2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Jun 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

Religious Studies

  
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    RST 370 - Creative Peacemaking


    An exploration of critical issues of peace and justice through the faith and philosophies of several modern peacemakers, highlighting the causes of human violence and injustice and the conditions for social justice and peace.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  ENG 120  or Honors Status.
    Offered When Needed. Written Intensive. Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Innovation.
  
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    RST 375 - Wisdom Literature


    A study of the Wisdom books of the Old Testament in detail, their similarity to extra-biblical traditions, and their influence on the New Testament writings. Analysis will be primarily literary, though there will be some historical and comparative considerations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    RST 400 - Internship in Religious Studies


    Internships in Religious Studies with cooperating museum, NGO, church-related agency, or other related institution under the supervision of a designated faculty committee. Method and content in religious education, theological or biblical research, justice and peace advocacy, direct service, religious environmental education, and method and content in varieties of interreligious dialogue will be studied. Conferences with designated faculty members and research reports will supplement the student’s practical experiential learning.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
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    RST 401 - Images of Jesus throughout History


    A study of the mystery of Jesus as experienced and expressed by Christians throughout the tradition, including the biblical, patristic, medieval and contemporary periods.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 402 - Christian Sacramental Theology


    An analysis of the Christian sacramental worldview, the Church’s ritual activity, and the challenges that sacramental theology poses to, and receives from, the practice of Christianity.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 404 - Catholic Creation Theology


    This course traces the historical tradition of Catholic Christianity’s theology of creation, rooted in early biblical sources, particularly the Books of Genesis, Job and the Psalms; illuminated in new Testament texts, particularly Johannine and Pauline writings; explicated and refined by the Patristic teachers; metaphysically elaborated in the Scholastic masters; and flowering in a rich medieval Christian cosmology. It will also investigate the contraction and eclipse of this affirmative celebration of the mysteries of The Trinity and Incarnation in subsequent centuries, beginning with the Black Death; in response to the Protestant Reformation; the challenges of the Enlightenment; the emergence of a secular and scientific-technological global culture – all of which contributed to the disorientation and dislocation of Christian theology and practice. Finally, and in light of the crises of the natural world, the inquiry will engage the resurgence of renewed creation consciousness and ethic of care within the Catholic community, both “from below” in popular women’s and environmental spiritualities and movements, and “from above” in academic theological and magisterial developments.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    RST 406 - Biomedical Ethics and the Christian Tradition


    An investigation of the Christian ethical tradition and its resources for an analysis of the ever-increasing challenges posed by developments in biomedicine and in the life sciences.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120  or Honors Status
    Offered When Needed. Written Intensive. Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Scientific Reasoning
  
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    RST 409 - Jesus and Judaism


    This course examines the life of Jesus in its Jewish context in an effort to uncover more accurate trajectories of continuity and discontinuity between Judaism and Christianity. The period of 2nd temple Judaism will be explored. An examination of key texts in the development of Jewish-Catholic relations since 1965 porvides a contemporary perspective on the theological developments of the first century CE.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 410 - Religion and the Constitution


    An examination of the concept of religious freedom as protected and defined by the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States, considering the historical purpose and original intent of the First Amendment’s separation of church and state, the judicial construction of the religion clauses of the First Amendment, and contemporary controversies regarding religious freedom and practice in American society.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 411 - Prayer: Theology and Practice


    An exploration of the human quest to develop the spiritual life through a study of Christian religious sources and traditions in a variety of formats and experiments with some techniques for the cultivation of spirituality through meditation practice, art, writing, music, dance, attention to nature, and commitment to service.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 412 - Environmental Ethics and Religion


    Confronted by the mounting evidence of severe and unsustainable threats to the integrity and flourishing of planetary life, this course will examine principles of ethical behavior, drawn from a comprehensive survey of global cultural traditions which support authentic earth ethic in which human responsibility and care extends to the integral community of earth’s soils, waters, air and the multiple plant and animal species that inhabit them. This theoretic orientation will be complemented by consistent consideration of actual case studies that explore the tension between humans as members of the earth community and the appropriate limits of human intervention with it.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    RST 420 - Special Topics in Religious Studies


    These courses are designed to offer an opportunity to explore selected topics in religious studies that are either not covered in the religious studies curriculum or that will be covered in greater depth.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    RST 422 - Special Topics in Religious Studies


    These courses are designed to offer an opportunity to explore selected topics in religious studies which are either not covered in the religious studies curriculum or which will be covered in greater depth.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    RST 425 - Special Topics in Religious Studies


