2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Sep 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

Media & Strategic Communication

  
  •  

    MSC 312 - Communication Graphics


    The creative use of typography, layout and design in print media, advertising, and public relations; background in the basic knowledge of various printing processes and computer graphics helpful.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 313 - Media Planning and Buying


    Attention is focused on creating and implementing effective media planning strategies. The various factors that influence the choice of and placement in advertising media are explored. Emphasis is placed on the rapidly changing media environment and the wide assortment of vehicles an advertiser has at its disposal.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 210  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 314 - Multimedia Communications


    An introduction to the basic concepts and practices of multimedia production, particularly emphasizing computer presentations for business and educational purposes. Students will develop original scripts into full multimedia projects utilizing graphics, animation, sound, and video.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 315 - History of Mass Communication


    The course explores the origin and development of mass communication from the invention of writing to the present. The social, economic and political implications of the innovations in technology and the nature of the media will be analyzed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 317 - Public Opinion Dynamics


    A study of the formation, nature and role of public opinion in a democratic society; investigation of how persuasion and propaganda effects are achieved via mass communication.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 319 - The Five-Minute Film: Creating a Short Movie in Fifteen Weeks


    An interdisciplinary course that teaches students how to create short fictional content. Students will leave the class with a professional-quality short film that they will have scripted, produced and edited, which will serve as a professional portfolio piece for those seeking work in the industry. 
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 321 - Trends in Advertising


    An exploration of the most recent advertising and marketing strategies and tactics that advertisers have used in adapting to a continuously and rapidly changing media environment. Emphasis is on case studies, learning new approaches to advertising, and applying some of these techniques through a team project. The specific content of the course will shift over time to reflect the latest developments in advertising.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 210  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 322 - Advertising Account Planning and Research


    An exploration and the application of various research techniques that are used to better understand consumers and generate successful advertising strategies. The history and function of account planning, as well as its relationship to this process are thoroughly examined. Both quantitative approaches, including surveys and experimental designs, and qualitative methods, including in-depth interviews and ethnographic procedures, are addressed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 210  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 323 - Digital Advertising


    A comprehensive overview of digital media and advertising, including emerging digital advertising formats and social media marketing tools. Students will learn to develop digital advertising strategies; target consumers; create persuasive social media marketing content; conceptualize, execute, and optimize digital campaigns; and apply metrics to track campaign effectiveness.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 305  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MSC 326 - Race, Gender & Class in Media


    This course critically examines the role of the media in constructions of race and gender in society. It analyzes race and gender issues related to media representations, media ownership and the media workface.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 327 - Digital Production: Studio and Field


    Techniques of television studio and field production from scripting to directing; topics of study include elements of various forms of writing for television; studio and field production; design; lighting; graphics; program planning in a workshop setting.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 225  
    Lab Hours Required
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 329 - Radio Production


    This course will offer an intensive study opportunity in all facets of radio production. Topics covered will include writing for broadcast radio, on-air speech methodology and technical radio production. Students will be required to exhibit their radio production skills by broadcasting live on the campus radio station.
    Practicum
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 225  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 330 - Broadcast Journalism


    The content, techniques, structure, impact, and limitations of electronic journalism; basic script models; the informative interview; news stories with actualities for radio and television; the planning of radio and television newscasts.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and either MSC 225  or MSC 275  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    MSC 335 - The Creative Process in Advertising


    An in-depth approach to developing creative advertising for various media. Focus is on the importance of creativity in advertising and the two main positions in an advertising agency creative department – the copywriter and art director. The thinking behind and practices associated with these central roles are covered. These practices are applied to the development of original, strategically-sound advertising campaigns.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  MSC 305  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 337 - On-Camera Presence, Voice and Diction


    An intensive study in on-camera demeanor, voice control and speaking styles. Students will master the craft of proper on-camera appearance and presentation, proper voice techniques and interview styles.
    Practicum
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 225  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 350 - Writing for the Screen


    This course is designed to give the beginning student an overview of screenwriting specifically for the television and video industries. Concepts to be introduced include: familiarity with various media formats, concept development, plot developments, writing treatments, scene construction, character development, idea generation, brainstorming and marketing. Students will study and apply the techniques, style and formats of treatment preparation and scriptwriting for various visual media formats including television, new media/internet and short films.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:MSC 225  
    Written Intensive
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 370 - Writing for Public Relations


