2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Jun 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

Nursing

  
  •  

    NUR 3160 - Nursing Care of the Adult and Aging Patient


    This course provides students with the information, knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide safe, high quality care to adults from early adulthood through the aging process. Acute and chronic health issues, adult development, primary, secondary and tertiary prevention will be addressed. Issues of diversity and inclusivity will be explored within the context of the delivery of nursing care.  Concepts of patient advocacy will be discussed with application of these concepts to direct patient care. This course includes both didactic/theorectical learning as well as exposure to adult patients in a variety of clinical settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 8
    Prerequisites: NUR 3010  and NUR 3200  
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    NUR 3200 - Patient Centered Nursing Care


    This course provides nursing students with critical thinking skills necessary to begin engaging in the nursing process to safely assess patient needs and identify quality interventions to meet those needs. The nursing process as the critical thinking model of nursing care will be presented and applied to actions basic to nursing care, the promotion of healthy physiologic and psychosocial responses to actual and potential health issues. This course includes a laboratory component.  Students will be expected to participate in both clinical laboratory and clinical patient settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 8
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: NUR 3010  
    Offered in the Fall Semester.
  
  •  

    NUR 4010 - Care of Individuals and Populations with Behavioral/Mental Health


    This course investigates the role of the nurse in the application of nursing process to individuals and groups with behavioral and mental health disorders. Prevention, assessment and nursing treatment of individuals and groups with behavioral and mental health disorders will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on assisting individuals, families and communities with the promotion, restoration, maintenance of health and the evaluation of nursing care in those situations. This course includes both didactic/theoretical learning as well as exposure to adult patients in a variety of in-patient and out-patient behavioral health clinical settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisite: NUR 3010  
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters. Offered in the Summer.
  
  •  

    NUR 4020 - Population Health: Nursing Care in the Community


    This course investigates the role of the nurse in the application of nursing process to groups of individuals or to communities with similar health needs and problems.  This course will focus on the needs of communities and groups of individuals within communities in need of mental health prevention care as well as acute and chronic mental health needs. Emphasis is placed on assisting individuals, families and communities with the promotion, restoration, maintenance of health and the evaluation of nursing care in those situations. This course includes both didactic/theoretical learning as well as exposure to adult patients in a variety of clinical settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisite: NUR 3010  
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters. Offered in the Summer.
  
  •  

    NUR 4100 - Nursing Care of Women and the Childbearing Family


    This course focuses in the information, knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide safe, high qualtiy care to women and the childbearing family. Acute and chronic health issues experienced by women, their partners and children, including issues of diversity and inclusivity will be explored within the context of the delivery of nursing care. Concepts of patient advocacy will be discussed with application of these concepts to direct patient care. This course includes both didactic/theorectical learning as well as exposure to adult patients in a variety of clinical settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisite: NUR 3010  
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters. Offered in the Summer.
  
  •  

    NUR 4110 - Nursing Care of Children


    This course focuses in the information, knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide safe, high quality care to children and the childbearing family. Acute and chronic health issues, child and family development, primary, secondary and tertiary prevention will be addressed. Issues of diversity and inclusivity will be explored within the context of the delivery of nursing care. Concepts of patient advocacy will be discussed with application of these concepts to direct patient care. This course includes both didactic/theorectical learning as well as exposure to adult patients in a variety of clinical settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisite: NUR 3010  
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters. Offered in the Summer.
  
  •  

    NUR 4200 - Research, Evidence, and Innovation


    This course will introduce concepts and processes required for the comprehension of research. The role of research in nursing will be addressed.  Multiple methods upon which to base best practices in nursing and data gathering for quality improvement will be introduced. Processes involved in asking clinical questions, searching databases, retrieving and appraising literature and critiquing research  and evidence based decisions will be discussed. The philosophy of human-centered design will be investigated as a problem solving strategy for nursing and health care.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 4300 - Leadership Development in Transitions to Professional Nursing


    This capstone course is designed to integrate didactic and clinical work to day and to explore fundamental issues in leadership and the application of leadership theory to clinical nursing. The framework within which these issues will be explored is the Center for Creative Leadership’s (CCL) approach to leadership development that probs leadership of self in the context of self awareness, leadership of groups and leadership of systems. Concepts of leadership will be explored in the context of history, current events in health care and exploration of future possibilities for the profession of nursing. Students will apply and reflect upon clinical and leadership.  Students will complete a 45 hour Leadership Workshop and Seminar and a 3 week precepted clinical experience.
    Lecture
    Credits: 6
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    NUR 4890 - Special Topics in Nursing


    This course will study various topics in current nursing practices. May include readings, lectures, seminars or labs.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2-8
    Offered When Needed

