languages
    Department Consent Required
  
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    SPA 495 - Internship in Spanish


    A supervised work experience tied to an Iona College advanced course in Spanish that requires regular use of the Spanish language at an advanced level. The work may be in a variety of fields and may typically take place in a company, institute or other educational institution. The student intern is required to meet regularly with an internship advisor from the full-time faculty in Spanish, write reports related to the experience and submit a final project.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Major or Minor in Spanish in good academic standing and nine credits (3 courses) in advanced courses in Spanish (300 or 400 level); by recommendation of the Department of Foreign Languages
    Department Consent Required

History

Courses may be classified as follows:

Core Curriculum:

Humanities Requirements History Core Course Choices: HST 101 HST 120 , HST 201 , HST 304 , HST 310 , HST 311 , HST 315 , HST 319 , HST 335 , HST 336 , HST 337 , HST 338 , HST 343 , HST 345 , HST 346 , HST 351 , HST 352, HST 355 , HST 360 , HST 368 , HST 370 , HST 372 , HST 374 , HST 381 , HST 382 , HST 385 , HST 386 , HST 391 , HST 392 , HST 393 , HST 396 , HST 410 , HST 411 , GEO 415 .

Diversity, Cross-Cultural, and Global Perspectives Core Course Choices: GEO 305 , GEO 415 , HST 319 , HST 337 , HST 338 , HST 345 , HST 355 , HST 360 , HST 368 , HST 370 , HST 372 , HST 374 , HST 381 , HST 382 , HST 385 , HST 386 , HST 391 , HST 392 , HST 393 , HST 396 .

Integrated Core Themes (ICT) Centerpiece Courses: HST 345  (Violence ICT), HST 304  (Innovation and Creative Mind ICT)

  1. American History: HST 207 , HST 208 , HST 304  , HST 310 , HST 311 , HST 315 , HST 319 , HST 335 , HST 336 , HST 337 , HST 338 .
  2. European History: HST 337  , HST 341, HST 343 , HST 345 , HST 346 , HST 348, HST 351 , HST 352, HST 355 , HST 360 , HST 368 , HST 370 , HST 372 , HST 374 .
  3. Non-Western History: HST 338  , HST 360  , HST 381 , HST 382 , HST 385 , HST 386 , HST 391 , HST 392 , HST 393 , HST 395, HST 396 .
  4. Colloquia, Seminars and Research: HST 301 , HST 410 , HST 411 , HST 491 , HST 492, HST 497 , HST 499 .
  5.  

  
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    CDS 1115 - Crisis in the Middle East: Historical and Political Perspectives


    This course will examine the historical and contemporary situation in the middle east region. Topics include the crisis in Lebanon, Arab-Israeli relations, and American and Soviet policies in the region. The impact this region has on international politics, including Soviet-American relations, will also be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
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    CDS 1159 - The Vietnam Experience


    This course traces the history of U.S. involvement in Vietnam from the early post-World War II period to the collapse of the Vietnamese government. Special emphasis is placed on the changing U.S. role in Vietnam during the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered in the Fall Semester Weekend Intensive
  
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    CDS 1166 - The Holocaust


    The holocaust will be examined through the literatures of history and other social and behavioral sciences, biographies, novels and film.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
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    GEO 305 - General World Geography


    An introduction to the regions of the world through study of the role of environmental factors and resources - topography, climates, soils, vegetation, minerals and their impact upon human environment population, chief cultural features and economic activities.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    GEO 360 - Historical Geography


    This course examines the role of landscape, natural resources, and environment in key historical events. Students will be introduced to classical and contemporary theories of the discipline and will examine case studies from both Western and non-Western centers of civilization.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    GEO 415 - Economics of Global Resources


    A geographic analysis of world resources: Agricultural, mineral, technological and human. A study of resource patterns, world interdependence in primary commodities, problems of ‘cartelization’ and their implications for industrialization and economic development and well-being of nations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    GEO 491 - Special Topics in Geography


    This course will entail the examination of a theme or region which currently listed geography courses do not explore or do not address in sufficient detail.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    HST 101 - Evolution of Western Civilization


    The topical progression of the course will be chronological, from the age of Ancient Greece up to the end of the Cold War/beginning of the Global Era. Along with an exploration of the development of the institutions, ideologies and cultures which have both composed and characterized the West, this course will also introduce the interaction between Western and non-Western societies that has established both the present position as well as current perceptions of the West in world affairs. Not open to students who have taken HST 105.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    HST 120 - Timeless Issues in History


    This course will illuminate seven enduring themes of history: (1) War and Peace, (2) Government, (3) Religion, (4) Culture, Ethnicity and Gender, (5) Transformative Ideas and Intellectual Trends, (6) Social Hierarchies and Structures and (7) Trade and Economy. Select eras and societies from global history will be used to exemplify to consider and to critique these themes.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
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    HST 201 - Tradition and Modernity: The Challenges of the Non-Western World


    The history of the non-Western world will be considered topically with focused consideration on areas of contemporary historical significance. The scope of the analysis-early civilization, interaction with European powers during exploration and colonization, and the problems and potentials since decolonization and independence-will provide a nuanced understanding of historical development in troubled spots of the non-Western world. Not open to students who have taken HST 106.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: HST 101  or 105
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    HST 207 - Growth of the American Republic


    A topical history of the United States emphasizing European colonization, colonial government and society, the Revolution, problems of the new nation, westward expansion, Jacksonian Democracy, slavery, sectionalism and secession, the Civil War and Reconstruction.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    HST 208 - Emergence of Modern America