    An exploration of the sacred wisdom of the great masters of the spiritual life drawn from a variety of traditions, cultures and periods of history. Each semester the spiritual path of one such Great Teacher will be selected as subject for inquiry and experimentation (ex. Jesus, the Buddha, Julian of Norwich, Hildegard of Bingen, Thich Nhat Hanh, Therese of Lixieux, Thomas Merton, Rabbi Abraham Heschel, Mother Ann Lee and the American Shakers, Dorothy Day, Thomas Berry, Bernard of Clairvaux, Teresa of Avila, Bede Griffiths, John of the Cross, Rumi, and Martin Luther King).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    RST 448 - Oxford University Theology


    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    RST 450 - Senior Seminar


    Directed research, readings and discussions for all religious studies majors for the purpose of coordinating the various branches of religious studies and researching topics of special interest to majors.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120   or Honors Status.
    Capstone Course. Offered When Needed. Written Intensive.
    Department Consent Required
  
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    WST 330 - Women, Gender, and Religion


    This course is a study of the lives of women and gender identities from a variety of perspectives and in various religious traditions.  It explores a wide range of issues and concerns, which have particular relevance to the religious experiences of women and persons of various gender identities.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece. Offered When Needed

Security and Threat Assessment

  
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    STA 491 - Special Topics in Security Threat Assessment


    Courses involving lectures, readings, and classroom discussion of selected topics in security threat assessment. These courses may be used for independent study as needed. (Specific topic to be indicated when offered.)
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  and junior status
    Offered in Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer

Social Work

  
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    SOW 204 - Camp Viva Service Intensive Experience


    This course offers an experiential exploration of the impact of HIV/AIDS on families and individuals. The service-learning aspect of this course requires students to serve as camp counselors at a one-week residential camp offered in mid-late August. As volunteer counselors, students lead and participate in daily activities of a residential camp for Westchester residents infected or affected by HIV/AIDS. Academic components include preparatory readings, extensive pre-service training, on-site individual and group supervision, reflective journals, on-site lectures, a debriefing process, an integrative paper, and several classroom meetings during the fall semester. Open to all students by application and interview.
    Service Learning
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
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    SOW 2200 - Sustainability and Community: An Environmental Justice Perspective


    Sustainability is often depicted as intersecting circles representing its social, economic, physical (environmental), and spiritual/ethical components.  Following an overview, this course focuses on social sustainability in theory and practice.  Social sustainability includes the development of trust, reciprocity norms, equity, and other conditions that permit coordination and cooperation for mutual benefit.  With environmental justice as a lens, many aspects of sustainability and community will be considered.  Over thirty percent of the grade is earned through service-learning projects, which will include an immersive rural experience and a local urban experience.   The service-learning component will feature hands-on activities out of the classroom, work with community partners, and reflection, all with the goal of applying critical thinking to integrate course concepts.  This course is open to all students with no prerequisites.  It can be applied as elective credit to the Environmental Studies major/minor as well as the Diversity and Social Welfare minor.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    SOW 2210 - Introduction to Social Work


    Social work is a broad profession with common goals and purposes, practiced in a wide variety of settings. This course is designed to introduce the student to the many roles and responsibilities of the generalist social worker and explore the various settings in which social work practice takes place. The course emphasizes the impact on human diversity in addressing strengths, problems and services.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Open to all students. Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    SOW 2220 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Human Diversity


    This course is designed to teach students the principles underlying multicultural assessment and intervention drawing on knowledge, awareness and tolerance of differences among people. Through a process of self-examination and cross-cultural participant experiences, students will explore themselves and the society in which they live, develop an appreciation of the multifaceted meaning of diversity, and cultivate professional alternatives for combating discrimination, stereotyping, and oppression across age group, race, gender, class, religion, physical disability, and sexual orientation. Attention will be given to increasing students’ understanding and assessment of the impact of diversity on clients’ lives.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Open to all students
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    DCCG
  
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    SOW 2230 - Social Welfare and Society


    This course seeks to provide a basic foundation for understanding the place and function of social work in the context of the broader social welfare institution in the United States. It examines the meaning of social welfare in contemporary society. Social welfare is defined, and the history and current patterns of provision of services within social welfare systems are explored. Historical antecedents are compared to recent approaches to the same issues. The role of values is examined, particularly as these values impact upon policy. Social welfare policy and social change are examined from many different perspectives. One credit of this course is satisfied by independent work.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Open to all students Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    SOW 2240 - Emerging Issues in Aging


