2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Jun 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

Computer Science

  
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    CS 434 - Game Development


    The course is a hands-on introduction to game design and development. It provides a comprehensive look at the overall game development process - from concept creation and initial design to implementation, testing, and marketing of the finished product. Students gain hands on experience developing and integrating game components and scripts using a professional game engine, and graphics, audio, and video modeling tools. Proper software engineering techniques are emphasized throughout the course.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 202 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CS 436 - Advanced Game Development


    The course explores advanced topics in game development, including advanced computer graphics, artificial intelligence, networking protocols for multiplayer gaming, hardware and software user interfaces, and databases and software engineering principles for game design and implementation. Students will work in teams on creating sophisticated multiplayer client-server game software using advanced software tools and techniques.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 301  
    Co-requisite: CS 434  
    Offered in the Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
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    CS 444 - Web Applications Development


    This course provides an in-depth introduction to the design, implementation, testing, and deployment of web applications. The course covers both client-side and server-side software development using a variety of markup, scripting, and programming languages and techniques. Interfacing to a database, deployment on an Apache server, and multi-browser support are also discussed. Special emphasis is placed on user-interface design and software efficiency. A number of projects will be assigned throughout the semester to reinforce the material covered during lectures.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 301 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CS 446 - Computer Graphics


    This course introduces fundamental concepts in 2D and 3D computer graphics, including graphics primitives, geometric transformations, 2D and 3D viewing and rendering. Basics in linear algebra are covered for understanding of image representation and manipulation. In addition to regular homework assignments, students are exposed to the literature in computer graphics, and implement a computer game using existing techniques published in the recent literature for the final projects assignment. In this course, students gain sufficient breadth in recent development in Computer Graphics to prepare them for studies in related fields, such as 3D game development.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CS 301  and MTH 250  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CS 451 - Operating Systems


    This course presents the fundamental concepts in the design and implementation of modern operating systems. The structure of a typical operating system is considered and the efficient design of its various components is studied. The impact of hardware and compiler technology on operating system design is examined throughout the course. Assignments include the design and implementation of a small simulated operating system.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CS 231  , CS 301 , & CS 311  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CS 452 - Advanced Operating Systems


    This course examines the internal structure and implementation of one or more real operating systems. Algorithms and data structures involved in scheduling, memory management, input/output and secondary storage management are discussed, and their interdependence and interaction are emphasized. The implementation of system calls for use in system programming and administration is also considered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 451  
    Offered in the Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
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    CS 461 - Artificial Intelligence


    This course covers the principal ideas and developments in artificial intelligence. Topics include knowledge representation, problem solving and search strategies, game playing, solving constraint satisfaction problems, uncertainty and probabilistic reasoning, and machine learning.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  CS 301  
    Offered in the Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
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    CS 464 - Parallel and Scientific Computing


    Distributed and Parallel Processing has established itself as one of the most important and fast-growing areas of Computer Science and Engineering.  The need for Parallel Computing permeates all areas of modern scientific investigation – from DNA and protein analysis, to weather prediction, to astronomy and astrophysics research, etc.  Almost all modern application software implements some forms of parallelism such as multithreading or SPMD computation.  Modern hardware is designed to take advantage of the great performance enhancement inherent in parallel processing, and to accomodate the parallel execution of software.  This course is intended as an introduction to the vast field of Parallel and Distributed Computing.  We will discuss the advantages and limitations of parallel computing, examine applications that greatly benefit from the availability of parallel processing hardware and environments, and discuss some modern trends in parallel hardware and software development.  Along the way, we will learn to write shared-memory multithreaded applications and SPMD programs for distributed memory parallel computer systems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites:  CS 231  , CS 301  and CS 311  

     
    Offered When Needed

  
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    CS 465 - Data Mining


    This course introduces principles of data mining methods for extracting knowledge from data. Topics include introduction to the knowledge discovery process, data preprocessing, visualization, machine learning and statistical methods for classification, regression, association mining and cluster analysis. Students gain hands-on experience in developing data mining solution to scientific and business problems. Social and ethical implications of data mining applications are considered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CS 301 
    Offered When Needed
  
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    CS 472 - Web Application Security


    The course introduces vulnerabilities of Web applications. The focus of the course is to learn the latest methodologies needed to break into Web applications. This course also teaches students how to discover, exploit and prevent security flaws in today’s Web applications on both the client and server side and to develop and maintain secure Web applications.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 315  , CS 444  
    Offered in the Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
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    CS 473 - Mobile Applications Development


    This course provides an in-depth introduction to the design, implementation, testing and deployment of mobile applications on a variety of modern mobile platforms. The course enhances the students’ object-oriented design and programming skills and introduces them to modern mobile development programming and scripting languages. Students become proficient in the use of the various tools for designing, testing, and optimizing the developed mobile software.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 301  
    Offered in the Fall Semester Alternate Years
  
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    CS 474 - Mobile Application Security


