2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Jun 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

Education

Note: All courses in the Education Department incorporate and apply New York State Learning Standards for K-12 in the implementation of instructional strategies and requires a field experience as well as an electronic portfolio.

  
  •  

    EDU 466 - Observation and Student Teaching at the Childhood Level


    A structured college-supervised teaching experience is provided in selected elementary schools at grades 1 through 3 and 4 through 6. Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to assume increased responsibilities for instruction, consistent with higher educational standards, conduct assessments, develop classroom management skills and perform other related duties for students in classrooms having diverse needs. This field experience is an integral part of the professional education curriculum and allows candidates to demonstrate competence in the professional roles for which they are preparing. Applications for enrollment must be submitted to the Education Department by September 30 in the Fall semester, for Spring term enrollment, and February 1 of the Spring semester, for Fall term enrollment. A minimum of 15 weeks of full-time practice teaching and observation is required under the direction of the student teacher supervisor and the cooperating teacher(s). A weekly seminar takes place on campus.
    Student Teaching
    Credits: 9
    Oral Intensive Offered in the Fall Semester Written Intensive Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
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    EDU 467 - Observation and Student Teaching at the Early Childhood and Childhood Level


    A structured college-supervised teaching experience is provided in selected early childhood settings (Pre-K - Grade 2) and selected childhood settings (Grades 1- 6).  Teacher candidates will have the opportunity to assume increased responsibilities for instruction consistent with higher educational standards, conduct assessments, develop classroom management skills and perform other related duties in classrooms having diverse student populations.  This field experience is an integral part of the professional educational curriculum and allows candidates to demonstrate competence in the professional roles for which they are preparing.  Applications for enrollment must be submitted to the Education Department by September 30 in the Fall semester, for Spring term enrollment, and by February 1 in the Spring semester, for Fall term enrollment.  A minimum of 15 weeks of full-time practice is required under the direction of the student teacher supervisor and the cooperating teacher(s).  A weekly seminar takes place on campus.
    Student Teaching
    Credits: 9
    Oral and Written Intensive. Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
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    EDU 480 - Teacher Work Sample


    Course participants will be engaged in a supervised practicum with students in partnership schools. Course participants will use their content and pedagogical knowledge and skills to create a Teacher Work Sample Project. The Teacher Work Sample project will consist of three parts; planning, instruction, and assessment. Application for the practicum must be submitted prior to placement and course registration; approval by the Education Department is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: EDU 462 , EDU 466  or EDU 467 
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required

English

  
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    CDS 1124 - How to Read a Film


    Whereas from infancy we are taught how to read words, our visual literacy is often neglected. This situation needs to be rectified in a society that sees more movies than it reads books. This study of film’s ‘grammar’ gives us a better understanding of how film messages are conveyed and an awareness of how film techniques can influence our perceptions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
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    ENG 110 - Introduction to Critical Writing


    This course focuses on the basic structures and skills necessary for college level writing and research, including: organization of various kinds of essays; drafting and revising; grammar, syntax, punctuation and usage; and research.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    ENG 120 - Communication Skills: Writing I


    An introduction to the principles of correct and effective composition, requiring frequent writing assignments, analysis of prose, and the study of research techniques. Some students will be required to register for the Writing Workshop (ENG 109) while they are enrolled in ENG 120 . Course graded on an A, B+, B, C+, C or U basis. Normally completed in the freshman year. Not open to students who have taken ENG 1101.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    ENG 121 - Communication Skills: Advanced Writing II


    A continuation of ENG 120 , emphasizing through frequent writing assignments the varieties of form and style in English prose. For the student wishing to develop further writing skills.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120 
    Offered When Needed
  
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    ENG 122 - Communication Skills: Advanced Composition


    An enriched alternative to ENG 120 , emphasizing a variety of writing activities to be offered to students by department selection. Course graded on an A, B+, B, C+, C, or U basis.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    ENG 203 - Foundations and Traditions of Literature


    Major authors and works from the classical period through the Enlightenment; close reading of texts organized by genre, including Epic/Narrative, Tragedy, Comedy, Lyric, Poetry, and Romance.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 120 
    Offered in the Fall Semester Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    ENG 204 - Literature of the Modern World


    Building upon the foundation of pre-modern literature established in ENG 203 , this course presents the modern development and evolution of literary modes and themes found in narrative, drama, and poetry. With reference to, but moving beyond traditional notions of literary forms or genres, the course explores new literary paradigms such as the novel and short story. Simultaneously, the course introduces the topic of literary criticism. further developing the students’ skills in close reading and critical analysis.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENG 203 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    ENG 212 - Self and Society