    A public relations writing course for preparing, adapting and analyzing messages for print and electronic media, new media, and the Internet.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 213  
    Written Intensive
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 377 - Writing and Reporting for Multiplatform Journalism


    An intensive study of writing, news gathering and reporting for multiplatform journalism. Skills include the structure and style of news stores, and the development of reporting, research, sources and interpretive skills.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 275  
    Written Intensive
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    MSC 387 - Multiplatform Magazine Journalism


    A study of the principles and practices of magazine editing and publishing in a multiplatform environment. Includes study of the history and format of magazines, as well as the writing and reporting skills for this format.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 275  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 388 - Sports Journalism


    An advanced course in reporting and writing on sports for the print and broadcast media. Topics of study include coverage of sports events, interviews, profiles, columns, investigative stories, and analyses and commentaries.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 275  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 389 - Online Journalism


    This course familiarizes students with the use of online information sources in reporting and information gathering. Topics of study include the use of databases and the Internet for information gathering and computer-assisted reporting, critical evaluation of Internet content and the legal and ethical implications of online journalism.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200 , MSC 275  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    MSC 391 - Advanced Writing and Reporting for Sports Journalism


    An advanced course in reporting and writing on sports for the print and broadcast media. Topics of study include coverage of sports events, interviews, profiles, columns, investigative stories, analyses and commentaries.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 275 , MSC 377  and MSC 378  
  
  •  

    MSC 392 - Advanced Writing and Reporting for Public and Community Affairs


    This advanced reporting course prepares the journalism student for covering public affairs, including all branches of local, state and federal government, administrative agencies, as well as other specialized community affairs reporting beats, including business, education, health care and labor. Course offers practical experience in covering public meetings, elections, interpreting public documents and records, interviewing public officials and community leaders, and understanding relevant legal procedures.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: MSC 275 , MSC 377  and MSC 378  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 393 - Business and Financial Reporting and Writing


    This course teaches students how to understand what’s going on at companies big and small as well as Wall Street and to report and write stories about these businesses in a compelling way.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 275  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 394 - Advanced Reporting and Writing for Entertainment, Arts and Culture Journalism


    This advanced reporting course prepares the journalism student for covering entertainment, arts and culture, including motion pictures, television, book publishing, performing arts, art exhibitions, music concerts, drama and cultural events. Course offers practical experience in writing news stories and feature profiles involved in reporting events, covering press conferences, and interviewing key players in these fields. Emphasis on critical and persuasive writing about entertainment, arts and cultural media.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 275  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 395 - Writing and Visualizing Data for Journalism


    This class will prepare students to find, evaluate, process and report on different sources of data, both visually and through traditional writing, as well as to use data in audience engagement. Topics include working with data, basic statistical concepts, techniques to display reporting visually, ways of writing about data in informative and engaging ways, and using data to learn more about the audience.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 377  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MSC 397 - Research Methods In Media & Strategic Communication


    The course focuses on the theory and methodology of applied mass communication research. Topics include reviews of literature, interviews, case studies, surveys, historical analysis; content analyses and focus groups.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 399 - International Media & Communication


    A comparative study of the mass communication and media systems of nations under varying social, political and economic systems; their development, structure, function and current state; political and economic factors that influence them; factors that facilitate or restrict the flow of national and international communication in those countries.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 403 - Advertising Campaigns


    A presentation of the skills necessary to design, implement and manage advertising campaigns, with an emphasis on planning and decision making procedures applied to specific advertising problems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 305  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    MSC 405 - Skills of the Broadcast Multimedia Journalist


    The class introduces students to the skills required of television multimedia journalists – what used to be called TV news reporters – including live interviewing, editing audio and video, using social media, videography, on-screen skills, writing for broadcast and the internet.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 275  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MSC 410 - Public Relations Case Studies


    Case studies of typical public relations problems in industry, labor, education, government, social agencies and trade associations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 213  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 413 - Public Relations Campaigns and New Media


    Developing and implementing public relations campaigns; hands-on experience in designing and producing materials for campaigns; emphasis on use of planning and evaluation techniques.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and MSC 213  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 414 - Advanced Topics in Public Relations: Health Communication


    This course is a study of health communication including conceptual frameworks, processes and contexts.  Topics such as provider-patient relationships, health promotions and disease prevention will be explored.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    MSC 428 - Digital Production Workshop