    This course shows students the security problems that developers and IT managers need to look for when developing and deploying mobile applications and the solutions to those problems on some of the most popular mobile platforms. This course prepares students for real-life problems and situations through an in-depth analysis of security issues and possible attacks related to mobile devices. The course shows students how to develop mobile applications more securely and how to keep mobile devices secure.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 315  , CS 473  
    Offered in the Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
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    CS 475 - Computer Networks and Network Programming


    This course presents computer networking in both theory and practice. Students learn about computer networks with a focus on networking protocols and network programming. Also covered is an overview of current wireless networks and network security (including an overview of current research in that area). This course contains a large hands-on portion allowing students the opportunity to investigate, design, and implement networking protocols.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CS 231  , CS 301  , CS 311  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CS 477 - Network Security


    This course introduces various attacks and threats that can take place in a computer network. The course discusses secure networking protocols, various wireless security protocols, and an introduction to operational security concepts. This is a hands-on course with multiple lab projects allowing students to investigate state-of-the-art network security principles. This course gives students an opportunity to learn about the various tools commonly adopted by ethical hackers.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CS 315 , CS 475  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CS 481 - Software Project Development: Design


    This course is the first part of the 2-course series on software project development. The focus of the course is on the design of the system. It involves a study of software development cycles and techniques necessary in the creation of large software systems. The following techniques are emphasized: user requirements elicitation, object-oriented class analysis and design, testing strategies and structures system evaluation, and project management. As an essential part of this course, students work in teams in the organization, management and development of a large software project. Department Consent Required
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair
    Offered in the Fall Semester.
    Oral Intensive.
    Written Intensive.
  
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    CS 482 - Software Project Development: Implementation


    This course is the second part of the 2-course series on software project development. The focus of the course is on the implementation of the system designed in CS 481  . Students are encouraged to explore efficient algorithms and robust programming techniques in order to meet the user requirements of the system in the allotted time frame. Completion of the 2-course series provides students with a solid understanding of large-scale software design and development in a team environment.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 481  
    Capstone Course Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CS 490 - Independent Study


    By special permission, students with an average of ‘B’ or better in computer science courses, and a demonstrated ability and need, may undertake independent work in a subject area not covered by any of the listed courses. Their work is under the supervision of a member of the department. Department Consent Required
    Independent Study
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair
    Offered When Needed
  
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    CS 491 - Special Topics in Computer Science


    Students study topics of current interest in computer science. Specific topics and additional prerequisites are announced in advance.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1, 2, 3
    Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair
    Offered When Needed
  
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    CS 498 - Computer Science Internship


    The course provides students with an opportunity to work in the private or public sector, in an area directly related to computer science. Students write reports about their work, meet with a designated faculty member, and give a formal presentation of their internship experience. Department Consent Required.
    Internship
    Credits: 1, 2, 3
    Prerequisite: CS 301  and GPA of 3.0 or higher and Permission of Department Chair
    Offered in the Spring Semester

Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJ 205 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    A description and analysis of the criminal justice system which will include a review of the organization, operation, procedures, goals and objectives of the police, the courts, and the corrections system.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CRJ 210 - Professional Standards & Ethical Considerations in Criminal Justice


    This course provides a historical and contemporary exploration in the field of criminal justice ethics. Students will learn and express an understanding of the different philosophical systems/schools of though (including classicism, utilitarianism, and peacemaking) and relate these ethical systems to ethical scenarios and decision-making opportunities in the different areas of criminal justice. Four specific areas examined are: law enforcement ethics, legal professional ethics, correctional ethics, and policymaking ethics. The course covers not only theoretical, but applied ethics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CRJ 305 - Substantive Criminal Law


    A comprehensive analysis of the substantive criminal law. The historical development of laws and rules prohibiting specific conduct under pain of punishment will be studied, tracing the earliest stages of common law up to and including the codification of current criminal laws. Elements of various crimes, defenses for unlawful conduct, criminal responsibility, and statutory and common law crimes will be examined in depth.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CRJ 310 - Criminal Investigation


    A comprehensive analysis of the various investigative techniques employed in the course of modern criminal investigation. Topics include the theory and methodology of criminal investigation, as well as the legal ramifications of particular techniques, such as eavesdropping and surveillance.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CRJ 317 - Evidence and Procedure Law


    An in-depth analysis of the rules of criminal evidence and procedure. The process of the American criminal justice system will be examined and special emphasis will be placed on constitutional limitations in the areas of criminal evidence and the law of search and seizure.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CRJ 320 - Corrections


    This course provides a traditional overview of the corrections system including the historical development of the social control of human behavior in our society. Students will come to understand how correctional institutions implement the incarceration of offenders – how it functions for society and shapes our culture. An analysis on major issues confronting corrections including sentencing strategies, prisoner management, prison gangs, the inmate subculture and violence, prisoner re-entry and the reintegration of special-type offenders back into society will be examined.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 325 - Critical Issues in Policing