    Students will be introduced to the broad outlines of the English literary tradition through an encounter with texts drawn from multiple periods of English literary history, as well as being exposed to the dialogue between the Western and non-Western literary traditions.  Literature is a special form this conversation takes: poems, narrative prose, and drama stories provide unique affective, experiential, and cognitive modes of understanding which shape how we understand the application of this conversation to contemporary life.  In this course, we will explore different kinds of relations between the self and society, such as between the self and family, self and community, and self and the nation.  We will examine how these texts raise questions about the self’s relation to society as a social convention, about the way individuals resist or adopt those social conventions, about our identities as raced, gendered, and embodied beings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall Winter & Spring Semester
  
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    ENG 213 - Transformations


    Students will be introduced to the broad outlines of the English literary tradition through an encounter with texts drawn from multiple periods of English literary history, as well as be exposed to the dialogue between the Western and non-Western literary traditions.  This option for the English Core introduces you to a selection of texts that, in one way or another, take choice as their subject. How has the idea of choice changed or evolved over time and across cultures? How have the various iterations influenced one another? Literature is in constant conversation with not only the world from which it springs, but with other literature as well. Thus, we will focus on the transformation of genres, themes, and ideas as the result of these conversations, while paying special attention to how that conversation in the West has responded to new voices.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
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    ENG 214 - New Worlds


    Students will be introduced to the broad outlines of the English literary tradition through an encounter with texts drawn from multiple periods of English literary history, as well as be exposed to the dialogue between the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This option for the English Core will introduce you to a selection of major literary texts that investigate or offer new worlds to their readers. The premise of this core course is that these works are practical. By working with them, we will hone our ability to read texts, our worlds, each other, and ourselves. The course will emphasize how literature has given us new ways of thinking about past and future, old worlds and new.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
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    ENG 308 - Major Works of Shakespeare


    The Major Works of Shakespeare guides students as they read, analyze, discuss, and craft academic essays about some of Shakespeare’s seminal plays-histories like Henry V, comedies like As You Like It, tragedies like Hamlet, and romances like A Winter’s Tale.  Students will learn how to close read such texts within a variety of historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts.  This course satisfies the Shakespeare requirement for English majors and Education majors with English Concentration.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
  
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    ENG 310 - Shakespeare on Film


    Shakespeare’s plays have been appearing on film since the development of film in the late 19th century. Filmmakers have generally followed one of three trends in presenting Shakespeare on film: filming a staged version of the play; developing a story line inspired by a Shakespearean play; or translating Shakespeare’s plays directly into the film media, creating a cinematic adaptation that makes use of all of the opportunities film provides. This seminar focuses primarily on the third category of Shakespeare on film. We will examine how contemporary filmmakers translate their interpretations of the Shakespeare plays to the cinema and how those translations then affect our readings of the plays. By attending to the decisions of the actors, directors, cinematographers, and editors, we will deepen our understanding of Shakespeare’s texts and of the medium of film.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
  
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    ENG 313 - Milton


    A study of the full range of Milton’s poetry; assessment of his reception and importance in the twentieth century.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 314 - Introduction to Literary Studies


    An introduction for the newly declared English major to the discipline of literary study. An exploration of the salient features of fiction, poetry, and drama in conjunction with a critical examination of primary texts and of the varieties of critical writing and research that their study requires.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in the Fall Semester. Written Intensive. Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
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    ENG 315 - New Contexts and Voices in Literary Studies


    Complementing ENG 314  , this seminar introduces students to major critical and theoretical approaches while considering the diversity of literary works and authors. Intensive work with historical and critical contexts develops interpretive practices, hones digital research skills, and introduces databases and resources used in contemporary literary study. The course culminates in a major independent or collaborative project.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  

     
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in Fall, Winter & Spring Semester

  
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    ENG 332 - The Eighteenth-Century Novel


    A study of the origins, or “rise” of the novel as a literary genre and socio-cultural phenomenon between 1660 and 1810.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    ENG 333 - English Drama from the Restoration to the Present


    A study of English drama from the sophisticated comedies of the Restoration to the work of such moderns as Shaw and Pinter.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 334 - The Classic English Novel


    A study of selected works from the nineteenth century up to World War I, tracing the development of the genre in the works of authors such as Austen, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, and Conrad.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 335 - The Twentieth-Century British Novel


    A study of selected great novels of the twentieth century, beginning with the innovative work of Joyce and Woolf and examining further developments up to the present in the novels of writers such as Lawrence, Greene, Waugh, Murdoch, McEwan, Powell and Drabble.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 339 - World Drama


    This course is a study of the world drama from the beginnings in ancient Greece to the most recent works of contemporary playwrights. Areas to be covered include classical drama, the medieval stage, Renaissance drama, the Restoration, melodrama, realism, the Theatre of the Absurd, and contemporary drama.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 343 - Irish Literature