    In a workshop environment, students will refine and expand their creative producing skill, technical production ability, and performing/hosting style. Students will explore various production formats including news, dramatic scenes, and music performance. Projects will culminate into a final comprehensive, multi-platform production package.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  MSC 327  
    Lab Hours Required
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 430 - The Producer’s Craft


    This course will focus on the role of the producer for screen-based media. Areas of study include concept research and development; project budgeting and finance; writing and pitching proposals; planning pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution. Emphasis is on the Producer’s ability to guide the concept and story development of television and film genres through leadership, vision and creative originality.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 327  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 431 - Television Aesthetics and Criticism


    This course will provide an introduction to the analysis of television modes, content and story design. Through lectures, readings and screenings, students will learn to examine and engage in television with a critical eye, and to deconstruct classic and contemporary television shows in order to recognize underlying paradigms, as well as the need for and impact of audience and advertiser appeal.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 327  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 432 - Broadcast Newsroom


    Broadcast Newsroom is an advanced course for the students that have achieved a mid-level success in editing (audio/video), writing and reporting. Assignments will include campus coverage of news and events, turning that footage into a reporter’s package for multi-media news platforms.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 327  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 435 - Sports Broadcasting and Production


    This course will involve the practical application of broadcast methodologies, specifically related to the coverage of live sporting events. Topics covered will include the sports interview, preparing a “stand-up” during/after a sporting event, writing and delivering sports recaps and more. Students will be required to provide live sports coverage during on-campus eevnts. Some time outside of class will be required.
    Practicum
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 327  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    MSC 447 - Advanced Television Production


    This course provides the study and working knowledge of advanced television studio production. Students will be taught more advanced varieties of television production and will apply that knowledge toward the actual production of programs.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 327  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    MSC 476 - Feature Writing


    Preparation of feature articles for the print media: discovering and researching ideas; techniques of writing various kinds of feature articles. emphasizing human interest factors and literary devices.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 275  
  
  •  

    MSC 478 - Copy Editing


    A detailed study of contemporary copy editing practices: the role and responsibilities of the copy editor; techniques of news editing, headline writing and photo editing; basics of newspaper layout.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  and either MSC 213  or MSC 275  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MSC 487 - Specialty Publications


    The principles and practices of editing publications, such as brochures, newsletters and specialty magazines for business and non-profit organizations, planning, editing, design, production and circulation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200 ; MSC 213  or MSC 275  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MSC 489 - Advanced Reporting


    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 377  
  
  •  

    MSC 491 - Independent Research in Media & Strategic Communication


    A guided independent study on a topic in mass communication. Public meetings with the instructor required. A final research paper or project to be submitted at the end of the course.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: Senior Status and Permission of Department Chair
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MSC 492 - Independent Research in Media & Strategic Communication


    A guided independent study on a topic in mass communication. Public meetings with the instructor required. A final research paper or project to be submitted at the end of the course.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: Senior Status and Permission of Department Chair
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MSC 493 - Independent Research in Mass Communication


    A guided independent study on a topic in mass communication. Public meetings with the instructor required. A final research paper or project to be submitted at the end of the course.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing and Permission of the Department Chair
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MSC 496 - Seminar In Media & Strategic Communication


    A synthesis of theoretical knowledge and applied research skills in student’s area of specialization in mass communication. It is the culminating experience and capstone of the program.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Status
    Capstone Course
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MSC 498 - Internship in Media & Strategic Communication


    Participation in an off-campus, supervised work experience at a media organization. Regular meetings with the internship coordinator, periodic reports, as well as a final paper relating the work experience to the student’s coursework in mass communication required.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Second Term Sophomore Status
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MSC 499 - Special Topics in Media and Strategic Communications


    Designed to offer an intensive study opportunity in an area of specialization not covered in great depth by existing courses.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MSC 200  
    Offered When Needed

Mathematics

Registration for courses numbered 240 and above requires permission of the department chair.