    This course entails a comprehensive analysis of critical issues affecting policing in society and the interaction of the police within the context of addressing major trends in crime control and law enforcement in modern American society. The historical development of police agencies and policing strategies will be studied, tracing the earliest stages of the policing theory and the changing role of the police in society and the society of the police. Special topics include emerging and evolving police practices regarding women and children as victims and offenders, as well as topics involving special police investigative actions and techniques (such as pattern homicide and sex offender cases) will be examined in depth.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 330 - Criminal Justice Criminology


    An introduction to the phenomenon of crime and the mechanisms which society has devised to handle those who are charged with crimes. Analysis of interdisciplinary issues within the field of criminology and the various existing theoretical perspectives. The course will provide a general survey of the nature and causes of crime and the efforts of the criminal justice system to predict, prevent, modify, and correct this behavior. The extent of criminal behavior is reviewed as well as its implications and effects on the criminal justice system.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 333 - Ethics in Criminal Justice


    This course provides a historical and contemporary exploration in the field of criminal justice ethics. Students will learn and express an understanding of the different philosophical systems/schools of thought (including classicism, utilitarianism, and peacemaking) and relate these ethical systems to ethical scenarios and decision-making opportunities in the different areas of criminal justice. Four specific areas examined are: law enforcement ethics, legal professional ethics, correctional ethics, and policymaking ethics. The course covers not only theoretical, but applied ethics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Spring Semester
  
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    CRJ 335 - Forensics & The Criminal Justice System


    This course will trace the evolution of the criminal justice system in the US with particular attention to the role of the scientific expert witness and impact of forensic science in the courts. While a number of characteristics have been used in the past to identify criminals, the advent of characterizing an individual’s DNA and new criminal investigation techniques have dramatically changed the role of the forensic scientist. This course will trace the evolution of theses testing methods and the work that was necessary for them to be accepted as scientifically reliable.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  
    Offered in Spring & Special Sessions
  
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    CRJ 338 - The Juvenile Justice System


    This course will cover the history and philosophy of juvenile justice in America and the impact of present societal reforms on the juvenile system. A wide array of theoretical positions will be discussed and debated (e.g.- social structure theories, social process theories, social reaction theories, etc.). The influence of the family, media, peers, socioeconomic status, drugs, gang affiliation, and schools will be covered in detail. An overview of the legal framework in which the juvenile justice system operates will highlight the differences in adult and juvenile law. Students will be expected to know the landmark juvenile court cases and the current trends impacting the juvenile court. The systemic role of the police, the juvenile court, and juvenile institutions will be explored. Child abuse and neglect, status offenders, and the unique needs of young people will also be examined. Students will obtain a working knowledge of the juvenile system and an understanding of associated occupations. The study of the youth-gang subculture will be an integral portion of this course.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CRJ 340 - Probation and Parole


    The objectives of this course will focus on the theoretical and practical perceptions of the community correctional field. This system operates within the borders of the criminal justice system and is symbiotic with all other facets of this system. “Community corrections” allow individuals who have been convicted of a crime to serve all or part of their sentence in society under a supervised living condition. This brand of justice, although a cost effective modality, often comes under harsh criticism of the political establishment, other criminal justice agencies, as well as other societal “voices.” Community corrections has its roots in a “socialized justice” model that originally allowed “young, nonviolent, first time offenders” an opportunity to assimilate back into the community and become productive members of society. Personnel in this field put into practice a philosophy known as the “TRINITY” that establishes three (3) primary goals: A) protection of the community; B) rehabilitation of the offender and; C) enforcement of Court orders. Agents must take into account the specific needs of each offender without sacrificing the safety of the community as a whole. Ultimately, the balance between these goals and means define the role of a community correctional officer.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  
  
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    CRJ 342 - Species Justice


    This course will consider the global issues impacting animals & species justice, including: definitions, causes, and extent, with a focus on solutions. It will examine theoretical orientations that explain the psychological, social, political, cultural, and economic forces that drive our relationships with non-human animals as well as the legislation and legal frameworks that criminalize practices that harm animals and their enforcement or do not.Discussions of issues impacting non-human animal issues will include agribusiness, poaching, experimentation, hunting and trapping, companion animal concerns, and more. The course explores different philosophies regarding the treatment of sentient beings, exploring rights, responsibility, care and liberation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Spring Semester
  
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    CRJ 345 - White Collar Crime


    This course will provide the student with an awareness of illegal activities committed by nonphysical means, usually through deceit. Special emphasis will be placed on such areas as offenses against property, commonly referred to as “white collar crime,” organized crime, credit card fraud, computer crime, insurance and medical fraud, and specific law enforcement efforts directed against these crimes.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CRJ 347 - Environmental Crime


    This course considers the global problem of environmental crime, including definitions, causes, and extent, with a focus on solutions. The course will examine theoretical orientations that explain the psychological, social, political, cultural, and economic forces that drive environmental crime as well as the legislation and legal frameworks that criminalize practices that harm the environment and their enforcement–or don’t.  Case studies will be used to critically analyze problems and enforcement methods and you will take direct action through a project centered on a topic of your choice. The course will focus on a solutions-oriented approach, balancing the study of environmental crime and its challenges with action toward creating sustainable and restorative systems that benefit people, animals, and the earth itself.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Spring Semester
  