    While focusing on the Irish Renaissance (the period between 1880 and 1930), reading and discussion will also examine literature written before and after the renaissance, to include such writers as Edgeworth and Moore, Yeats and Joyce, Synge and Lady Gregory, Boland and Heaney, Friel and MacLaverty.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 348 - Science Fiction


    Science Fiction has always pushed the boundaries of what the human mind can imagine, and the kind of futures the human mind desires. This course will examine some seminal works in the history of science fiction, understood broadly, in both their literary and film versions, and attempt to understand how each medium treats the characters, themes, values, and visions of each work.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120 or ENG 122 
    2) Either ENG 204, ENG 212, ENG 213 or ENG 214 
    Offered in the Fall, Winter and Spring
    Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Scientific Reasoning
  
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    ENG 351 - Classical Mythology


    An introduction to the myths of ancient Greece and Rome from primary texts, ancient artistic renditions, and Renaissance and more recent (re-)interpretations of those myths.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
  
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    ENG 352 - Shifting Selves


    This course aims to explore different conceptions of identity, contact, and cultural belonging. By reading various works of contemporary literature and other cultural texts from different humanities, social science, and science disciplines, it will unpack some of the ways in which identities are socially and culturally constructed. The course will study those constructions of identity in order to ask how one participates and/or does not participate in their making and how one negotiates them. Furthermore, the course will deliberate on the ways in which one’s personal identity is also constituted by one’s memories of the past. Accordingly, it will examine the relationship between what we remember and our conceptions of who we are in relation to our past selves, other people, and even digital technologies. It will also explore how one’s embodied self can both bear the inscription of the prevailing idea one’s identity and disrupt those ideas. Instead of taking individual identity as a given set of unchanging qualities, over the course of the semester the class will consider the shifting relationship among the identity, contact, and belonging.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Fall, Winter & Spring Semester. ICT Core Theme Centerpiece: Identity
  
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    ENG 353 - Narratives of Violence


    The goal of this course is to analyze how representations of violence in literature, media, and art shape our understandings of various kinds of violence and the impulses behind specific violent events throughout history. We will examine the interplay between grand narratives of violence (e.g. revolutions, national beginnings, new political orders) and personal accounts of memory, loss, and trauma. Ultimately, we will map similarities and differences among seemingly disparate forms of violence, such as physical, psychological, political, economic, epistemic, cultural, interpersonal, and personal.

    In this study, we will reflect on some of the following questions: how do frames of violence, conflict, and peace shape our understanding of these events? What rhetorical strategies produce the effect of official or unbiased accounts of conflict, and what kinds of representations seem personal or biased? What comparisons can we make among different narratives of intention and harm? From whose point of view are these stories of conflict constructed? And how do these acts of narration shape influential conversations about culpability, harm, resources, and healing in literature, art, and culture?
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Violence. Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    ENG 354 - Playing at the Edges: Innovation and Non-Normativity


    In this course, students will study how innovation is often a product of difference, rather than merely disruption. In so doing, they will adopt an interdisciplinary approach to explore how innovative thinking often requires certain distance from the dictations of normativity. Informed by case studies in literature, technology, music, dance, film, fashion, architecture, and more, they will ask how normativity often impedes rather than promotes discovery.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Integrated Core Theme Centerpiece: Innovation. Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    ENG 355 - East Asian Literature in Translation


    Reading and discussion of major works and writers of China and Japan beginning with ancient times, and including such twentieth century works as ‘Rashomon’ and ‘Snow Country.’
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 358 - Advanced Writing : Strategies and Skills


    A course devoted to the theory and practice of effective writing for English majors, minors, and non-majors (juniors and seniors with permission of instructor). In addition to reading assignments in literature and expository essays, the course will focus in student writing, particularly analytical writing, and will address how to formulate a strong thesis, organize arguments, and use secondary sources. The focus on student writing will refine the skills nesessary for the workplace, the elementary/secondary classroom, and/or graduate school.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years. Written Intensive.
  
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    ENG 360 - Nineteenth-Century American Romanticism and Realism


    A study of major works and themes of the Romantic and Realistic movements in nineteenth century American literature.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 362 - Eugene O’Neill and his Influences


    This course will study Eugene O’Neill’s major works as well as the writers that influenced O’Neill, including Greek tragedy, the plays of Ibsen and Strindberg, and the melodrama that made and destroyed his father’s acting career.  The course will also study a range of works that demonstrate O’Neill’s lasting influence on playwrights in the twentieth and twenty-first century.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    ENG 364 - Modern American Theater


    Reading and discussion of major works and trends in American drama from the early plays of O’Neill to the present.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 365 - African American Literature