    A topical history of America in the last century emphasizing the new industrialism, immigration, urbanization, the labor movement, populism and progressivism, two world wars, the New Deal, the United States as a world power, and the civil rights movements of the sixties.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    HST 301 - The Study of History


    An introduction to methodology and historiography. Methods of research and writing are practiced on the basis of readings in primary and secondary sources and in the works of great historians, past and present. The great historical writings will be treated in terms of their literary merits, and great historiographical controversies will be discussed. Selected problems in the theory and philosophy of history will be raised. Career opportunities for students majoring in history will be explored in light of the departmental curriculum. Must be taken no later than junior year for majors.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Oral Intensive. Offered in the Fall Semester. Written Intensive
  
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    HST 304 - From Hamilton to Mickey Mouse: IP and Politics of Innovation in American History


    This seminar course examines the dynamic between artistic and scientific innovation and democratic government in America from the eighteenth century to the present day. Exploring copyright and its intersection with patents, trade secrets, and trademarks, we will investigate and assess the development of political authority in tandem with that of changing ideas about the role of creative expression in American society. From books, visual art, music and their technologies in Early America through kindles, Instagram, and Spotify today, we will study the relationship between making art and making money.  To do so, we will focus on how the expansion of the federal government was influenced by and in turn supported transformations in intellectual property, via both law and practice. Framed by the wider context of political, legal, and economic history as well as the history of capitalism, technology, race, and gender, we will study innovation as a central idea and institution in complex and often contradictory understandings of national democracy through the lens of intellectual property.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Innovation. Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    HST 310 - American Colonial History


    A survey of colonial history emphasizing the political, economic and social foundations in European colonization, religious and intellectual development, Anglo-French rivalry and the colonial wars, colonial resistance to Britain, the American Revolution and its aftermath.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    HST 311 - The American West


    This course will consider the history of the American West from Spanish contact through to the present. The West is analyzed geographically (with ever-changing boundaries), politically, socially, culturally, racially, and economically. The primary focus of the analysis will combine primary source documents, lectures and discussion, and relevant historiographical materials.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
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    HST 315 - Civil War and Reconstruction


    A study of the causes and events leading to the war between the American states, political and economic developments in North and South, the military progress of the war and the role of President Lincoln. The course concludes with an analysis of the political, constitutional, economic, and social consequences of Reconstruction.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    HST 316 - The Age of Revolution and Historical Memory


    This course takes as digital humanities approach to the revolutions that occurred in the Americas and Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and situates them in the broader transformations of the Age of Revolutions.  It looks at how revolution was remembered by subsequent generations, both as a singular event and as a cluster of ideologies and protests.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    ICT Core Theme Centerpiece: Revolutions
    Offered in Fall & Spring.
  
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    HST 319 - America’s Recent Past


    A study of American history in the twentieth century with emphasis on the impact of the two world wars. The roles played by big government, the civil rights and protest movements, multinational corporations and modern unionism are examined.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    HST 334 - The World at War: The First and Second World Wars


    This course examines the major events of the First and Second World Wars as well as the reasons for their outcomes and the legacies of both conflicts.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status
  
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    HST 335 - Development of American Foreign Relations


    An examination of the diplomatic history of the United States to the Spanish-American War, including the origin and development of traditional policies, Manifest Destiny, Isolationism, and Expansionism.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    HST 336 - American Foreign Relations in the Modern Age


    An examination of the diplomatic history of the United States in the twentieth century, including American involvement with Europe and Asia, American policy towards Latin America and Africa, and contemporary problems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    HST 337 - The Immigrant Experience


    A comparative study of European countries, emphasizing conditions in Italy, and of the problems facing the twentieth century immigrant in the United States. The process of acculturation is examined. The course will consist of lectures supplemented by selected readings, taped interviews with immigrants, and motion pictures.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. ICT Core Theme Centerpiece: Identity. Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    HST 338 - The Vietnam Wars 1939-1998


    This course examines the various conflicts that have taken place in Vietnam since the outbreak of the Second World War. While close attention is paid to the American war in Vietnam, the wars involving the Japanese, French, Cambodians, and Chinese are studied as well.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
  
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    HST 343 - Medieval Europe


    This course is a study of the important persons, trends, and events that shaped the history of Europe from approximately 300 to 1500 AD. The class will explore the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, scholastic and technological developments of the Middle Ages and how some of these developments established a foundation for the establishment of modern societies and states.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered When Needed
  
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    HST 345 - The History of Violence


    Do we live in a society that is more, less or just as violent as previous ones? This course seeks to develop an answer to that question by exploring the history of attitudes toward the use of violence from Ancient Greece to the present age. Before undertaking an exploration of the enactment, control and representation of violence in various historical eras, we will first examine the insights which other fields of research [psychology, primate anthropology, cultural anthropology, biology, neuroscience, philosophy and literary criticism] offer for our understanding of why humans choose to favor or shun violent behavior. Then we will undertaken an exploration of historical periods [mainly from Western Civilization] with a particular focus on: changes in attitude toward the legitimacy of violence for resolving conflicts [especially interpersonal conflicts]; channels for violence and aggression; the influence of state formation/deformation, law, religion, honor, custom, and gender on the use of violence; the presence, or lack, of a ‘civilizing process’.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Violence. Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    HST 346 - Renaissance and Reformation Europe


    This course will cover the major political, intellectual, social and cultural developments in Western Europe from the beginning of the Italian Renaissance, approximately 350 AD, to the end of the Protestant Reformation in 1648.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status.
 

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