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    CRJ 350 - Organized Crime


    The objective of this course is to introduce students to the theories, hypothesis, and perceptions of the concept of “Organized Crime.” The media, including both and print and cinema characterized and often glorifies organized criminal figures based on fixed agendas that are a misrepresentation of the true nature of organized crime behavior. The class will study the “forefathers” of organized crime, including Carnegie, Rockefeller and Kennedy and advancing along the time frames of history, students will become familiar with how individual criminals and criminal “enterprises” have emerged over the years to form what we now know as “organized crime.” The 21st century has also seen the emergence of violent street gangs that are predicted to significantly impact the crime rate in America. In addition, the course will examine how law enforcement agencies (local, state and federal) recognize and distinguish different organized criminal activity and what proactive steps are being taken to fight this form of criminal behavior. The course will also address how our judicial system, specifically, through legislation and criminal statutes, has impacted these illegal criminal enterprises.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 
  
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    CRJ 360 - Terrorism


    This course will examine the nature and background of terrorism. The historical origins of terrorism throughout the world, from the early days of eastern and western civilization, through the modern era will be presented, primarily through lectures, case studies and assigned readings. Current terrorist groups will be examined and their roots, philosophies and techniques will be explored. Additionally, the governmental response to terrorism, including legislation and both the police and military response to terrorists and terrorist acts will be examined.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 392 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    Courses involving lectures, readings and classroom discussion of selected topics in criminal justice. These courses may be used for independent study as needed. (Specific topic to be indicated when offered).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 393 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    Courses involving lectures, readings and classroom discussion of selected topics in criminal justice. These courses may be used for independent study as needed. (Specific topic to be indicated when offered).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 394 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    Courses involving lectures, readings and classroom discussion of selected topics in criminal justice. These courses may be used for independent study as needed. (Specific topic to be indicated when offered).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 395 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    Courses involving lectures, readings and classroom discussion of selected topics in criminal justice. These courses may be used for independent study as needed. (Specific topic to be indicated when offered).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 396 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    Courses involving lectures, readings and classroom discussion of selected topics in criminal justice. These courses may be used for independent study as needed. (Specific topic to be indicated when offered).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 397 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    Courses involving lectures, readings and classroom discussion of selected topics in criminal justice. These courses may be used for independent study as needed. (Specific topic to be indicated when offered).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 398 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    Courses involving lectures, readings and classroom discussion of selected topics in criminal justice. These courses may be used for independent study as needed. (Specific topic to be indicated when offered).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 399 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    Courses involving lectures, readings and classroom discussion of selected topics in criminal justice. These courses may be used for independent study as needed. (Specific topic to be indicated when offered).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205  or permission of department chair
  
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    CRJ 400 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice and Criminology


    This course will consider the primary characteristics of scientific inquiry and how these principles are applied to the study of crime and delinquency. The central focus of the course will be how to conduct empirical research. The research process will be examined including such issues as validity, reliability, causation, and operationalization. After considering the fundamental issues of research design, various observational techniques utilized most frequently in criminal justice research will be reviewed and discussed. At the conclusion of the course, the student will produce an original research project under the direction of the instructor.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 . Criminal Justice major or permission of department chair required.
  
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    CRJ 430 - Victimology


    This is an overview course covering developments in the field of Victimology, including its basic concept, its subfields and role as a field of study within criminal justice. The course also deals with the analysis of new programs and trends in the criminal justice system’s response to victims, including restorative justice initiatives. Students will also learn about the emergence of special victim groups, the implications of a victim-oriented perspective for the administration of justice, the development of victim-witness service programs, and court-ordered alternatives such as victim-offender mediation and restitution.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 . Criminal Justice major or permission of department chair required.
  
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    CRJ 440 - Profiling Violent Crimes


    An introductory study on the topic of profiling: its basic elements; the sociological and criminogenic elements; and physical and emotional factors. The course examines the use of profiling in such violent crimes as arson, sexual assault, pedophilia, murder, and kidnapping. Profiling, as an investigative tool, will be analyzed, both the pros and cons. Students will be introduced to computer database systems used for profiling, as well as geographic profiling and crime mapping as instruments for police and federal law enforcement. Particular attention will be focused on victimology, serial offenders, and the use of profilers in the media and its effect on public opinion and attitudes.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 . Criminal Justice major or permission of department chair required.
  