  
  •  

    MTH 115 - Fundamentals Of Algebra


    A course designed to prepare students for college-level mathematics. Topics include algebraic operations, the function concept, graphs, products and factoring, exponents and radicals, roots of polynomial and rational functions. Math elective; does not fulfill core requirement.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MTH 123 - Mathematical Thinking


    The core mathematics course for students of business and the liberal arts, this course provides an overview of the mathematics used to solve problems which arise in modern society, business and science. The topics covered include probability, statistics, mathematics of finance and other contemporary topics. The emphasis is on decision making, critical thinking and conceptual understanding.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MTH 124 - Interpreting Information


    A conceptual introduction to fundamental concepts of statistics including: sampling, graphical representation of data, numerical summaries of data, basic ideas of inference, and regression. This course will focus on understanding statistical concepts through the examination of reports on newscasts and articles published in newspapers, magazines, and on-line rather than a formula/calculation based approach.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered during Special Sessions Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MTH 125 - Demystifying Numbers


    One of the core mathematics courses for students of the liberal arts, this course provides an overview of numbers in their different formulations, interpretations and applications. Students will see numbers in new and unusual ways. They will see interesting numbers arising in nature, the arts and cyber security, among other applications. These topics will be approached from a problem solving as well as critical thinking point of view.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered during Special Sessions, Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MTH 134 - Business Calculus


    A basic introduction to selected topics from calculus. Topics include elementary functions, rates of change, the derivative, differentiation, and integration with special emphasis on a variety of applications.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring. Offered in the Summer
  
  •  

    MTH 135 - Precalculus


    An intensive study of algebraic, trigonometric and exponential functions and their inverses. This course is designed to prepare students to take the full calculus sequence.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    MTH 153 - Mathematics for Education


    An intensive overview of the conceptual background which underlies the major mathematical themes found in the elementary school curriculum. Concepts to be explored are taken from elementary set theory, number systems and number sense, relationships between fractions and decimals, the use of ratio, intuitive probability and intuitive geometry. These topics will be approached from a problem solving point of view with an emphasis on the appropriate uses of technology.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    MTH 231 - Calculus 1


    Study of functions; limits; continuity; derivatives; differentiation of algebraic functions, implicit differentiation, geometric and physical applications, mean value theorem, differentials, anti-differentiation, areas by integration, areas of limits as sums, the definite integral, fundamental theorem of the calculus, and differentiating and integration of trigonometric functions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Offered in Fall & Spring Offered in the Summer
  
  •  

    MTH 232 - Calculus 2


    The continuation of MTH 231 . Topics include area under the curve, antiderivatives, techniques of integration, applications of the definite integral, and numerical techniques, improper integration, and Taylor polynomials.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: MTH 231  or Equivalent
    Offered in Fall & Spring Offered in the Summer
  
  •  

    MTH 233 - Calculus 3


    Study of polar coordinates, solid analytic geometry, introduction to vector analysis, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, tangent lines and planes, line integrals, multiple integration, double and triple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, infinite series.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequiste: MTH 231 , MTH 232 , or approval of department chair.
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MTH 236 - Introduction to Proof


    A course designed to bridge the gap between calculus and abstract mathematics. An introduction to logical propositions and connectives, mathematical language, and methods of proof. Selected topics from number theory, set theory, and functions will serve as the mathematical vehicles to develop these skills
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 232 
  
  •  

    MTH 240 - Theory of Numbers


    A study of the more important properties of the natural number system: divisibility, primes, recurring series, congruences, quadratic residues, Diophantine equations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 231 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    MTH 250 - Linear Algebra


    Introduction to vectors, vector fields, vector space Rn, bases of Rn, subspaces, projections, matrices and determinants, linear mappings, matrix representations of linear mappings, matrices and systems of linear equations, rank, existence and uniqueness of solutions, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 231 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    MTH 270 - Applied Statistics


    An introductory course in applied statistics. The basic ideas of analysis of data and statistical inference are introduced. Discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling distribution, confidence intervals, testing hypotheses, regression, correlation, chi-square tests, and analysis of variance. Applications drawn from economics, management sciences, and life sciences. Use of appropriate technology.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 123  or MTH 124  or MTH 125  or MTH MTH 134  or MTH 231  
    Offered in Fall & Spring Offered in the Summer
  
  •  

    MTH 302 - Differential Equations


    Standard methods of solution of ordinary differential equations of the first order and some special equations of higher order; general theory of linear differential equations; Green’s functions; series solutions; applications.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 232  or equivalent.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    MTH 310 - Discrete Mathematics


    Set theory and mathematical logic, combinatorics, binomial and multinomial theorems, graph theory, digraphs and matrices, Boolean algebras, Boolean functions, and switching theory will be covered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 231 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    MTH 403 - Geometry