Peace and Justice

  
  •  

    PJS 420 - Special Topics in Peace and Justice Studies


    Topics dealing with current issues in Peace and Justice.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3

Philosophy

  
  •  

    PHL 110 - Introduction to Philosophy


    In this course, we will be examining some of the major themes and problems of Western philosophy as exemplified by a number of writings of some of the major figures of Western philosophy. We will be focusing on five areas: logic, philosophy of religion, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of mind. In each case we will be looking at a number of articles that take some conflicting positions on the questions being addressed. Part of your responsibility in reading these will be not only to concentrate on understanding what is being said, but also to think critically about the issues under discussion. In this course, being able to think critically about these issues is more important than simply memorizing what is being said. We will work on all this in class.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    PHL 210 - Action & Character: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy


    This course examines central themes in moral philosophy through a consideration of fundamental questions about human nature, action, and character. In what sense is moral philosophy a normative discipline? Are human beings selfish by nature? Should we always act exclusively in our own interest? Is morality relative (to culture, to individuals) or are there universal and objectively valid moral principles? Are moral judgments cognitively meaningful or simply expressions of attitude or emotion? What role does reason play in making moral judgments? Are there such things as moral facts and properties; can we ever really know such facts? What is valuable or good for us? What determines whether an action is right or wrong, obligatory or permissible? Are actions right or wrong in terms of their consequences? What do motives or intentions have to do with the morality of an action? Is morality fundamentally about performing certain kinds of actions or more about being a certain kind of person? What is the relationship between action and character? Such questions are considered in light o leading theories in moral philosophy, e.g., egoism, relativism, utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics. We will also apply these theories to specific moral problems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    PHL 215 - Matters of Life and Death


    This course examines some of the major themes and problems of moral philosophy with special emphasis on matters of life and death.  The nature of moral reasoning, virtue ethics, utilitarianism, and deontology as they have been displayed in some of the most important texts of the moral tradition will be studied and applied to contemporary problems in the areas of bioethics and mortality.  Examples of such problems are the moral status of abortion, euthanasia, genetic modification, capital punishment, torture, terrorism, and war.  The course also considers the question of what makes a life good and meaningful as well as the proper attitude towards the inevitability of death.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PHL 216 - Freedom and Morality


    This course examines the relationship between morality and various accounts of freedom, most notably freedom of the will.  The question of free will and the major positions in the free will debate are considered in light of the nature of moral reasoning, virtue ethics, utilitarianism, and deontology as they have been displayed in some of the most important texts of the moral tradition.  Particular emphasis is placed on the nature of the relationship between freedom and moral responsibility.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PHL 217 - Morality and Skepticism


    This course studies various skeptical challenges to morality.  The course examines the nature of moral reasoning, virtue ethics, utilitarianism, and deontology as they have been displayed in some of the most important texts of the moral tradition with special emphasis placed on a variety of skeptical positions with respect to morality; most notably that morality is not distinct from enlightened self-interest, religios commands, cultural mores, or personal preferences.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PHL 218 - Markets and Morals


    This course is designed to provide an introduction to several key concepts in moral philosophy as it relates to business and markets.  What is the relationship between business and ethics?  Do we have obligations to others in our role as employees or consumers?  Do corporations have moral agency?  Which economic systems are just?  Such questions are considered in terms of the moral concepts in virtue ethics, utilitarianism, deontology, and social contract theory.  Through evaluation of those concepts, including agency, integrity, self-interest, and obligation, special emphasis will be placed on our role and responsibilities within a global economy.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PHL 219 - Ethics and Entrepreneurial Leadership


    When you think of a good leader, what do you imagine? Can you imagine yourself stepping into that vision and owning it? All of us will encounter times in our life when we need to take on leadership roles, whether as the official lead on a project, as the default “decider” in a group of friends, or simply as the director of our own most important decisions in life. In this class, you will learn to refine and perhaps to alter your vision of ethical leadership, shaping it into something you yourself can strive for as you pursue your own entrepreneurial goals, and you will take concrete steps to bring yourself closer to that goal.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    PHL 221 - Nursing Ethics


    Increased autonomy in the nursing profession comes with increased responsibility, particularly ethical responsibility. This course provides both the student and practicing nurse with a foundational knowledge of ethics, ethical reasoning, and decision-making strategies to navigate the difficult ethical situations encountered on a daily basis. Decision-making models, rationales for decisions, and various topics about ethical patient care are provided in this course, satisfying the competencies needed for successful professional practice.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offerred in Fall and Spring
     
  
  •  

    PHL 301 - Environmental Ethics


    This course is an examination of some of the fundamental ethical issues and questions concerning our relation to and actions toward the environment.  This will also lead to an examination of some of the wider social and political issues concerning the environment.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHL 304 - Philosophy of Childhood