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    CRJ 450 - Internship in Criminal Justice


    Student participation in an off-campus, supervised work experience related to criminal justice with regular reporting to an assigned faculty member. A written report relating this work experience to the student’s course of studies will be required.
    Field Studies
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 . Criminal Justice major or permission of department chair required.
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
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    CRJ 490 - Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice


    An integration of the major areas of the criminal justice system together with the interdisciplinary programs required of all criminal justice majors (political science, psychology, and sociology). This course will synthesize the concepts and theory of the various disciplines included in the criminal justice curriculum (political science, psychology, and sociology). The course will also bring together the concepts and theory of criminal justice with areas of the general Arts and Science core curriculum.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 . Criminal Justice major or permission of department chair required.
    Capstone Course
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
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    CRJ 491 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    Courses involving lectures, readings, and classroom discussion of selected topics in criminal justice. These courses may be used for independent study as needed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  Junior standing or permisson of department chair.
    Offered When Needed
  
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    CRJ 497 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    Courses involving lectures, readings and classroom discussion of selected topics in criminal justice. These courses may be used for independent study as needed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of department chair
  
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    STA 360 - Terrorism


    This course is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive view of the methods and techniques utilized by government and private agencies to deal with international terrorism. Such topics will be considered: crisis management team selection, prevention strategies, family and corporate security procedures, vehicle security, report on disorders, Terrorism Task Force, and desk top emergency simulation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 
  
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    STA 363 - The Terrorist Mindset and Their Decision-Making Strategies


    Topics include: terrorists’ objectives, strategies, and specific methods, including “weapons systems.” The underlying causes of terrorist behavior are a fundamental consideration. The psychological, social, and legal impact of terrorism (post-traumatic stress disorder, civil liberties, etc.); various motivations of terrorists as well as common threads and themes; and the impact on counter-terrorism strategies will be examined. Some consideration on historic terrorist groups will be discussed; the main focus will be on current global terrorist threats.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 
  
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    STA 370 - Security Threat Assessment and Implementation


    This course is designed to address strategies, plans, and implementation of security issues including domestic and global threats; preventive measures to identify and stop threats involving law enforcement, military, and political as well as “soft targets,” such as schools, hospitals, government officials and private organizations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 
  
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    STA 388 - Crisis Management and Emergency Planning


    Students will be introduced to crisis management principles, strategies, tactics and communication methods that will enable them to predict, manage, and control real-world controversies. Students will work in teams developing crisis management plans for analysis and discussion and will also hone their communication skills by conducting practice media interviews in class sessions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 
  
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    STA 389 - Theory and Practice of Intelligence Gathering and Oversight


    An exploration of the U.S. Intelligence process and the use of intelligence throughout the criminal justice system. Hands-on practice with using innovative software and analyst tools to conduct link analysis. There will be an examination of ethical issues relating to intelligence collection, the analytical process and the use of force. Laws affecting the intelligence field are examined; as well as the strain of balancing the need for secrecy with the need for oversight and the public’s access to information.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CRJ 205 

Economics

  
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    ECO 100 - Economics for Today


    An introductory investigation into the components of capitalistic market economies and the current state of the aggregate U.S. economic system. An analysis of market demand, supply, pricing, profit, maximization, monetary, fiscal, and Federal Reserve policies and their effect on GDP growth, unemployment, inflation, interest rates, the budget deficit, and national debt.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not open to students who have taken ECO 201  or ECO 202 
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    ECO 201 - Basic Microeconomic Analysis


    An investigation into the components of capitalistic market economies. An analysis of market demand, supply, pricing, and production dynamics, consumer theory, producer optimization, profit maximization in differing market structures, business regulation, wage and employment levels, unions, and income inequality.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    ECO 202 - Basic Macroeconomics Analysis


    An analysis of the U.S. and other macroeconomies. Topics covered include unemployment and inflation, gross domestic product, money and banking, the Federal Reserve and monetary policy, fiscal policy, budget deficits and the national debt, international trade and the international monetary system.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    ECO 300 - Comparative Economic Growth and Development


    An analysis of diverse global economic areas, applying basic analytical tools to explore the pathways for growth. The course will examine key issues in economic development such as urbanization, population growth, education, inequality, critical institutions and globalization.

    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ECO 100  or ECO 201  

     
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Spring.

  
  •  

    ECO 301 - Economics of Labor


    An analysis, both theoretical and empirical, of labor market dynamics, wage setting and employment determination. Specific topics to be analyzed include labor force trends, education and training, wage and employment setting at the company level, unions, discrimination, labor productivity and real wages, government policy, and technological change.

    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ECO 201  
    Offered in Alternate Years.
  
  •  

    ECO 308 - Economics of Money and Banking


    An analysis of money, commercial banking and central banking with concentration on policy implementation by the Federal Reserve System and resultant economic impacts both nationally and internationally.
     
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ECO 202  
    Offered in Fall
  
  •  

    ECO 309 - Statistics for Economists


    An introduction to the analytical and decision-making techniques of statistics specifically applied to the discipline of economics by case study and example. The course also introduces model-building techniques and prepares the student to begin the study of econometrics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ECO 201 , ECO 202  
    Offered in Fall
  
  •  

    ECO 310 - Econometrics


    A laboratory approach to economics which presents methods for quantitative testing of socio-economic theories. The course focuses on the multiple regression model and covers hypothesis testing and forecasting. In addition to the classical regression model, the course will examine qualitative choice and simultaneous equations models. The course will utilize computerized statistical programs extensively.