    A unified study of various types of geometry and their roles in the analytic development of the fundamental properties of generalized geometric spaces. Axiomatics of affine, projective, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Advantages and disadvantages of synthetic and analytic forms of proof.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    MTH 406 - Introduction to Topology


    An information course aimed at reinforcing fundamental concepts of calculus. Theorems and problems connected with the following items will be discussed and studied: elements of point set theory, neighborhood, connectedness, real line, compactness, denumerability, sequences, continuity, homeomorphism.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Approval Required. Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MTH 408 - Automata and Formal Languages


    An introduction to the theory of computation, emphasizing finite automata and regular languages. Additional topics to be discussed are pushdown automata and context-free languages, and an introduction to Turing Machines and unsolvability.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: MTH 163  or MTH 310  and CS 301 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MTH 410 - Advanced Calculus


    A more rigorous development of theoretical calculus with special emphasis on such topics as partial differentiation, differentiability, implicit function theorem, inverse function theorem, infinite series and sequences of functions, uniform convergence and boundedness.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 233 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    MTH 411 - Vector Analysis


    A course in vector analysis stressing the following topics: vector algebra; differentiation of vector functions; line, surface and space integrals, gradient, divergence, curl; the theorems of Gauss, Green and Stokes; vector spaces and transformations; differential K-forms and the generalized Stokes theorem.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 233  or equivalent.
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    MTH 415 - Complex Variables


    An introductory course in functions of a complex variable stressing the following topics: the complex numbers system; differentiation and integration of functions of a complex variable; power series; the calculus of residues; conformal mapping.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 233  or equivalent
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    MTH 421 - Abstract Algebra 1


    Binary operations; groups; subgroups; permutations; cyclic groups; direct products; cosets; normal subgroups; factor groups; Homomorphisms and Isomorphisms.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MTH 422 - Abstract Algebra 2


    A continuation of MTH 421  covering the following topics: rings; integral domains; fields; ideals; polynomials; homomorphisms, isomorphisms; and automorphisms; the fundamental theorem of algebra.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MTH 432 - Probability and Statistics I


    An overview of probability and statistics. Experiments; sample spaces; random variables; probability measures and distributions; combinatorics; expectation; data collection and analysis; confidence intervals; selected hypothesis tests.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 232 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    MTH 433 - Probability and Statistics II


    A rigorous development and extension of the topics in MTH 432 . Tests of hypothesis; regression, analysis of variance; multivariate distributions; nonparametric methods.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 432 
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
  •  

    MTH 440 - History and Foundations of Mathematics


    Evolution of mathematics as an abstract speculative science. A survey of the outstanding contributions to the development of mathematics; the hypothetical nature of mathematical truths; examination of some of the important postulational systems of modern geometries and algebras; the role of symbolic logic and set theory in the modern structure of mathematics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Capstone Course Offered in the Fall Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MTH 441 - Mathematical Modeling


    This course explores the process of constructing and implementing mathematical models for a large variety of situations. Models from the physical life and social sciences will be examined using deterministic and probabalistic methods, both continuous and discrete. A strong emphasis will be placed on independent and cooperative work and presentation of results in oral and written form. Capstone experience in applied mathematics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: MTH 302 , MTH 310 , MTH 270 , or MTH 433  and CS 201 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    MTH 451 - Senior Reading Course


    Independent reading course in mathematics. Weekly papers and a final examination will be required. 1, 2, or 3 credits.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    MTH 461 - Capstone Seminar


    This seminar (offered as a hybrid course) serves as the culminating experience for mathematics majors and those students majoring in Adolescent Education (Mathematics). This seminar will introduce students to mathematical literature of both historical importance and of contemporary interest. The readings will survey various disciplines in mathematics. Students will be required to make both oral and written summaries of published articles and to create an annotated bibliography on a mathematical topic
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing
  
  •  

    MTH 491 - Special Topics in Mathematics


    This course explores selected topics in mathematics. May be taken more than once for credit.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
    Department Consent Required

Nursing

  
  •  

    NUR 300 - Culture of Health


    This course examines theories and principles of health promotion, disease prevention and risk reduction. Primary (prevention), secondary (detection) and tertiary (reduction of continuing risk) will be reviewed. Contemporary theories of health promotion will be examined. Current federal guidelines for prevention will be addressed. Health literacy and health teaching will be discussed in the context of patient centered care.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters.
  