    To be human is to be educated according to the beliefs and practices of a particular place and time, and our understanding of ourselves as human beings and our place in the universe is predicated upon our introduction to it through the world we inhabit as children. The aim of this course is to consider philosophical perspectives on childhood insofar as they offer insight into the human condition of belatedness to the social order that gives our lives meaning.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    ICT Core Theme Centerpiece: Identity
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    PHL 305 - Philosophy of Sport


    This course addresses questions and issues that comprise the field known as the philosophy of sport, including the areas of ethics and social philosophy. What is sportsmanship and what is fair competition? Is it ever ethical to use performance-enhancing drugs? Should there be gender equity in sports participation? Does winning justify any means necessary to achieve it? These are but a few of the questions that will be addressed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHL 307 - Major Representatives of Ancient Philosophy


    A historical study of philosophy in the ancient world. Examination of the principal philosophical texts and doctrines of one or more of the following: ancient Eastern thought; pre-Socratic Greek philosophy; the Sophists and Socrates; Plato; Aristotle; post-Aristotelian Greek and Roman philosophy; Neoplatonism.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 308 - Major Representatives of Medieval Philosophy


    A study in-depth of one of the following: Augustine; Aquinas; Bonaventure; Duns Scotus; medieval Islamic philosophy or medieval Jewish philosophy.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 309 - Major Representatives of Modern Philosophy


    The origins of modern philosophy in terms of the most important ideas of the rationalist and empiricist traditions and the major movements of modernity will be examined.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 312 - Major Representatives of Contemporary Philosophy


    An examination of the new foundations of philosophical thought claimed by phenomenology, existentialism, and analytic philosophy will be undertaken.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 314 - Major Representatives of American Philosophy


    The development of the central themes of American Philosophy as found in one or more of the following: Peirce; Royce, James; Dewey; Whitehead; Quine; Rorty.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 319 - Philosophy of Reality


    An analysis of central metaphysical terms and concepts: ‘being;’ ‘reality;’ ‘existence.’ A detailed study of significant metaphysical problems: universals and essence; process and substance-attribute, relations; necessity and contingency; God.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 320 - Philosophy of Knowledge


    This course examines the nature, origins and limits of human knowledge. Dominant themes in epistemology, such as the claims of perceptual and a priori knowledge, the question of truth and justification, and the issue of skepticism, will be explored through a careful reading of classical and contemporary texts.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    ICT Core Theme Centerpiece: Innovation. Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    PHL 321 - Philosophy of Mind


    A review of recent criticisms and developments of the Cartesian Theory of mind and self-consciousness in the light of contemporary theories of language and behavior. Topics include minds and machines, intentions and mental states, materialism and the mind-body problem.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    PHL 323 - Animal Rights and Its Critics


    Do animals have rights? Why do we grant some animals rights but not others? In this course we will examine various arguments concerning animal rights. In the first half of the semester we will read some early animal rights/liberation arguments that are now considered classic, whereas in the second half of the semester we will turn to critics of animal rights. Topics of discussion will include, but are not limited to, authority, body, death, experimentation, factory farming, food, hunting, justice, kinship, language, personhood, pet, philosophy, power, speciesism, vegetarianism, and zoos.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: One philosophy core course.
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    PHL 327 - Moral Problems


    A study of individual and social moral questions. Religion; the nature of the right-to-life in relation to self-defense; euthanasia; abortion and medical ethics; sexual morality in relation to spousal and parental relationships; property rights in relation to theories of collectivism and private ownership (wage contract and the morality of strikes); Political rights (ground and limits of political authority); the doctrine of the just war and its applicability to nuclear armaments; international moral law.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 332 - Logic: Basis of Correct Reasoning


    A study of the logical principles of argument and a consideration of numerous common fallacies; an examination of the basic principles of deductive symbolic logic and of the inductive logic and design of research.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 337 - Philosophy and Culture


    This course seeks to explore philosophical conceptions of the unity and development of reason as it is reflected in man’s most distinctive cultural activities: art; religion; science and morality. The emphasis will center on how certain modern and contemporary philosophers have sought to relate forms of knowledge to various forms of man’s cultural and social activity.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 346 - Philosophy of Religion


    This course will locate the philosophical issues raised by religious belief in a personal, historical and cultural context. Present day possibilities for belief and unbelief will be analyzed and evaluated as an experiential option and not as an abstract subject. Authors who share this approach, such as Sigmund Freud and William James, will figure prominently in readings and discussions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHL 354 - Feminist Philosophy