     
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ECO 309 , BUS 210  , MTH 270  , MTH 432  , PSY 323  , POL 305  or SOC 350  
    Capstone Course. Written Intensive. Offered in Spring.
  
  •  

    ECO 315 - Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis


    A study of consumer demand, costs of production, market structure, resource allocation, equilibrium analysis and welfare economics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ECO 201  and MTH 134  or MTH 231  
    Offered in Spring
  
  •  

    ECO 316 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis


    The essentials of the theory and measurement of economic aggregates and the application of these concepts to major economic problems: employment, growth, business and price fluctuations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ECO 202  
    Offered in Fall
  
  •  

    ECO 335 - Current Economic Issues


    The study of selected economic issues relevant to today’s society. The emphasis is upon the present state of the economy; problems relating to the urban crisis, resource scarcity, welfare, unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and ecology will usually be discussed.
     
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ECO 100 , ECO 201  or ECO 202  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ECO 345 - Economics of Industrial Organization


    An examination of the structure of industries in the U.S. and how that structure affects industry conduct and economic performance. The course will focus on government attempts to alter the structure, conduct and performance of industries through enactment and enforcement of legislation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ECO 201  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ECO 355 - The FED Challenge


    The purpose of this course is to undertake an intensive study of the US macro economy, the Federal Reserve System and the implementation of appropriate monetary policy. The course requires students not only to learn about the inter-workings of monetary policy, but also to work in a team environment, conduct independent research, and develop their presentation and communication skills. The course culminates in a competition at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York where students from various colleges present their policy prescriptions to senior FED officials and business executives.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ECO 201 , ECO 202  and approval of department chair
    Oral Intensive. Offered in the Fall Semester.
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ECO 370 - Environmental Economics and Sustainable Development


    This course examines the relationship between the environment and socioeconomic systems. An economic framework is used to identify the causes of environmental problems and their potential solutions. The course is interdisciplinary, incorporating material from the natural sciences, in examining the issue of sustainable development.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ECO 201  
    Oral Intensive.
    Offered in Alternate Years.
  
  •  

    ECO 380 - Health Economics


    This course will apply economic analysis to the health care sector. Burgeoning expenditures and the rapidly changing regulatory environment, emphasizing cost containment and competition, have made economic analysis particularly relevant for the study of health care issues.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ECO 201  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ECO 395 - Special Topics in Economics


    This course will offer students the opportunity to study in an area of specialization in Economics that is not covered by existing courses. The specific topic will reflect the interests of the instructor and will be listed when the course is offered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ECO 404 - Business and Financial Cycles


    An analysis of the nature and causes of the business cycle: past, present and future. Investigation concentrates on the measurement of economic fluctuations, pertinent theory, generating factors, stabilizing policies and historical experience, stressing practical applications and forecasting.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ECO 201 , ECO 202 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    ECO 409 - History of Economic Ideas


    A historical and analytical survey of the contributions of the leading economists and the various schools of economic thought.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ECO 201 , ECO 202  
    Written Intensive. Offered in Spring.
  
  •  

    ECO 415 - Economics of Global Resources


    A geographic analysis of world resources: agricultural, mineral, technological and human. A study of resource patterns, world interdependence in primary commodities, problems of ‘cartelization’ and their implications for industrialization and economic development and well-being of nations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ECO 416 - International Economics


    An analysis of the commercial and financial relations between the US and the rest of the world, covering topics ranging from trade to foreign exchange rates, with in-depth studies of exchange rates, balance of payments and trade restrictions. The development of the international monetary system will be given special emphasis, including a detailed comparison of floating exchange rates with workings of the gold standard and the Bretton Woods systems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ECO 201 , ECO 202 . ECO 316  is desirable but not required
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Fall.
  
  •  

    ECO 431 - Managerial Economics


    Applied microeconomic theory in business management, stressing basic decision making models and techniques.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ECO 201 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    ECO 435 - Mathematical Applications in Economics


    The purpose of this course is to utilize mathematical analysis, e.g., matrix algebra, differential calculus, maximization and minimization techniques, and integral calculus, to examine topics in economics. Such topics will include general equilibrium, consumer choice, macroeconomic models, production and pricing theory, inventory control, input-output models, and others.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ECO 201 , ECO 202 , MTH 232 , or equivalent
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ECO 450 - Internship in Economics


    Students are placed in public agencies or private businesses under the direct supervision of an executive of the organization. Students must consult on a scheduled basis with a faculty member. A report must be prepared based on this learning experience and approved by both the faculty member and the supervising executive.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ECO 460 - Seminar in Economic Analysis


    Covers topics in micro and macro economics, economic history and theory, and contemporary problems; emphasis of a particular seminar to be determined by the instructor.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ECO 491 - Economic Research


    An introduction to economic research aimed at synthesizing theoretical analysis and empirical investigation. Research on topics of interest to students and faculty.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 1
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required

Education

Note: All courses in the Education Department incorporate and apply New York State Learning Standards for K-12 in the implementation of instructional strategies and requires a field experience as well as an electronic portfolio.