    This course has been designed as an introduction to the multidisciplinary study of older adults. It will focus on the strengths and resiliency factors, as well as social justice issues associates with barriers to access and utilization of health and human services based on culture, health literacy, health disparities, race, ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status of diverse elders. Open to all students.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    SOW 3120 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Life Course


    Human Behavior and the Social Environment utilizes the bio-psychosocial perspective, which stresses a multi-dimensional view of human development and behavior. The multi-dimensional view of person in the context of the environment takes into consideration the challenges, stressors, and life tasks that occur during the life course. The individual and his/her environments are examined in their relationship to each other. The course stresses the importance of culture, race, ethnicity, gender, spirituality, and socioeconomic environment. One credit of this course is satisfied through weekly group work in which students develop their cross-cultural projects.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisites: PSY 201  or PSY 202  ; SOC 101  or SOC 102  
    Open to all students. Oral Intensive. Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    SOW 3130 - Social Welfare Policy


    The purpose of this course is to help entry-level social workers understand policy formulation, implementation and analysis, and to use them as interventive strategies for social work practice. Policies of concern to the general practitioner are studied with particular attention given to the impact of such policies on the lives of women, people of various ethnic, cultural, racial and religious groups, individuals of varying sexual orientation, those who are economically disadvantaged, and those with physical or mental disabilities.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: SOW 2230  
    Open to all students Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    SOW 3200 - Research for Social Work Practice


    This course is designed to teach students basic research skills so they can develop an appreciation of the value of research in generalist social work practice. The scientific method (as well as its alternatives) is explored with specific relevance to social work and social welfare issues. As such, quantitative and qualitative research strategies are addressed. Ethical behavior and the protection of research participants are examined. Varying approaches to practice evaluation are emphasized by means of a final assignment that requires students to apply their knowledge of research in formulating a comprehensive evaluation research proposal. This course is only open to social work majors.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Written Intensive. Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    SOW 3220 - Social Work Processes I


    This is the first in a sequence of three courses designed to prepare students for generalist social work practice with diverse client systems of all sizes, including the individual, the family, the small group, the organization and the community. Students are exposed to the broad theoretical base for generalist social work, to various fields of practice, and they explore a range of social work roles within the generalist framework, which recognizes, supports, and builds upon the strengths and resiliency of client systems. The planned change process is also introduced as the systematic intervention approach utilized by generalist social work practitioners and the requisite skills for its implementation are covered. Only open to social work majors.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    SOW 3230 - Social Work Processes II


    This is the second of a three-course practice sequence and focuses the social work knowledge, values and skills required to implement of the planned change process with varied client systems such as individuals, families, groups and communities. A multi-contextual (dimensional) framework is used to examine a wide range of diversity factors (age, class, color, culture, diversity, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, race, sexual orientation, socioeconomic and marital status, etc.) that not only differentially influence behavior, but also contribute to increased understanding of the unique ways in which people and communities respond to life crises. Appropriate research-based knowledge is considered in relation to the content, process, and outcomes of practice. A 100-hour practicum allowing students to test out classroom learning in the context of a social agency accompanies this course. Only open to social work majors.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: SOW 3220  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    SOW 3240 - Social Work Processes III


    This is the third in a sequence of three practice courses designed to introduce students to generalist practice skills and techniques that enable them to manage the planned change process with client systems of all sizes (individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, etc.). This class focuses specifically on application of the Planned Change Process to macro-level systems. Macro-level approaches include work utilizing task groups and advocacy, as well as intervention on the organizational, community, societal, and global levels. Only open to social work majors.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: SOW 3230 , Corequisite: SOW 3610  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    SOW 3330 - Violence, Trauma and Resilience


    This course will look at the risk factors and vulnerabilities as well as the coping strategies and protective factors found in populations of people who have experienced violence and/or trauma. The history of psychological trauma and the stages of recovery will be examined. Various theories from psychology, sociology, criminology and social work will be explored in relation to the causes, responses and historical context of violence, trauma and abuse. Several methods of helping people who have experienced violence, trauma, and/or abuse will be presented. Special policy and governmental responses to the plights of victims will also be covered. Topics will include natural disasters, terrorism, child abuse, domestic violence, and elder abuse. Factors such as racism, classism, ethnocentrism and homophobia that contribute to violence, trauma and/or abuse will also be explored. Students coming into this course will be eligible to apply for a Certificate of Completion for the NYS Coursework/Training in the Identification and Reporting of Child Abuse and Maltreatment. Open to all students.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    SOW 3610 - Field Instruction in Social Work I