    This course surveys a broad range of concepts, themes, and debates central to feminist philosophy. We will discuss issues of identity: What does it mean to be a feminist? What does it mean to be a woman? Why do we have different - and at times competing - notions of feminism? We will also explore how our identities are shaped by other social constructions such as race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation. Our engagement with seminal feminist texts will help us reexamine social practices and reconstruct moral theories through feminist lenses.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: One Philosophy Core Course
    ICT Core Theme Centerpiece: Feminist. Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    PHL 355 - Thomas Paine and the Revolutionary Tradition


    Beginning with a study of the philosophical foundations of The Declaration of Independence, this course will examine the relation of Thomas Paine to the revolutionary traditions of the 18th Century. The course will end with an examination of the relevance of Paine’s thought to the contemporary world
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    PHL 356 - Social and Political Philosophy


    This course will seek to explore the philosophical foundations of ideas like rights, justice, freedom and obligation in political and social contexts. The emphasis will be on the conceptual problems associated with attempts to formulate arguments and theories about these topics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    PHL 360 - Ethics and Business


    This course seeks to develop a moral perspective that is applicable to the structure and practices of business. Themes to be discussed are: a normative theory of ethics; economic justice; corporate-labor responsibility with respect to wage and price, investment, advertising, preferential hiring, ecology, and consumer protection; and the new functions and responsibilities of multinational corporations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 361 - Ethical Issues in Science and Technology


    This course seeks to develop a moral perspective through philosophy as it applies to the practical and ethical problems that emerge from contemporary technologies. Emphasis will be placed on ethical problems that professionals face in the field, such as privacy in data technologies, intellectual property rights, environmental ethics, ethical issues in engineering and the physical sciences. The goal of the course will be to clarify the issues involved and to help students develop tools of ethical analysis and evaluation to confront such issues.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHL 362 - Respect and Self-Respect


    In this class, students will begin by learning the paradigmatic Enlightenment understanding of self-respect found in the work of Immanuel Kant and then procede to learn important critiques of this theory and contemporary rethinkings of self-respect. The class will focus especially on feminist and critical race texts by authors like Charles Mills, Robin S. Dillon, and Bernard Boxill. In the process, the class will also engage with contemporary issues that continue the fraught conversation about what self-respect really means, such as the self-care movement, respectability politics, and the body positivity movement.
    Lecture/Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters.
  
  •  

    PHL 363 - Philosophy of Psychology and Neuroscience


    In this course, we will investigate the following six scientific questions about how the mind and brain work. (1) Do brains work like computers? (2) Are thoughts really just neurons firing? (3) Can non-human animals think? (4) Are human beings really rational? (5) Does the mind extend beyond the boundaries of the brain? (6) What are brains for, anyway? Our goal in this class is to figure out what, in general, the sciences of mind and brain have to say about our six questions. These questions are broad enough that it is difficult to know which experimental results are most relevant to answering them. Our first task, therefore, will be to clarify the questions themselves so that we have a better grasp on what might count as a good answer. Once we’ve determined what scientific literature is most relevant to answering these questions, we’ll read a selection of it, outline two or three promising answers, and assess their strengths and weaknesses.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    PHL 365 - Philosophy of Science


    A survey of the development of the relations between the philosophical tradition and modern science. Special attention will be given to scientific revolutions in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the philosophical schools of thought during this same period.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    ICT Core Theme Centerpiece: Scientific Reasoning.
  
  •  

    PHL 366 - Problems in Medical Ethics


    This course will focus on the nature of medical ethics and on the ethical implications of current problems in medical practice and research.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 375 - Aesthetics


    A study of major theories of art and their relation to individual art forms, especially literature and music. Includes an examination of some central critical concepts, such as value, intention, expression, and insight, as well as the philosophical problems surrounding modern art.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHL 381 - Philosophy of Law


    An examination of some classical and contemporary attempts to define and/or explicate the concept of law, the nature of legal reasoning, and the relationships among legal systems and customs, traditions, and moral ideas. Attention directed to theories of natural law, legal positivism, legal realism, sociological jurisprudence. Consideration of problems involved in notions of international law, legal obligation, due process and the morality of the criminal law.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    PHL 383 - Philosophy of Human Nature


    What makes humans unique? Many branches of science have made progress on this question, but most of the answers are both partial and controversial. Our goal in this class will be to survey some of the most influential answers, evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, and fit them together into a coherent theoretical framework. We will have to synthesize information from a diverse range of sciences, including developmental psychology, behavior genetics, evolutionary biology, and cultural anthropology. In order to impose some structure on this vast collection of ideas, we will organize the course around the venerable nature/nurture debate. Those on the nature side defend the idea that human uniqueness results primarily from our genetic, biological heritage. They think we have complex culture because our biology makes us smart. Those on the nurture side say that cultural and environmental factors are more influential. They think that we are smart because we have complex culture. As we assess this fascinating and occasionally fierce controversy, your job will be to stay open-minded, and to learn as much as you can from both sides.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    PHL 400 - Independent Study