    This course examines a variety of African American writers. Emphasis will be on the development of African American literacy traditions and how contemporary writers have interpreted these traditions. Writers to be considered in the course may be drawn from the 18th, 19th or 20th centuries and may include such figures as Phillis Wheatley, Fredrick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Nella Larsen, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and Toni Morrison.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 367 - Modern American Poetry


    A study of the development of American poetry in the twentieth century emphasizing major poets from T.S. Eliot to the present.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 368 - Modern American Fiction


    A study of the techniques, structures and themes in the fiction of major American writers of the first half of the twentieth century.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ENG 369 - Special Studies in Themes in American Literature


    An intensive study of a significant theme which appears in the works of major writers and reflects a particularly American problem or point of view such as “The Mythic Dimension of American Literature,” “The American Catholic Experience,” “Ethnicity and Identity,” or “African American Literature.”
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 370 - Contemporary American Fiction


    An examination of the themes and forms of American fiction from the 1960’s to the present.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    ENG 372 - Multicultural Writers of America


    An advanced survey of American literature that focuses upon multicultural themes and perspectives. Literary texts from several ethnic groups (African American, Asian American, Jewish American, Latino, and Native American) will foreground a discussion of such topics as assimilation, displacement, and bicultural identity.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
  
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    ENG 378 - Children’s Literature


    This course is a critical survey of children’s literature.  Specific course interests include the history of the genre, the position of children’s literature within educational curricula and culture at large, and the cultural construction of children and childhood.  The course focuses on children’s texts as literature and will examine the literary techniques and conventions employed in course material.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ENG 380 - Literature for Young Adults


    This course is a critical survey of young adult literature.  Specific course interests include the history of the genre, the position of young adult literature within educational curricula and culture at large, and the ways texts for adolescents reflect the development of the adolescent, particularly in relation to social and political power structures.  The course focuses on young adult texts as literature and will examine the literary techniques and conventions employed in course material.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
  
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    ENG 384 - Images of Women in Modern American Literature


    This course provides an intensive study of the presentation of women in the works of major American writers from the turn of the century to the present.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. ICT Core Theme Centerpiece: Feminist Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ENG 389 - Climate Change Literature


    What stories do we tell to make sense of the increasingly erratic changes in our climate, and our part in it? Over the last three hundred years, we have repeatedly asked what it means to be “human,” to belong to the nature, or to have a will that is free from the dictates of nature. How we have answered these questions has sometimes bound us to further destruction of the earth and humanity, and at other times provided grounds for resisting extractive relations to the earth and to other beings. In this course we will read literary works about climate change, different ecological relations, and ideas of humanity. In our readings we will explore different literary narratives of ecological changes and their attendant worldviews.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120 or ENG 122 
    2) Either ENG 204, ENG 212, ENG 213 or ENG 214 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
     
  
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    ENG 399 - Linguistics and History of English Language


    This course will focus on two topics. First, it will study the descriptive and analytical concepts of structural linguistics. Second, it will study origin, relationships, and the evolution of the English language.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
  
  •  

    ENG 401 - Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales


    A study of Chaucer against the background of his age, with special reference to his language, style, and poetic technique, emphasizing ‘The Canterbury Tales.’
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    ENG 402 - Medieval Literature


    This course is intended to give students a sense of the breath and diversity of medieval English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the late fifteenth century. We will read various works against a changing gistorical and linguistic backdrop and consider how both content and reflect and reinforce their times.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
  
  •  

    ENG 405 - Seventeenth-Century British Literature: The World Turned Upside Down


    In the seventeenth century, England experienced dramatic social and political changes: a king was tried and executed for treason; opposing political, religious, and social factions waged battles in pring; puritans emigrated to the New World; men and women argued over the value of womankind; and scientific empiricism and instrumentation began to contend with religious worldviews. As a period in literary history, the century is frequently divided into an Age of Milton (or Donne) and an Age of Dryden. Reading representative works in the major genres of the century, we will attempt to understand the processes of change and the persistence of continuities in its literature.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
  
  •  

    ENG 407 - Chaucer: Troilus and Criseyde and the Minor Poems


    A close analysis of Chaucer’s emerging poetic power, with special emphasis on “Troilus and Criseyde.”
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ENG 409 - Ideas and Ideals in the English Renaissance


    A study of the types of literary expression in the English Renaissance, with emphasis on such major figures in prose, poetry, and drama as More, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Marlowe.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ENG 412 - The Metaphysical Poets of the Seventeenth Century


    A thorough study of the love poetry, sexual and divine, of the greatest of these poets, John Donne, and consideration of others such as Herbert, Vaughan, and Marvell.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ENG 416 - Early American Literature


    This course is a critical survey of American literature to 1800, exploring works written by indigenous writers, African American writers, early European explorers and settlers, eighteenth-century colonists, and citizens of the new nation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ENG 423 - English Literature of the Eighteenth Century


    This course examines the literature of the “long” eighteenth-century (1660-1792) and recognizes the transatlantic circulation of ideas and literature between America and England in that period. At the same time, it explores the global eighteenth century and the issues which derive from its study. These may include the purpose of satire, the rise of the novel, the importance of the “Orient” in Western thought, the institution of slavery, the status of “pre-romanticism,” and the emergence of the author as cultural hero.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    ICT Core Theme Centerpiece: Thomas Paine. Offered in Alternate Years.
  