    This is the first in a sequence of two courses that provide supervised classroom instruction in conjunction with the year-long field practicum (200 hours/semester). The purpose of the field practicum is to integrate and apply the knowledge, skills, values, cognitive and affective processes, and ethical standards explored within the classroom to actual social work situations. Integration of field and and academic learning is facilitated through a broad range of activities, lectures, and experiential exercises designed to promote the development of competent generalist social work practitioners. Only open to social work majors.
    Practicum
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite:  SOW 3230  and Corequisite: SOW 3240  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    SOW 3620 - Field Instruction in Social Work II


    This is the second in a sequence of two courses that provide supervised classroom instruction in conjunction with the year-long field practicum (200 hours/semester). The course furthers students’ understanding of biopsychosocial assessment, and includes introduction to mental status exams and DSM-V diagnoses. In addition, it deepens and enhances student knowledge of generalist practice principles and theories, as well as effective communication skills with diverse clients. Emphasis is given to the examination of specific intervention approaches, as well as the evaluation and the termination phases in the planned change process. Only open to social work majors.
    Practicum
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: SOW 3610  and Corequisite: SOW 4910  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    SOW 4910 - Senior Seminar


    Senior Seminar serves as the social work capstone course with three purposes:

    1. To help students understand and explore ethical issues and dilemmas that confront social workers in practice with clients, colleagues, supervisors, agencies and communities. Models for ethical decision-making are presented and applied.
    2. To provide a locus for oversight and coordination of the Senior Capstone Conference, with the course instructor serving as mentor in the presentation preparation process.
    3. Students of this course complete a professional electronic social work portfolio. This is a hybrid course, half of which takes place in the classroom and the other half through individual mentoring appointments and online completion of the Social Work e-Portfolio.

    Only open to social work majors.
    Seminar
    Credits: 4
    Corequisite: SOW 3620 . Students have generally completed all other courses in the major.
    Oral Intensive. Offered in the Spring Semester

  
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    SOW 4950 - Selected Topics in Social Work


    Electives dealing with topics and issues of current interests to social workers as well as with emerging fields of practice may be developed in response to students’ needs and interests.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4

Sociology

  
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    CDS 1105 - Parenting


    An examination of the parental experience. Included for discussion will be historical and contemporary social trends; effective communication and discipline; and problem solving. The course will include both theoretical and practical approaches to issues of parenting.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
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    CDS 1109 - Careers: How, What, Why and When?


    An overview of how to develop one’s career. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s values, interests and skills. Resumes, cover letters, interviewing skills and other tools of the job search will be discussed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
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    CDS 1132 - Sports Sociology through Film


    Sports films provide an interesting area for students to examine the relationship between sports and American society. By analyzing sports films students will see parallels between problems in sports, and problems in the larger society. (Weekend intensive)
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered in the Fall Semester Weekend Intensive
  
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    CDS 1154 - Intercultural Awareness: Practical Applications


    This course is designed to make individuals more aware of intercultural differences and to provide strategies for adapting to living, working, and traveling abroad. The course will be conducted as an intercultural workshop in which concepts and issues will be explored through the use of simulations, role-playing, critical incidents and other experiential exercises.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
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    CDS 1158 - Aids and Society


    This course will analyze many of the psycho-social issues that surround the issue of AIDS. These will be discussed in the context of moral and religious values, myths and phobias, and public policy. The impact of AIDS on both individuals and society will be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered in the Fall Semester Weekend Intensive
  
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    CDS 1179 - Sociology of Jazz


    This course emphasizes listening as well as sociological skills. It is important to recognize the manner in which jazz musicians use sound to construct their symbols in order to explore the sociological aspects of jazz. This course offers examples from different eras in jazz history via audio and video tapes as well as the presentations of live musicians.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered in the Fall Semester Weekend Intensive
  
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    SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology


    An introduction to the principles and methods of sociology. Topics include society and culture, socialiazation, family, social stratification, race and ethnicity, deviance and social control.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    SOC 102 - Social Problems


    An examination of the social problems which confront present day American society, including the problems of urbanization, family instability, crime and delinquency, pollution of the environment, poverty and welfare, race and ethnic conflict, and the rapidity of social and industrial change.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    SOC 202 - Science, Society & Self


    This course explores the social histories, purposes, and sociological intersections of science, technology, society, and the social self. Science is a collective enterprise acting upon humanity on both societal and individual levels. Society, social groups and culture also shape how science is conceived, performed, and used in an increasingly technologically complex world. This course surveys foundational practices distinguishing scientific norms and ideals from other methods of knowledge acquisition and verification. Applied and practical dimensions of science and technology as evidenced in popular media are also explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    SOC 301 - Major Social Thinkers