    A program of readings in an area of philosophical interest or a program of research leading to the writing of a major philosophical paper with the advisor’s approval, under the supervision of a member of the department.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Approval of Dept Advisor
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    PHL 401 - Special Topics in Philosophy


    Special topics courses are designed to offer the opportunity for investigation into the work of individual philosophers, historically important philosophical movements, or contemporary philosophical themes. Specific topics wll be indicated when these courses are offered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHL 402 - Special Topics in Philosophy


    Special topics courses are designed to offer the opportunity for intensive philosophical investigation into the work of individual philosophers, historically important philosophical movements, or contemporary philosophical themes. Specific topics will be indicated when these courses are offered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHL 410 - Special Topics in Philosophy


    Special topics courses are designed to offer the opportunity for investigation into the work of individual philosophers, historically important philosophical movements, or contemporary philosophical themes. Specific topics wll be indicated when these courses are offered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHL 420 - Capstone Seminar


    The seminar will focus on major philosophical works. Study of these works will enable students to perform two crucial integrative tasks - bringing together what was learned in the courses taken as a philosophy major and linking that with what was learned from the courses which constitute the liberal arts core curriculum.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing
    Capstone Course Open to Seniors Only Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required

Physics

  
  •  

    PHY 101 - General Physics I


    A general course in the fundamental phenomena of mechanics, heat, and sound.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Corequisite: MTH 231  
    Offered in Fall & Spring. Written Intensive
  
  •  

    PHY 102 - General Physics II


    A general course in the fundamental phenomena of electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: PHY 101  and MTH 231 .
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    PHY 103 - General Physics I Without Lab


    A general course in fundamental phenomena of mechanics, heat, and sound. Course construct is without a lab.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHY 104 - General Physics II Without Lab


    A general course in the fundamental phenomena of electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHY 105 - Earth Science


    A basic course involving the study of the earth, its structure and development. Phenomena such as earthquakes, mineral resources, storms, tides, continental drift and weather will be examined.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed. Written Intensive
  
  •  

    PHY 106 - General Astronomy


    A basic course applying physical principles to the study of general astronomy with an emphasis on the solar system.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed. Written Intensive
  
  •  

    PHY 110 - Physics of Sound


    The nature of sound and its physical properties will be examined. How those physical properties are perceived psychoacoustically through listening and the transfer of sound information through the auditory mechanism will be explored.  Sound waves, harmonics, resonance, and the recording of sound will be covered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters
  
  •  

    PHY 120 - Computer Music System


    A course designed to develop the foundation for literacy necessary to deal with science and technology through a study of computer music using the MIDI.  The course will employ the student’s understanding of science, technology, and systems to assess the societal impact of computer music along with its costs, benefits and detriments. Two lectures per week and two hours of laboratory per week. Not open to students who have taken STL 145.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Written Intensive. Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    PHY 300 - Mathematical Mechanics I


    A course in theoretical mechanics with an emphasis on mathematical model building using calculus. Introductory applications of vector analysis and ordinary differential equations in Newtonian mechanics will be studied to develop physical intuition and mathematical ability simultaneously.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Introductory Calculus and PHY 101  or permission of dept chair
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHY 301 - Mathematical Mechanics II


    A theoretical course in mechanics treating central forces; accelerated reference systems; generalized coordinates; Lagrange’s Equation; Hamilton’s Equations; small oscillations; normal coordinates; wave equation; rigid body motion in three dimensions; Euler’s Equations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: PHY 300 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    PHY 315 - Electricity and Magnetism I


    A study of electrostatics employing vector formalism; Gauss’ Law; Laplace’s Equation; dielectrics and polarization; direct current circuit analysis and measurements.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: PHY 101 , PHY 102 , MTH 302 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    PHY 316 - Electricity and Magnetism II


    A study of charged particles and conductors in magnetic fields; magnetism and magnetic materials; alternating current circuits, Maxwell’s Equations and electromagnetic waves.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: PHY 315 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    PHY 323 - Modern Physics I


    A treatment of atomic and nuclear physics in terms of the Schroedinger Theory. Topics include: relativity, thermal radiation and the origin of quantum theory; Bohr Theory, particles and waves; Schroedinger Equation and Solutions; one-electron atom, magnetic moments; spin; multi-electron atoms; x-rays; composition of nuclei, nuclear models, alpha, beta, gamma radiation, nuclear reactions, nuclear forces, and elementary particles.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: PHY 102 , MTH 302 