  •  

    ENG 430 - The Romantic Poets: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley and Byron


    A study of the Romantics’ modernity of thought, rebellion against literary tradition, and psychological insights. The Romantics’ attitudes about political reform, the role of the writer in society, and women and love are also discussed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ENG 432 - The Victorian Age


    The course examines Victorian literature as it reflects the dominant forces of the age. Specific topics include industrialization, gender roles, and colonialism. Texts will be drawn from a range of genres and authors, including George Eliot, Alfred Tennyson, Charles Dickens, and Elizabeth Gaskell.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ENG 440 - Special Studies in Themes in British Literature


    A study of a significant theme or tradition which appears in the works of major writers, such as: ‘The Shakespearean Film’, ‘The Arthurian Tradition,’ and ‘The Catholic Experience in Modern British Fiction.’
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ENG 443 - Special Topics in World Literature


    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
  
  •  

    ENG 444 - Post Colonial Literature


    This course examines the literatures written in English that have emerged from regions or countries formerly colonized by England and the United States, such as Africa, Australia, New Zealand, India, Ireland, the Philippines, and the Caribbean. Topics to be considered may include: the processes of colonization and de-colonization; the problem of writing in the colonizer’s language; the use of postcolonial criticism and theory; and the question of what “postcolonial” means to different writers. Writers to be studied may include: Salman Rushdie, Seamus Heaney, Keri Hulme, Jessica Hagedorn, J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Chinua Achebe, and Derek Walcott, among others.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ENG 450 - Creative Writing: Drama


    Students will learn the fundamentals of playwrighting through reading and writing plays and discussing the elements of drama.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204  , ENG 212  , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Fall, Winter & Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ENG 451 - Creative Writing: Poetry


    Studies and practice in the writing of poetry. Classes will be geared to individual needs. Student writing will be discussed and evaluated individually and in groups.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    ENG 452 - Creative Writing Fiction


    Studies and practice in the writing of fiction. Classes will be geared to individual needs. Student writing will be discussed and evaluated individually and in groups.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    ENG 453 - Creative Nonfiction


    Creative nonfiction–also known as “literature of fact” or “the fourth genre” (after drama, poetry, and fiction)-is fact-based writing that deploys such literary devices as narrative, setting and character development.  It comes in many forms, including the personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, cultural criticism, travelogue, nature writing, and documentary.  This course will focus on one or more of these forms, and include sample readings, weekly writing assignments, and regular workshopping of student work.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204  , ENG 212  , ENG 213  or ENG 214 
    Offered in Fall, Winter & Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ENG 454 - Digital Age Writing, Reading and Living


     A brief introduction to “Digital Humanities” that familiarizes students with the tools, concepts, and debates concerning arts and letters in an increasingly networked age. Part literary studies, part cultural studies, and part composition studies, this triangulated exploration probes how the “digital turn” has impacted the way we think, read, and write. Students will engage network fiction, acquire digital writing skills, and theorize about how to create value and meaning in a critical internet culture. Finally, students will explore what digital approaches have in common with older forms of rhetoric and aged technologies and will discover how digital practices have ushered in new forms and motivated new aesthetics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    ICT Core Theme Centerpiece: Revolutions
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ENG 467 - Modern British and Commonwealth Poetry


    A study of the development of British poetry in the twentieth century, emphasizing major poets from Yeats to the present.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ENG 470 - Literature Seminar


    Research and readings in selected authors and topics.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    ENG 480 - Internship in English


    Participation as a trainee in an off-campus or on-campus working experience related to the student’s interests within the English major. A paper evaluating this experience and periodic reports to a faculty advisor are required.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    The prerequisites for all ENG courses at the 300 and 400 level are as follows:
    1) Either ENG 120  or ENG 122  
    2) Either ENG 204 , ENG 212 , ENG 213  or ENG 214  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ENG 481 - Senior Project