    A study of classic and modern social theories. Classical theorists such as Marx, Durkheim, Simmel and Weber will be studied along with the modern theoretical approaches of functionalism, symbolic interactionism, conflict theory and ethnomethodology. These theories will be tested against modern principles of the logic of theory construction.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SOC 101  or SOC 102 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    SOC 302 - Socialization


    A study of the relationship between the individual and society as a lifelong process. The roles of group behavior and social organization in shaping personality; social factors and their impact on the development of the self; how individuals are socialized into playing various roles in society.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    SOC 304 - Sociology of Health, Illness, & Medicine


    The course explores human health, illness, and the healthcare and medical fields primarily representing a subfield called medical sociology. This course’s sociological and public health approach seeks to understand human illness and disease beyond the traditional biological and medical lenses. Rather, a sociological approach uncovers the important social, political, cultural, and economic forces that alter and mitigate human health outcomes, meanings, and experiences across different settings. An emphasis is placed on the social determinants of health and fundamental causes of disease, such as race, sex/gender, age, socio-economic class, and social integration/support, and how they influence an unequal distribution of health experiences and healthcare outcomes. Further investigation explores how doctors, nurses, and patients interact, construct, and manage illness; also, social epidemiology, the organizational and historical changes in health care systems, and particular social movements and public policy are also discussed. Finally, the course provides a more nuanced understanding of the intersections between local and global health.
    Lecture/Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters
    DCCG
  
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    SOC 306 - Sociology of Deviant Behavior


    A study of how society comes to define certain behavior as deviant; an analysis of those deviances which form social problems: drug and alcohol addiction, pornography and sexual deviance, acts of violence, and the relationship of deviant subcultures to social disorganization, social conflict and social change.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    SOC 314 - Cultural Anthropology


    An introduction to the principles and field work methods in cultural anthropology. A look at various traditional societies and American subcultures focusing on social organization, family and kinship, political and economic institutions, and myth and religion.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    SOC 321 - Urban Society


    Social factors contributing to the development of urban areas; major urban trends including suburbanization, and regional migration; urban problems; theories and methods of studying urban areas.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    SOC 322 - Race and Ethnic Relations


    Ethnic groups in American society, problems of prejudice and discrimination, myths and scientific research concerning group differences, contemporary issues and dilemmas of intergroup relations
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in the Fall Semester. Written Intensive
  
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    SOC 323 - Social Class in America


    A study of inequality in class, status and power, its consequences and the forces which tend to increase and decrease it; status seeking, social mobility and American socioeconomic class variations; influence of increasing demands of Third World countries for a larger share in the world’s resources and power.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    SOC 324 - Sex and Gender Roles in Modern Society


    Study of sex roles in the contemporary United States. Emphasis will be placed on changing patterns of socialization, cross-cultural comparisons and historical development, class, race and subcultural variations, the effects of urbanism and industrialization, the feminist movement and change toward redefinition of sex roles.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    SOC 325 - Sociology of the Family


    An examination of contemporary family systems. Topics include mate selection, child-rearing techniques, marriage and parenting, contemporary trends including divorce and the one-parent family, the dual-career family, and nonmarital cohabitation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    SOC 340 - Adapting to a Different Culture


    This course is designed to teach individuals the importance of cultural differences, so that they can adapt to living, working and studying abroad or to living and working in a multicultural environment in the United States.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    SOC 350 - Research Methods


    An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics and its application to sociological research; focusing on measures of central tendency, variance, association, characteristics of normal curves, hypothesis testing, and principles of survey sampling.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SOC 101 , SOC 102 , 317
  
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    SOC 370 - Sociology of Religion


    Religion is a social phenomeon and is in an interactive relationship with the other social units that constitute a society. The sociology of religion concerns itself with this phenomena and its relationship to the rest of society.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    SOC 371 - Sociology of Sports


    An analysis of the role of sports in society and how sports are a reflection of society. Areas examined include socialization, deviance, racism, sexism, economics, mass media and the future of American sports.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    SOC 372 - Sociology of Popular Culture


    This course will explore the wide ranging concept of popular culture and its significant place and role in people’s everyday lives. We will explore the intersections of popular culture with important sociological organizations such as the media, the culture industry, and religious institutions, in addition to the social topics such as race and ethnicity, social inequalities, and gender and sexuality. Specific readings and research will focus on today’s changing practices of cultural production and consumption in areas such as fashion and style, music and art, eating and food, tourism and globalism, and television, film and the internet.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    SOC 408 - Juvenile Delinquency