     
    Offered in Alternate Years

  
  •  

    PHY 324 - Modern Physics II


    A treatment of atomic and nuclear physics in terms of the Schroedinger Theory. Topics include: relativity, thermal radiation and the origin of quantum theory; Bohr Theory, particles and waves; Schroedinger Equation and Solutions; one-electron atom, magnetic moments; spin; multi-electron atoms; x-rays; composition of nuclei, nuclear models, alpha, beta, gamma radiation, nuclear reactions, nuclear forces, and elementary particles.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: PHY 102 , MTH 302 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    PHY 423 - Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics


    A consideration of the concepts of equilibrium thermodynamics, such as thermodynamic functions, equations of state, and the laws of thermodynamics. Attention is given to the statistical principles necessary to deal with physical systems containing large aggregates of particles: Maxwell-Boltzman; Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: PHY 300 , PHY 323 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    PHY 424 - Quantum Mechanics


    A treatment of the formal theory which embodies the present day physicist’s understanding of atomic and sub-atomic systems. The course deals mainly with the Schroedinger representation and emphasizes applications to atomic phenomena. The nature of Hilbert space, the role of operators in the theory of eigenvalue equations, and time-dependent perturbation theory are among the topics treated.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: PHY 323 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    PHY 430 - Internship in Physics


    Student participation in an off-campus, supervised work experience related to physics with regular reporting to an assigned faculty member. A written report relating this work experience to the student’s course of study will normally be expected.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Department Approval Required. Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    PHY 441 - Research I


    A course in which the student carries out a research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Open only to a limited number of selected students.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    PHY 442 - Research II


    A course in which the student carries out a research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Open only to a limited number of selected students.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    PHY 450 - Seminar


    A survey of selected topics designated to integrate the major coursework and to illustrate the use of current literature in research. Presentations by individual students. One period per week.
    Seminar
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: Senior status
    Capstone Course Open to Seniors Only Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    PHY 451 - Seminar in Science, Technology and Society


    A seminar experience for senior science majors which explores the interplay of science, technology and society. Students will present and discuss perspectives based on the humanities and social sciences in the context of selected science case studies and they will compose new case studies which illustrate human dimensions of the scientific endeavor. Required of all majors in senior year. This course and the 450 seminar course together satisfy the capstone graduation requirement.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Capstone Course Department Approval Required. Open to Seniors Only Offered in the Spring Semester

Political Science

Courses may be classified as follows:

Corequisites: POL 201 , POL 203  

Major Core: POL 302 , POL 497  

  1. Political Theory: POL 313 , POL 314 , POL 315 , POL 316 , POL 317  
  2. American Politics: POL 320, POL 323 , POL 324 , POL 325 , POL 326 , POL 327 , POL 328 , POL 329 , POL 332 , POL 333  
  3. Policy and Administration: POL 380 , POL 381 , POL 382 , POL 383  
  4. International Politics: POL 331 , POL 362 , POL 364 , POL 365 , POL 366 , POL 368  
  5. Comparative Politics: POL 341 , POL 346 , POL 347 , POL 348  
  6. Scope & Statistics: POL 301 , POL 305  
  7. Special Topics, Seminars, Internships, & Independent Studies: POL 336 , POL 385 , POL 483 , POL 484 , POL 491 , POL 492 , POL 499  

  
  •  

    CDS 1101 - Contemporary Political Issues


    This course traces the historical origin of contemporary “trouble spots” in the international community. The roots and present day implications of both Western and Non-Western political issues will be examined. (Ex. Poland, Ireland, El Salvador, Lebanon).
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
  •  

    CDS 1173 - Introduction to Law


    This course is designed to provide the undergraduate student with a realistic exposure to the study of law. Through the simulation of a typical first-year law school classroom situation and individual assignments, students will develop a fundamental understanding of legal reasoning, research and analysis. The major focus will be upon case law and statutory analysis, substantive law, legal research and writing. 1 credit, weekend intensive.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Weekend Intensive
  
  •  

    IDS 451 - Legislative Internship


    This program gives students firsthand knowledge of the legislative process. Interns perform research and administrative tasks important in the daily operation of a legislative office. Students approved by Iona’s campus liaison and accepted by the New York State Senate/Assembly or United States House of Representatives/United States Senate Intern Committee, or counterpart legislative internship liaison organization, spend thirty hours per week in a semester-long program and meet academic requirements established by Iona.
    Lecture
    Credits: 12
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    IST 300 - West and the Muslim World


    This course provides students with the opportunity to explore some aspects of the relationships between the West and the Muslim world, including political, religious, and cultural commonalities and differences. In addition to regular class meeting with the instructor, students will participate in a real time exchange with students from the Muslim world for a two hour period each week with their assigned Soliya group.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IST 403 - Internship for International Studies


    Students participate in a supervised off-campus work experience in an international corporation or organization in the United States or abroad, such as an airline, bank, airport, brokerage firm, travel agency, the United Nations, import-export company, multinational, the fashion or film industries, foreign consulate, chamber of commerce, etc. Students report regularly to the coordinator and submit materials to meet the academic requirements for the course.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior standing
    Open to Seniors Only. Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    IST 491 - Special Topics in International Studies