    Students will engage in a semester-long project under the guidance of a faculty mentor.  Projects will allow students to pursue areas of interest in greater depth; to create substantial work that will serve as a centerpiece for their academic portfolios; and to demonstrate subject knowledge and critical skills in any of the following forms:
    1) A traditional thesis of no fewer than 7500 words
    2) An archival research project
    3) A 45 minute lecture (ENGTalk), to be presented and recorded before a live audience of peers
    4) A digital project (blog, podcast, eJournal, etc.)
    Students are encouraged, but not required to use the Project to develop an interest arising from previous coursework.
    Eligibility Requirements:
    –3.5 major GPA
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 120  /ENG 122  , and ENG 203  , ENG 204  or ENG 212  , ENG 213  or ENG 214  , ENG 314  , senior status, 3.3 Major GPA, permission of department chair and faculty mentor, completed Senior Project Proposal Form
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ENG 499 - Senior Seminar: Literature and Criticism


    Intensive study and discussion of a group of literary works and of criticism applicable to those works to provide a capstone experience for the College Core and for the major.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  ENG 120  /ENG 122  , ENG 203  , ENG 204  , ENG 212  , ENG 213  or ENG 214  , Senior Standing
    Capstone Course.
    Open to Seniors Only.
    Oral and Written Intensive.
    Offered in Fall & Spring.
  
  •  

    FLM 350 - Film


    A study of the way film works as communication, as art/entertainment and as an industry. Developing styles, types of film, and various approaches to criticism will be discussed. The course will include viewing, discussion and written analysis of feature films, shorts and excerpts from the origins of film to the present.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    FLM 351 - Film History


    A study of selected topics in cinematic history from the silent era, such as the development of the classic tradition, the interrelationships of film and culture in a defined historical period, problems in film historiography, the impact of technology, and the growth of the industry.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FLM 353 - Film Criticism


    An analysis of major critical and theoretical approaches to cinema studies. Students will write reviews and analyses of contemporary and classic films.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FLM 354 - Contemporary Cinema


    A survey of recent films from several cultures. Students will consider what the movies of our time tell us about our world, how filmmaking and film viewing have changed in recent years, and how the movies of different cultures influence each other.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FLM 355 - Independent Cinema


    Though we tend to associate American movies with Hollywood, the history of our national cinema has been significantly shaped by filmmakers working outside, or at the margins of the Hollywood system. This course will consider films by artists working in the significant modes of independent cinema (features, experimental, documentary) and trace the history and influence of American independents to the present, while speculating upon their future in an age of cheap, plentiful film technology.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FLM 360 - Major Filmmakers


    An analysis of the style, concepts and narrative design in key works of two or three selected major filmmakers, such as Bergman, Bunuel, Eisenstein, Keaton, Lang, Fellini, Chaplin, Griffith, Hitchcock, and Kurosawa.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FLM 362 - International Film


    A survey of international films stressing their unique national characters, as well as comparative trends, themes and techniques.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FLM 364 - Film Genres


    Concepts of genre are examined in light of selected popular categories such as the western, the horror film, the crime film, and the musical. The relationship between the recurring structural elements of a genre and individual artistic expression will be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FLM 369 - Special Themes and Topics in Film Studies


    An intensive study of a significant theme or topic not covered in great depth by other film courses. Offerings may include such content as “Themes in American Film Culture,” “Film and Literature,” “Racial and Ethnic Identities in American Cinema,” “The Art of the Documentary,” “Women and Film,” and “The Cinema of War and Peace.” This course may be taken a second time with the permission of the department chair.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FLM 450 - Script Writing


    An introduction to screenplay theory and its practical application in the writing of film and TV scripts; students will develop a 30-minute screenplay from outline proposal to treatment to finished script.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    WST 384 - Images of Women in Modern American Literature


    This course provides an intensive study of the presentation of women in the works of major American writers from the turn of the century to the present.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives. Offered in Alternate Years

Entreprenuership

  
  •  

    ENT 110 - Creativity for Innovation


    Creative confidence is the foundation of innovation. Building creative confidence requires developing a creative practice. Throughout this intensive week you will become aware of your own creative capacities through interactive group activities that will exercise your creative muscles, grow your imagination, and help you shape your own creative practice. A multidisciplinary approach to creativity will be introduced and utilized to draw out your inner creative and build your creative momentum. Some creative techniques include visual art and creative writing for storytelling, movement and theatre, music and sound, and Futures Thinking. At the end of the week you will walk away with a creative toolbox and new perspectives that will broaden your ability to innovate and get your ideas out of your head and into action.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Course is only for pre-college students.
  
  •  

    ENT 111 - Design Thinking for Entrepreneurship


    Design Thinking is a solutions based problem-solving methodology. However, human-centered in its approach to developing solutions, it is more than a methodology, it is a mindset. Design thinking can be applied to almost anything, but in this week-long intensive we will focus on applying it to entrepreneurship and business innovation. Through interactive team activities and projects you will be introduced to the Design Thinking process, and learn to apply it so that you can turn your own observations into insights, and your insights into solutions. While putting into practice the design thinking techniques for observation, ideation, prototyping, and testing, individuals will also grow their skills in co-creation, collaboration, and shared leadership. At the end of the week you will share your ideas and present your solutions using storytelling methods.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Course is only for pre-college students.
  