  •  

    NUR 301 - Health Assessment


    This course will provide students with the ability to understand principles of health and apply them to daily living. Students will use theory to apply healthy behaviors to individuals and families in order to develop plans of health for them throughout their lifespan. Utilizing national goals for health, e.g. Healthy People 2020, CDC Guidelines and Institute of Medicine documents, students will identify health behaviors for themselves and their patients. As well, students will be provided with the skills necessary to assess health through therapeutic interviews and physical assessment in order to differentiate between normal and abnormal health findings. This course includes a laboratory component.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters.
  
  •  

    NUR 302 - Exploring Nursing: Appreciating History, Exploring the Present, Creating the Future


    This student led seminar will delve into the rich history of nursing, explore trends in nursing today, and provide students with a forum for innovative thinking to co-create the future of nursing within the health care system. Students will select topics of interest (with faculty approval) and utilize creative strategies to engage their group of colleagues.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    NUR 310 - Pharmacology


    This course investigates principles of pharmacology as they apply to pharmacologic intervention in the care of patients. Principles of pharmacodynamics, drug-drug interactions, adverse effects and side effects will be discussed within the context of the nursing process and care planning.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters.
  
  •  

    NUR 311 - Pathophysiology


    This course explores alternations in physiologic mechanisms as they relate to health and illness. Common pathophysiologic alterations will be presented with attention to the impact of these alterations on the mind, body and spirit of the individuals affected by them. The role of genetics will be explored and considered within the context of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    NUR 315 - Considerations in Care of the Aging Adult


    This course examines the experiences of aging in American culture and the role of the nurse in facilitating health and reducing risk. The course will focus on the fastest growing population in America, individuals over the age of 65 and the frail elderly and examine the role of nursing in engaging in the health, wellness and quality of life in this population. Physiologic, psychologic, developmental and social issues will be discussed.  The course will also examine the role of family care giving and end-of-life experiences. Emphasis will be given to syndromes most often associated with aging, such as polypharmacy, decompensatory pathologies, frailty, abuse and geriatric syndromes. Strategies essential for the treatment and coordination of care for individuals and families dealing with aging family members, as well as the impact on population health locally, nationally, and globally will be addressed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    NUR 316 - Nursing Care of the Adult and Aging Patient


    This course provides students with the information, knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide safe, high quality care to adults from early adulthood through the aging process. Acute and chronic health issues, adult development, primary, secondary and tertiary prevention will be addressed. Issues of diversity and inclusivity will be explored within the context of the delivery of nursing care.  Concepts of patient advocacy will be discussed with application of these concepts to direct patient care. This course includes both didactic/theorectical learning as well as exposure to adult patients in a variety of clinical settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 8
    Prerequisites: NUR 301  and NUR 320  
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    NUR 320 - Patient Centered Nursing Care


    This course provides nursing students with critical thinking skills necessary to begin engaging in the nursing process to safely assess patient needs and identify quality interventions to meet those needs. The nursing process as the critical thinking model of nursing care will be presented and applied to actions basic to nursing care, the promotion of healthy physiologic and psychosocial responses to actual and potential health issues. This course includes a laboratory component.  Students will be expected to participate in both clinical laboratory and clinical patient settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 8
    Prerequisite or Co-requisite: NUR 301  
    Offered in the Fall Semester.
  
  •  

    NUR 401 - Care of Individuals and Populations with Behavioral/Mental Health


    This course investigates the role of the nurse in the application of nursing process to individuals and groups with behavioral and mental health disorders. Prevention, assessment and nursing treatment of individuals and groups with behavioral and mental health disorders will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on assisting individuals, families and communities with the promotion, restoration, maintenance of health and the evaluation of nursing care in those situations. This course includes both didactic/theoretical learning as well as exposure to adult patients in a variety of in-patient and out-patient behavioral health clinical settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisite: NUR 301  
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters. Offered in the Summer.
  