    This course examines some of the key problems, debates, and issues in global politics today. Emphasis will be placed on the role of national and international institutions, and non-governmental organizations in identifying and seeking to address global problems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    IST 497 - Capstone Seminar in International Studies


    As stated in the Iona College catalog, the goal of this course is to demonstrate through an independent senior thesis, class discussion, and oral presentations, the skills and knowledge the student has gained in the degree program.  To that end, the course will provide the opportunity for majors to critically review concepts theories, approaches, and the literature pertinent to the topic under review and to engage in independent, original, and rigorous research.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Oral Intensive.
    Written Intensive.
  
  •  

    POL 201 - American Government 1


    An introduction to the governmental process in the United States: Constitutional basis; federalism; civil rights; interest groups and party politics; organization of the federal government; dynamics of policy formulation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    POL 203 - Introduction to Global Politics


    Introduction to the study of politics and government. Emphasizes the study of political institutions, ideology, political culture, participation and party systems. Analyzes patterns of political change and global interactions with a reference to current issues.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    POL 301 - Scope and Approaches to the Study of Political Science


    An introduction to the variety of contemporary approaches to the study of politics and government. Students will become familiar with the analytical tools necessary for conducting research and writing organized papers. This course emphasizes a critical analysis of various methodologies.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    POL 302 - Research Methods in Political Science


    An introduction to political research methods. The course will make students better practitioners and consumers of political research. Focus is on basic qualitative and quantitative methods, with an emphasis on the stages in the research process and computerized data analysis. Among the topics covered: research design, strategies, ethics, conceptualization, measurement, sampling, causation, generalizability, reliability, methods (surveys, observation/participation, evaluation…), elementary and advanced data analysis, reviewing, proposing, and reporting research. Particular attention is paid to computerized data analysis using the GSS and SPSS.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 305 - Social Statistics


    An introduction to statistics commonly used by political and social scientists. Focus is on the use of basic statistics prevalent in the political and social science literature, as well as statistics that students will use in their research. Among the topics covered are descriptive statistics, such as measures of central tendency, variability, graphics, bivariate analysis, cross-tabulation, regression, and inferential statistics, such as normal distribution, sampling, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square and ANOVA. The course also emphasizes computerized data analysis using GSS and SPSS.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 313 - Revolution in Theory and Practice


    An examination of some of the major theories that have been put forward to define and explain the nature of revolution. Attention will be focused on the causes of revolution, the role of revolutionary leaders and the organization of revolutionary movements. Specific historical cases of revolution will be studied and certain contemporary revolutionary movements analyzed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 314 - American Political Thought


    This course is an introduction to many of the major thinkers, traditions and themes in the history of American political thought. The course explores the degree to which these thinkers and intellectual traditions influenced the development of American political institutions. Special attention is paid to thinkers who were also political actors, including the Founders and Lincoln. Intellectuals and philosophers such as Emerson, Melville, Veblen, James, Du Bois, Dewey and Rorty are also covered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 315 - Great Political Thinkers


    This course offers a survey of Western political thought from the Classical Greeks to the present. The course emphasizes the perennial problems of politics: the nature of man, the nature of the political relationship, the meaning of freedom, authority, political obligation, power, justice, citizenship, etc.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 316 - Inequality and American Democracy


    This course explores the causes and effects of socio-economic inequality in the United States. The course focuses particularly on the effects of inequality on our democratic institutions and on the major political theorists who have contributed useful insights to the inequality debate, including John Rawls and Michael Walzer. Careful attention is paid to theories of democracy and to the social and economic conditions that can undermine popular sovereignty.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 317 - The Politics of Evil


    This course is an exploration of the origins, nature, and meaning of evil in a political context. It will examine instances of political evil, particularly those committed in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, through a theoretical lens. Students will read seminal philosophers and theologians who have shed light on this topic, including Augustine, Machiavelli, Nietzsche, Freud, Niebuhr, Morgenthau, Buber, and Arendt. The course will also explore the implications of the debate about evil between social and evolutionary psychologists. A particular focus will be given to totalitarianism, a manifestation of political evil that has assumed many forms since the early twentieth century. Other themes may include colonialism, genocide, terrorism, and war.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 319 - Thomas Paine and the Struggle for Democracy