    A study of what constitutes delinquency, a survey of some of its causes, the effect of societal reaction, the problems of measurement, and prevention. An emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues and current research in such areas as gang behavior and methods of rehabilitation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    SOC 410 - Penalogy and the Sociology of Corrections


    An examination of the mechanisms by which societies deal with those whose behavior is criminal; a study of the development of corrections and how it is used in contemporary societies, focusing on various models of corrections and implications for the offender, the institution, and the social planner.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    SOC 411 - Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Deviance


    An examination of deviance and social control; the ways in which they are defined according to the value systems of specific cultural and social groups in traditional society and in modern Western society.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    SOC 413 - Mass Media and Society


    A study of the social consequences of living in the Mass Media Age of TV, radio, press, and cinema; focus on media’s impact on the family, religion, education and on political-economic institutions; problems of criminal violence, censorship, mass exploitation and manipulation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    SOC 417 - Research Methods in Sociology


    Study of the logic and methods of sociological research: practice in formulating problems; deriving hypotheses and creating research designs; an overview of data collection and treatment techniques, field observation and participation methods; principles of sampling, questionnaire construction, survey methods, documentary analysis and credibility of records.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SOC 101 , SOC 102 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SOC 430 - The Sociology of International Development


    This course begins with outlining the historical context within which the term “Third World” emerged. It then discusses the political economy of Third World countries taking the case of specific countries or communities. The theoretical debates on “Development” (which is at the forefront of defining nations and cultures as “Third World” societies) will also be discussed. In so doing, we will pay attention to the major global institutions, and agencies that devise, expound and implement the development discourse throughout Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The course then delves into discussing how the process of globalization and its various facets (economic, political and cultural) affect the socio-cultural makeup of Third World countries. Finally, the course will discuss outstanding ethical (moral) and methodological issues (dilemmas) that social scientists (sociologists and anthropologists in particular) face when it comes to studying non-western cultures and societies, in general. It ends by discussing how these issues inform the ‘hierarchy of knowledge’ in the social sciences.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SOC 449 - Sociology Practicum


    Opportunity for supervised field experience in the area of the student’s particular interest in such fields as criminology, ethnic studies, sociology of the family, urban society, etc.
    Field Studies
    Credits: 3
    Open to juniors only. Open to Seniors Only Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    SOC 450 - Senior Seminar


    A coordinating seminar for advanced students who wish to participate in research projects in sociology or the social sciences. Socially relevant projects will be selected from the personal interests of students registered. Each student will submit a research paper summarizing his findings and analyzing them from a social science perspective only.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SOC 350 , senior status and approval of department chair. Courses in statistics and research methods are strongly recommended as advance preparation.
    Capstone Course. Open to Seniors Only. Written Intensive. Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    SOC 490 - Special Topics in Sociology


    This course is designed to offer an opporunity to explore selected topics in sociology which are either not covered in the sociology curriculum or which will be covered in greater depth. Some of the topics which may be covered in the course are: “Religion and Society,” or “The Sociology of Political Economy.” This course may be repeated under a different topic for additional credit.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Chairperson Approval Required Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required

Speech Communication Studies

  
  •  

    CDS 1174 - Communication Disorders


    This course provides an overview of communication disorders, and explores the impact of such disorders on education, employment and interpersonal relationships. Through lecture, discussion and the use of media, students will become familiar with disorders such as hearing impairment, stuttering, aphasia, cleft palate, voice disorders, language delay and laryngectomy. The professions of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology will also be described; academic requirements, clinical practica and scope of practice will be outlines.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
  •  

    SCS 101 - Introduction to Oral Communication


    An overview of the major aspects of communication study including interpersonal communication, public speaking, small group and nonverbal interaction. This course offers practical skills towards effective communication using theoretical foundations. Students will learn techniques for improving their oral communications skills through a variety of assignments. Normally completed in freshman year.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Oral Intensive. Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    SCS 108 - Introduction to American Sign Language


    This course will provide an introduction to American Sign Language. Emphasis will be placed on building vocabulary, understanding of simple grammatical structures, fingerspelling, and visual-receptive sign language skills. Topics related to Deaf culture and the Deaf community will also be discussed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    SCS 109 - American Sign Language and Deaf Culture II


    This course will build on the foundation established in Introduction to American Sign Language and Deaf Culture. Students will increase their fingerspelling abilities and their knowledge and use of ASL vocabulary, grammatical structure, and pragmatic rules. Deaf Culture will continue to be explore and discussed. Prerequisite SCS 108  or permission of Department Chair.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: SCS 108  or equivalent
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    SCS 205 - Interpersonal Speech Communication


    An in-depth course in which the student experiences the significance of his or her own abilities in speech communication. Learning will focus on communication and self, dyadic communication, and communicating interpersonally with audiences. The dynamic for this form of speech communication is nourishment in interaction.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Oral Intensive.
    Offered in Alternate Years.
  