  •  

    ENT 200 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship & Innovation: Practice & Mindset


    This introductory course engages students in the practice of entrepreneurship and the development of an entrepreneurial mindset. The course starts out with an exploration of who students are as entrepreneurial and innovative individuals, and to explore the contexts in which they plan to live and work in. By bringing together personal goals and aspirations, and linking them to professional areas of interest, the course will guide students towards the identification of entrepreneurial opportunities. Also, through engaging in a series of ideation, design thinking and business modeling exercises, students will develop innovative solutions (products or services) in an area of their interest. The course will be highly interactive, collaborative and experiential in nature, and will conclude with a “demo day” where all student teams will present their entrepreneurial innovations to one another.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Core Course
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in the Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    ENT 301 - Introduction to Ideation and Design Thinking


    The purpose of this course is to explore the nature of innovation and the process of idea creation. Students will engage in hands-on exercises that begin with brainstorming and refining ideas, and lead to the design and prototyping of solutions, concepts, and products. The course explores ideation, innovation, and entrepreneurship in different settings - social, arts, STEM, business, etc. The course is highly interactive and hands-on: Active student participation in all in-class and outside activities is expected.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENT 200  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in the Fall
  
  •  

    ENT 302 - Introduction to Business Modeling


    This course guides the student through the modeling process from ideation to a workable, applicable business model. Students are also exposed to the application of business model development to problem-solving, non-profit organizations and other entities not often associated with business. This class relies heavily on class participation and group work. Assignments are completed and presented as a group activity in addition to class evaluation of peers.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: ENT 200  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ENT 303 - Social Entrepreneurship, Civic Engagement & Community Development


    Social entrepreneurship involves using business to address social problems. This course explores theory, practice, and policy regarding social entrepreneurship. In doing so, it aims to foster conceptual and experiential knowledge about its use as a community development strategy. This course teaches students using engaged civic learning. Engaged civic learning is a high-impact educational practice that reinforces and refines the theories, models, and methods that students learn in the classroom through real-world, hands-on experiences with local non-profit organizations and other community partners.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENT 200  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    ENT 304 - Pop-up Social Enterprise


    In this class students develop a social business that they run on campus for four weeks using the for-profit to nonprofit social enterprise organizational model. Students will learn key elements of the business planning process as well as be introduced to critical skills such as financial management, marketing, and human resource management. The connections between entrepreneurship, social welfare and responsibility, and community development will be explored as we learn the important role that social entrepreneurs can play in promoting a healthy and vibrant community. Lectures, class discussions, assignments, and guest speaker lectures will engage students in exploring social entrepreneurship from a variety of angles.

    Applying theory to practice is the heart of this course. Using a unique hands-on learning approach, students will apply their classroom learning to the challenge of creating and operating their own business through the entrepreneurial venture, Pop-Up Enterprise. Each student will participate in a team to discover the rewards and challenges of entrepreneurship-the proceeds of which will benefit local community organizations in Westchester.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
     

  
  •  

    ENT 305 - Intellectual Property in Entrepreneurship and Innovation


    This course will explore how intellectual property law manifests itself in entrepreneurship and influences innovation.  Students will come to appreciate how decisions about patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets can advance strategic business goals.  To gain this understanding, we will survey key statutes, cases, and sources to understand key intellectual property regimes.  This course will be heavily participatory.  Early in the course, students will select a target publicly traded company in a sector of interest, which will provide concrete examples for the class to collaboratively analyze.  Each student will create and present an IP due diligence report that evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of their target company’s IP portfolio as well as provide recommendations for the future.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
  
  •  

    ENT 306 - Technology and Innovation


    New technologies provide significant opportunities for entrepreneurship. This course provides an overview of the core tenets of innovation, its history, theories, and future developments. Students will explore the topic of innovation by analyzing a series of existing and emerging technologies based on industry reports, case studies, guest speakers, and independent research. The class concludes with a design project where students identify innovative technology solutions that could solve a problem in the world (e.g. business, social, environment, government, transportation).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
    This course will not be offered during this academic year.
  