    The structure of the course will explore the main features of Paine’s political philosophy, their origins, achievements and impact. Paine’s philosophy is rooted in axioms based on common sense - equality (the source of natural rights), materialism (the world is knowable and objective), human progress (“no one should live in a state worse than before civilization”), and the inherent goodness and collectivist nature of mankind. Based upon these axioms, Paine erected a four-fold paradigm of democracy: social and economic justice, evolving democratic structures and the nature of constitutions, free thought, and mass participation (right of revolution). Each will be examined historically as Paine’s life and writings are played out against the backdrop of the rise of the age of the democratic revolutions. Attention will be paid to how Paine advanced these ideas, and the seminal revolutionary nature of his philosophy.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 323 - Civil Liberties and the Bill of Rights


    A study of current American conceptions of civil liberties, including the judicial policy-making role of the Federal Courts in developing modern constitutional doctrines concerning the Bill of Rights, the 14th Amendment and important recent civil rights legislation. The course concentrates on these topics: freedom of speech, press and assembly; racial and ethnic equality; women’s rights; criminal justice and police procedures; obscenity and pornography; rights to privacy and freedom of personal lifestyle; voters’ rights and political equality; and such new constitutional frontiers as abortion, gun control, gay liberation and capital punishment.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 324 - The American Political System: The Presidency


    A survey of the constitutional basis and historical evolution of presidential powers; the rise of the administrative state and executive-centered government in modern American history; and the institutional and political resources of influence of the Office of the President, especially in foreign affairs. Theories are applied to recent presidential case histories and case studies of presidents who changed the contours of the executive office.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    POL 325 - State and Local Government


    An analysis of factors influencing state and local governments as political systems through an examination of intergovernmental relations; the interdependent roles of governors, legislatures, and courts in policy-making and implementation; the organization, functions, and jurisdiction of local governments; and the interaction of political parties and interest groups with formal governmental institutions and processes. The course highlights socioeconomic and political trends leading to change in state and local governments, with an emphasis on state and local governments in New York State.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 326 - Politics and Criminal Justice


    An introduction to the politics of the American criminal justice system from crime and arrest to parole and probation. Attention will be given to the processes of defining crime, its causes and remedies. The course will deal with contemporary problems of police, courts and penal systems in American society, as well as recent constitutional decisions in criminal justice.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 327 - Politics and Media


    An analysis of the relationship between government and various forms of media-broadcast (television and radio), print (newspapers, magazines), and the internet; the influence of television on elections, campaign spending, public opinion formation; limits on the First Amendment in times of crisis, and government censorship of news reporting in times of war. The course includes benchmark Supreme Court cases defining the limits and extent of freedom of the press and the role of the Federal Communications Commission in defining the bounds of medial industry action.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    POL 328 - The American Political System: Judicial Branch and the Constitution


    The purpose of the course is to expose students to a wide range of materials concerning the judicial process, including aspects of court structure and rules of court operation as well as to provide a detailed study of constitutional law through US Supreme Court decisions. The consistent themes explored in this course focus on the politics of the judicial branch, including the policy-making role of the courts, and the dynamics of the US Constitution. Supreme Court cases will cover such topics as judicial review, federalism, the commerce power, separation of powers, and substantive due process.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    POL 329 - Political Parties, Campaigns and Elections


    Examination of the history, role and function of political parties in American elections and the governing process. Study of why and how people participate in politics, voting patterns, voting rights, direct democracy lawmaking, campaign finance, interest group influence, media and public opinion influence in elections.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    POL 330 - Political and Social Risk


    Organizations of all sizes and types have been asking political and social scientists how best to understand, assess, analyze, measure, prepare for, and mitigate against risks of this - and many other kinds - for decades. With that as a backdrop, this course focuses on providing students with an introduction to the study of political risk, both historically and currently: what is it, how is it best understood, analyzed, assessed, and mitigated. To this end we use real-world crisis scenarios to examine risk as it impacts organizations of various sizes across diverse regions, markets, and time frames. It is designed to give students the skills they need if they are interested in working in risk analysis and consulting - an area that is only growing as organizations continue to see firsthand the danger of not investing in this type of analysis.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Spring.
  
  •  

    POL 331 - American Foreign Policy


    An introduction to the basic structure, function and processes of American foreign policy. Examination of the role of the President, the intelligence community (CIA, FBI, NSA), Congress, and departments of Defense and State. The course examines constitutional sources of foreign policy powers and constraints on the Executive branch and Congress imposed by the public, media, interest groups and others. Students will gain a working knowledge of several key American foreign policy decisions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    POL 332 - Public Opinion and American Democracy


    This course examines and assesses the role of public opinion in American democracy. The course emphasizes both the normative and practical aspects of the study of opinion in the American political system. To this extent, it emphasizes both the theoretical aspects (opinion formation, role of opinion in campaigns, elections, policy-making, the current state of research, the history and development of opinion, etc.). In addition, the course focuses on the empirical aspects of opinion (how it is measured, practical aspects of conducting survey research, basics of computerized data analysis, etc.).
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
 

Page: 1 <- 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12