  
  •  

    EDU 201 - Principles and Procedures of Education


    The principles of learning and their relation to elementary and secondary school classroom techniques will be studied. Such topics as effective teaching, classroom organization, instructional planning, assessment and evaluation, instructional outcomes, methods and materials, classroom management, meeting the needs of learners in a diverse society and the use of technology will be explored through problem solving activities and projects. The New York State Learning Standards will be used in creating lesson plans. Field experiences are required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    EDU 202 - Foundations of Educational Theory


    This course investigates the historical, legal, social, and philosophical foundations of education and their impact on contemporary schools and education and relationships to changing approaches to issues in the schools. The New York State Learning Standards and their impact on schools and curriculum will be discussed. Field experiences are required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Sophomore status
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    EDU 203 - Frameworks for the Education of All Children in Inclusive Settings


    This course provides teacher candidates with the foundation for educating all young children from birth through grade 2. Course participants will learn the benchmarks of social, emotional, physical, cognitive, linguistic, and aesthetic growth and development of all young children, including children from diverse homes and cultural contexts, as well as those with special needs. Significant issues influencing early childhood education, as well as the guidelines and principles that inform developmentally appropriate practices are basic to this course. A field experience is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Sophomore status
    Offered in the Summer
  
  •  

    EDU 210 - An Introduction to Special Education


    This course provides the foundations for teachers of special education and exceptional students. Included within the course are effective practices for co-teaching and collaboration with peers; comprehending different disabilities categories; identification and remediation of disabilities; Special education process-State and Fed laws and regulations; individualizing instruction and applying positive behavioral supports and interventions to address student and classroom management needs. Course requirements include a ten-hour field experience in special education classrooms, grades 1-12 and submission of the major assessment to TaskStream.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    EDU 250 - Field Experience I


    Teacher candidates will participate in a series of classroom observations in elementary, middle and/or high schools with diverse populations. The candidates will be grouped in “intervention teams” and be assigned to schools as a cohort. They will observe the school routines, participate in tutorial experiences and cooperate with classroom teachers. Candidates will develop an understanding of strategies for classroom management, standards-based instruction and assessment, as well as how to integrate technology. Students will maintain a personal log of observation and participation. There will be one formal observation by the field work supervisor during which time the candidate will provide instruction to some or all of the students.
    Field Studies
    Credits: 1
    Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    EDU 335 - Introduction and Assessment for Teaching Young Children in Inclusive Settings: Birth - Grade 2


    Teacher candidates will learn to design and implement a curriculum that is responsive to the needs of all young children, including those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, as well as children who are special learners. Developmentally appropriate instruction that integrates authentic assessment to monitor the growth and development of young children will be emphasized in this course. A field experience is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Summer
  
  •  

    EDU 337 - Instruction & Assessment Strategies on the Secondary Level


    This course is designed to assist aspiring teachers in exploring a variety of instructional strategies and techniques, learning theories, and assessment and evaluation approaches appropriate for meeting the needs of learners in diverse middle and secondary classrooms. Opportunities are provided to experience various instructional strategies from the perspectives of student and teacher and to implement them into actual lesson planning and presentations. The integration of technology, the New York State Learning Standards, and content area standards into unit and lesson planning is investigated. Field observation experiences in the student’s content area are required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    EDU 350 - Field Experience II


    As a continuation of their experience in EDU 250 , teacher candidates will participate in another series of classroom observations in elementary, middle and/or high schools with diverse populations. As before, they will observe the school routines, participate in tutorial experiences and cooperate with classroom teachers. Candidates will develop an understanding of strategies for classroom management, standards-based instruction and assessment, as well as how to integrate technology. Students will maintain a personal log of observation and participation. There will be one formal observation by the field work supervisor during which time the candidate will provide instruction to some or all of the students.
    Field Studies
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: EDU 250  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    EDU 370 - Literacy Acquisition and Development in Children: Birth - Grade 6


    This course emphasizes the acquisition and the development of language and literacy in children. The teaching of reading and writing as construction processes within a well-balanced literacy program will be emphasized, an appropriate model for instructing children in inclusive classrooms. Teacher candidates will learn to use instructional strategies with children who are linguistically and culturally diverse, as well as those who have a wide range of special needs. Assessment strategies to monitor literacy growth, the use of technology to support literacy, and the selection and use of developmentally appropriate materials are included in this course. A field experience is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    EDU 373 - Instruction and Assessment Strategies for Learning Mathematics for All Children


    This course will emphasize the active hands-on problem solving approach to teaching, learning, and assessing mathematics as stated in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and the New York State Learning Standards. Strategies that enable students to make sense of mathematics and to develop their own meaning of mathematical concepts and processes will be investigated. A field experience is required and involves observing and participating in mathematics instruction within the classroom setting.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Approval Required. Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    EDU 374 - Literacy and Learning in the Middle and Secondary Schools