  •  

    SCS 206 - Normal Acquisition of Speech and Language


    The course will cover the perception, production emergence, development and interrelationships of the five components of speech and language: phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics and pragmatics. Theoretical issues of language acquisition will be introduced.  This course focuses on early (ages 0-3 years) language acquisition.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 101  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SCS 207 - Introduction to Communication Disorders


    This course is an introduction to the study of communication and its disorders throughout the lifespan.  It provides an overview of the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology, its history, the types of disorders encountered, their evaluation and treatment, and the ethical standards and credentialing requirements as set forth by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.  An integral component of this course is extracurricular observation of assessment and therapy sessions conducted by speech-language pathologists.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 101  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SCS 208 - Clinical Linguistics


    This course is designed to provide undergraduate students of speech language pathology and audiology with an introduction to the field of linguistics and its various subfields (semantics, syntax, morphology, phonology, sociolinguistics, bio-linguistics, neurolinguistics) along with their applications to the field of clinical linguistics, i.e., the sub-field of linguistics that studies the application of linguistic theory to the field of Speech and Language Pathology.  The course is tailored specifically to meet the needs of speech and language pathology majors and it satisfies guidelines relative to the interface between the disciplines of linguistics and speech language pathology.  The course provides theoretical background to understand how the brain processes language in standard and non-standard contexts and determines the expected outcomes when a component of grammar is impaired.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    SCS 209 - Business and Professional Speaking


    Techniques of oral communication in business and the professions. The psychological concepts and the physical techniques underlying effective performance in interviewing, conference work and public presentations will be studied.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Oral Intensive.
    Offered in Alternate Years.
  
  •  

    SCS 220 - Intercultural Communication


    The focus of this course will be a study of the special problems of communication that emerge when people from different cultures attempt to communicate. The problems of different assumptions as starting points for discourse, language as basis of sensitivity and perception, nonverbal messages, and cultural norms and values will be considered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives.
    Oral Intensive.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 221 - Gender Differences in Human Communication


    This course explores differences in the strategies employed by females and males in intrapersonal, interpersonal and group communication.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Oral Intensive. Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 225 - Public Speaking


    A study of theories of public speaking and practice in the development of effective oral communication. Fundamental theories of rhetorical criticism will be studied and applied to chosen speakers and speeches.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: SCS 101  or equivalent
    Oral Intensive
  
  •  

    SCS 230 - Communication for Healthcare Professionals


    This course will provide a basic overview of the theories and practicalities of communication in healthcare. It will examine the relational components necessary in healthcare provider/patient relationships. Additionally, students will learn communication competence and effective communication in terms of the healthcare situation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 101  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SCS 231 - Narrative and Storytelling in Healthcare


    Focusing on patient-centeredness, this course seeks to utilize storytelling and narrative as a means of intake and interviewing in healthcare. The course will examine the therapeutic aspects of storytelling and its effects on the mind-body connection. Additionally, it will analyze mutual self-disclosure, illness narratives, and the humanistic approach to healthcare. Class discussions will explore how building rapport and trust in a healthcare situation can increase the likelihood of releasing the kernel story of the patient/client. Understanding of the student’s own health and illness stories will also be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 101  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    SCS 302 - Vocal Skills for Communication


    A study of voice and articulation patterns for social and professional use. The course focuses on the enhancement of these patterns, as needed, and on their use for the expression of personality.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SCS 101 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 319 - Bilingualism and Speech-Language Disorders


    This course offers an overview of bilingualism and bilingual language acquisition from a linguistic, sociolinguistic, and speech language pathology perspective. The course explores various aspects of bilingual behaviors, such as code switching and language mixing, in terms of their social functions within the bilingual community as well as in terms of neuro-linguistic organization in the individual speaker. The course will prepare speech-language pathology clinicians to work with bilingual children with language impairments, and it will help them acquire the tools to perform accurate language assessments on bilingual children avoiding all possible misdiagnosis.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SCS 206  and SCS 207  
  
  •  

    SCS 320 - Argumentation and Debate


    A course that includes basic elements of argumentation; techniques of debate. A variety of debating opportunities will be required in order to discuss and practice the rules that govern debate.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 101  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 323 - Persuasion