  •  

    ENT 307 - Entrepreneurship and the Law


    This course is designed to discuss with students the legalities and hurdles involved with becoming an entrepreneur. It is an introduction for the student to relevant topics, such as present employment obligations, intellectual property rights, types of business entities available to the entrepreneur, types of employees, contract obligations, as well as bankruptcy.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    ENT 308 - How to Master Your Pitch and Other High Stakes Presentations


    A course in advanced presentation skills for aspiring entrepreneurs. Areas of study include curation of content, audience analysis, message selection and delivery, media outreach, and using presentation technology individually and in teams.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    ENT 309 - The Art of Curating


    Combining a knowledge of art history, creative vision and business acumen, this course explores the fundamental skills required to organize and curate art exhibitions. The art curator must understand historical context, conceptualize a theme, consider the most aesthetical and practical installation, rely on teamwork and adhere to a sound business model, thus it is essential for students to learn about each facet of the curated exhibition. Museum and gallery visits, meetings with directors and curators and class lectures provide students with the knowledge to propose and curate their own art exhibitions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ENT 310 - Real Estate and Entrepreneurial Strategies


    The course covers a broad range of Real Estate concepts such as the Real estate basics, Legal foundation, Mortgage, risk, valuation, and diversification, and provides a detailed introduction to the factors in real estate markets. Activities center on strategies to invest in Real Estate Market.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Spring
  
  •  

    ENT 350 - Using Entrepreneurship for Community Economic Development in Jamaica


    This course aims to teach students about the diversity and complexity of issues facing developing countries, particularly Jamaica, and how entrepreneurship that focuses on fostering community development may be able to alleviate them. Throughout the semester, students will learn how to use research to identify community needs and will engage with entrepreneurs to learn how their activities influence the alleviation or proliferation of these community needs. During spring break, students will visit various formal and informal businesses, banks, and governmental organizations in Jamaica and talk with locals to understand the different roles (e.g. wealth vs. sustenance) of entrepreneurship on the island. Students in this class will gain an increased level of cultural competence, business consulting and research experience, and learn how to work with a variety of organizations to address community needs from different perspectives.
    Lecture/Service Learning
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ENT 200  
    Not Liberal Arts
    This course will not be offered during this academic year.
  
  •  

    ENT 398 - Special Topics In Entrepreneurship And Innovation


    This course will offer students the opportunity to study in an area of specialization in entrepreneurship & innovation that is not covered by existing courses. The specific topic will be listed when the course is offered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered as needed
  
  •  

    ENT 399 - Special Topics In Entrepreneurship And Innovation


    This course will offer students the opportunity to study in an area of specialization in entrepreneurship & innovation that is not covered by existing courses. The specific topic will be listed when the course is offered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered as needed
  
  •  

    ENT 401 - Entrepreneurial Internship


    Students carry out a work project in a start-up or small private or public sector organization under the direct supervision of an on-site executive entrepreneur/supervisor and a designated faculty advisor.  Students meet with faculty member to discuss findings and problems, and provide periodic reports. Students must have senior status or be rising seniors (in the summer before their senior year) and have good academic standing.  Permission to enroll is required (by application, including a faculty recommendation).  They will also be required to complete a tutorial on the prevention and identification of sexual misconduct by employers.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Pre-requisites: ENT 301  & ENT 302  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Permission to enroll is required (by application, including a faculty recommendation).
  
  •  

    ENT 402 - Entrepreneurship in Practice


    This course is designed to facilitate the process of developing an entrepreneurial venture, from idea to launch, with the help and support of Iona’s GaelVentures incubator. Students sign-up for this course with an existing idea that they would like to work on. Based on this idea, students will be assigned dedicated work hours at GaelVentures. During these hours, students will work on the development and launch of their venture with the support of the instructor, incubator manager, coaches and mentors. In addition, students will be meeting once per week as a group to reflect about their progress, set goals and discuss required resources to help launch their businesses.
    Lab
    Credits: 3
    Pre-requisites: ENT 301  & ENT 302 . Students are required to apply to the course with an existing entrepreneurial idea
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in Fall & Spring

Finance

  
  •  

    BUS 210 - Statistics


    An introduction to the method and techniques of statistical inference, including sampling distribution, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, simple and multiple regression, and index numbers.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 134  or equivalent
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    BUS 230 - Principles of Finance


    The course covers the basic principles of finance such as the time value of money, return, risk, valuation, and diversification, and provides a detailed introduction to the factors in financial decision making, financial services institutions, financial assets, the structure and operation of financial markets, the valuation of financial assets, and key financial management functions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 201 , MTH 134  or equivalent, or approval of Department Chair. Sophomore standing required.
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    FIN 322 - Corporate Finance


    A comprehensive study of the major issues involved in corporate financial management from the viewpoint of the firm’s chief financial officer. Topics covered include the fundamental concepts of risk, return and value; financial analysis and forecasting; working capital management; capital budgeting; long-term financing decisions; cost of capital; capital structure; and dividend policy.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210  & BUS 230 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
 

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