    Going beyond the traditional view of reading and writing, this course embraces the challenges of literate societies within the twenty-first century which demand students to acquire multiple literacies. Teacher candidates will learn how to use a wide array of instructional strategies that integrate all language modes, as well as other tools of learning into the subject areas they teach. For more effective instruction and learning within inclusive classrooms, course participants will begin to use differentiated teaching with students who have special needs and with those who are culturally and linguistically diverse. A field experience is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    EDU 375 - Literacy Across the Curriculum: Teaching Reading in the Content Areas, Grade 7 - 12


    This course focuses on the nature of the reading process as it relates to comprehending text in the content areas. An instructional framework will be presented that can be used to instruct all students, including those with special needs and those who are linguistically and culturally diverse, as they read text from different disciplines. Assessing students’ reading levels for the purpose of providing differential instruction and matching levels of texts is a major objective. A field experience is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    EDU 380 - Constructing Literacy Portfolios for Effective Teaching


    This course will examine a variety of assessment strategies that may be used to monitor and document literacy growth and development of all children in inclusive classrooms.  Using assessment data to inform instruction, teacher candidates will utilize differential instructional strategies with struggling readers and writers, with students who have a broad range of learning disabilities, and with children from bilingual and ESL homes.  This course will emphasize the use of authentic assessment as an on-going process that is linked to instruction and includes the preparation  of teacher candidates for the administration of standardized tests.  This course requires a field experience.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: EDU 370  and EDU 382  
    Oral Intensive. Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    EDU 382 - An Integrated Approach to Teaching Language Arts


    Teacher candidates will learn how to design a language arts curriculum that integrates literacy in the multiple disciplines of learning and addresses the NYS English Language Arts Standards. Learning to differentiate instruction for effective teaching, course particpants will use a wide variety of literacy strategies appropriate with students who have special needs, as well as children who are culturally and linguistically diverse. An emphasis within this course is the use of children’s literature and technology to broaden students’ conceptual knowledge while developing all their modes of language use: reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and representing visually and graphically. A field experience is required in this course.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite EDU 370  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
    Written Intensive
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    EDU 383 - Instruction and Assessment for Teaching Social Studies to All Children


    Students as teacher candidates will acquire instructional strategies and assessment skills to teach social studies to elementary school children. This course will develop knowledge, concepts, values, and critical thinking skills through the creation of lesson plans and unit themes drawing on disciplines within the social sciences and the humanties. It adapts instructional strategies to meet the needs of the diverse range of student abilities. Specifically, it includes provision for addressing the learning requirements of children with special needs and with varied linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Students are taught how to use technology to enhance learning and educational research. A basic foundation of this course is that students understand and promote rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a democratic and pluralistic society. Successful completion of course objectives will be measured through varied and authentic means of assessment. Field observation experiences of social studies lessons are required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    EDU 384 - Instructional and Assessment Strategies for Teaching Science to Children in Inclusive Classrooms


    Teacher candidates will become familiar with strategies that require students to become active learners of science. Assessment strategies will be integrated with instruction. Course participants will become familiar with the New York State Learning Standards and their application to the diverse needs of students in inclusive classrooms. Field observation is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    EDU 388 - Learning Needs of the Middle School Student


    This course will provide students with in-depth study of the ten to fourteen-year old child. Readings will focus upon the learning needs and learning styles of the child in middle school grades. The place of the middle school within the school structure will be analyzed. The course will enable students to develop the skills necesary to serve as a mentor to students within this age catergory It will be necessary for students to work with middle school children in a non-academic setting on a weekly basis. A field experience is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Summer
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    EDU 389 - Teaching Strategies for the Middle School Student


    This course will focus upon the strategies which are most commonly used in the middle school setting. Particular emphasis will be placed upon cooperative learning, team teaching, whole language, technology and interdisciplinary study. As part of the course requirements, students will be required to work as an interdisciplinary team. Students will also be required to spend time each week observing middle school students in an academic setting.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Approval Required. Offered in the Summer
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    EDU 462 - Observation and Student Teaching for Adolescence Education, Grades 7 - 12


    A structured college-supervised teaching experience is provided in selected middle and high schools, grades 7 through 12.  Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to plan and execute instructional activities, monitor and assess student learning consistent with higher educational standards, develop classroom management skills and perform other related duties while creating meaningful learning experiences for students in classrooms having diverse needs.  This field experience is an integral part of the professional education curriculum and allows candidates to demonstrate competence in the professional roles for which they are preparing.  Applications for enrollment must be submitted to the Education Department by September 30 in the Fall semester, for Spring term enrollment, and February 1 of the Spring semester, for Fall term enrollment.  A minimum of 15 weeks of full-time practice teaching and observation is required under the direction of the student teacher supervisor and the cooperating teacher(s).  A weekly seminar takes place on campus.
    Student Teaching
    Credits: 9
    Oral and Written Intensive. Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
 

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