    A study of the art of influencing belief. The course will focus on the bases of belief and the strategies and techniques for reinforcing and altering beliefs. Studies will include the variations in strategies that occur when the forum alters from public address to mass propaganda.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 101  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 330 - Communication, Technology, and Society


    Explores how persuasive communication has affected our perception and employment of technology in society and how those technologies have, in turn, affected public discourse and interaction. Examines modern technological mythologies and their origins.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SCS 101 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 332 - Problems in Media Communication


    A study of those areas of media communication which have come to bear on our lives and the future of mankind. Specific units of study in freedom of speech and censorship; interpretative reporting; political, commercial and social propaganda.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SCS 101  or equivalent
    Oral Intensive. Offered in Alternate Years.
  
  •  

    SCS 360 - Human Communication Theories


    A study of the psychological principles involved in speech as a form of human behavior and application of these principles to individual and group problems in speech. Areas to be considered will include communication theories and models, language development, perception, attitude change and nonverbal communication.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SCS 101  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 363 - Phonetics


    A foundation course in articulary phonetics. A detailed study of the sounds of American English. Broad and narrow phonetic transcription are taught using the International Phonetic Alphabet.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 101  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SCS 364 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism


    A study of the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal and respiratory systems, the larynx, the skull and the nervous system as related to normal and abnormal speech production.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 101  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SCS 366 - Audiology


    A review of the principles of normal aspects of sound and hearing, and an introduction to the disorders of hearing and evaluation of the auditory system. Additional time will be required for students to practice equipment technique.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 389  
    Oral Intensive.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 367 - Aural Rehabilitation


    A study of the communicative problems related to hearing impairment, as well as the theoretical and practical aspects of management of the hearing impaired child and adult. Emphasis on the nature and use of hearing aids, principles of speech reading, problems of speech intelligibility of the deaf, and considerations of educational placement for the hearing impaired child.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite:  SCS 366  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 369 - Speech Pathology II


    Continued study of normal and disordered speech, voice and fluency in children and adults, and of the etiology, symptomotology and treatment of dysphonias, dysrythmias, dysarthrias and dyspraxias.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SCS 368 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    SCS 370 - Small Group Communication


    Experiential learning involving the theory and practice of group interaction. The student will be exposed to the dynamics of building relationships with members of a group and exploring directions of mutual group interest. The student will learn group processing and methods of evaluating group progress.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 372 - Introductory Field Experience in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology


    Twenty-five hours of observation in approved speech and hearing clinics, hospitals, schools and/or private practices. Students will be expected to keep a log of activities, submit reports of observations and cooperate with the speech-language pathologists and/or audiologists that they observe. Planned seminars will be used to discuss observations, explore opportunities in communication disorders, and to aid students in defining career goals. This course also fulfills the requirements set forth by the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association for observation prior to clinical practicum.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SCS 368 
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    SCS 375 - Interviewing


    The theory and practice of effective interviewing for both interviewer and interviewee will be discussed: creating rapport, barriers to interviewing effectiveness, styles of listening, categories of interview questions, effective verbal and nonverbal interviewing behaviors, and directive versus nondirective approaches. Students will participate in different types of evaluated interview settings, such as information-gathering, employment, persuasive, problem-solving and counseling interviews.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    SCS 380 - Communication Problems in the Aging


    This course examines the conditions which influence the speaking and listening habits of the aging, identifies the physiological, emotional and environmental factors which contribute to the deterioration of communication abilities, and delineates methods of helping the elderly to improve their patterns of communication.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 101 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    SCS 389 - Speech and Hearing Science


    Speech and Hearing Science refers to the study of production, transmission and perception of speech and hearing. In this course, you will be introduced to theories and concepts that illustrate the relationship bewtween acoustics, speech production and speech perception, the acoustic properties of voice, resonance of the vocal tract, the acoustic characteristics of vowels and consonants, and the acoustic cues of speech perception. The student will become familiar with acoustic instrumentation, diagnostic equipment used to measure speech objectively, and how this can be applied to evaluation and treatment of clinical disorders. You will study the anatomy and physiology of the ear, responses of normal and pathologic ears to change in sound stimuli, with particular concern for the application of this knowledge to the understanding of diagnostic tests of audiology and methods of rehabilitation of the hearing impaired.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SCS 101  
    Lecture
  
  •  

    SCS 400 - Independent Study in Communication


    Independent research designed to enable the student to examine, in depth, a specific area of speech communication or communication sciences. Work to be done under the supervision of an assigned advisor. Students may take a second independent research course for credit by enrolling in SCS 402.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: SCS 101  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
 

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