  •  

    NUR 402 - Population Health: Nursing Care in the Community


    This course investigates the role of the nurse in the application of nursing process to groups of individuals or to communities with similar health needs and problems.  This course will focus on the needs of communities and groups of individuals within communities in need of mental health prevention care as well as acute and chronic mental health needs. Emphasis is placed on assisting individuals, families and communities with the promotion, restoration, maintenance of health and the evaluation of nursing care in those situations. This course includes both didactic/theoretical learning as well as exposure to adult patients in a variety of clinical settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisite: NUR 301  
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters. Offered in the Summer.
  
  •  

    NUR 410 - Nursing Care of Women and the Childbearing Family


    This course focuses in the information, knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide safe, high qualtiy care to women and the childbearing family. Acute and chronic health issues experienced by women, their partners and children, including issues of diversity and inclusivity will be explored within the context of the delivery of nursing care. Concepts of patient advocacy will be discussed with application of these concepts to direct patient care. This course includes both didactic/theorectical learning as well as exposure to adult patients in a variety of clinical settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisite: NUR 301  
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters. Offered in the Summer.
  
  •  

    NUR 411 - Nursing Care of Children


    This course focuses in the information, knowledge and attitudes necessary to provide safe, high quality care to children and the childbearing family. Acute and chronic health issues, child and family development, primary, secondary and tertiary prevention will be addressed. Issues of diversity and inclusivity will be explored within the context of the delivery of nursing care. Concepts of patient advocacy will be discussed with application of these concepts to direct patient care. This course includes both didactic/theorectical learning as well as exposure to adult patients in a variety of clinical settings.
    Lecture
    Credits: 6
    Prerequisite: NUR 301  
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters. Offered in the Summer.
  
  •  

    NUR 420 - Research, Evidence, and Innovation


    This course will introduce concepts and processes required for the comprehension of research. The role of research in nursing will be addressed.  Multiple methods upon which to base best practices in nursing and data gathering for quality improvement will be introduced. Processes involved in asking clinical questions, searching databases, retrieving and appraising literature and critiquing research  and evidence based decisions will be discussed. The philosophy of human-centered design will be investigated as a problem solving strategy for nursing and health care.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NUR 430 - Leadership Development in Transitions to Professional Nursing


    This capstone course is designed to integrate didactic and clinical work to day and to explore fundamental issues in leadership and the application of leadership theory to clinical nursing. The framework within which these issues will be explored is the Center for Creative Leadership’s (CCL) approach to leadership development that probs leadership of self in the context of self awareness, leadership of groups and leadership of systems. Concepts of leadership will be explored in the context of history, current events in health care and exploration of future possibilities for the profession of nursing. Students will apply and reflect upon clinical and leadership.  Students will complete a 45 hour Leadership Workshop and Seminar and a 3 week precepted clinical experience.
    Lecture
    Credits: 6
    Department Consent Required
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    NUR 3000 - Culture of Health


    This course examines theories and principles of health promotion, disease prevention and risk reduction. Primary (prevention), secondary (detection) and tertiary (reduction of continuing risk) will be reviewed. Contemporary theories of health promotion will be examined. Current federal guidelines for prevention will be addressed. Health literacy and health teaching will be discussed in the context of patient centered care.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters
  
  •  

    NUR 3010 - Health Assessment


    This course will provide students with the ability to understand principles of health and apply them to daily living. Students will use theory to apply healthy behaviors to individuals and families in order to develop plans of health for them throughout their lifespan. Utilizing national goals for health, e.g. Healthy People 2020, CDC Guidelines and Institute of Medicine documents, students will identify health behaviors for themselves and their patients. As well, students will be provided with the skills necessary to assess health through therapeutic interviews and physical assessment in order to differentiate between normal and abnormal health findings. This course includes a laboratory component.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters.
  
  •  

    NUR 3020 - Exploring Nursing: Appreciating History, Exploring the Present, Creating the Future


    This student led seminar will delve into the rich history of nursing, explore trends in nursing today, and provide students with a forum for innovative thinking to co-create the future of nursing within the health care system. Students will select topics of interest (with faculty approval) and utilize creative strategies to engage their group of colleagues.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    NUR 3100 - Pharmacology


    This course investigates principles of pharmacology as they apply to pharmacologic intervention in the care of patients. Principles of pharmacodynamics, drug-drug interactions, adverse effects and side effects will be discussed within the context of the nursing process and care planning.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semesters.
  
  •  

    NUR 3110 - Pathophysiology


    This course explores alternations in physiologic mechanisms as they relate to health and illness. Common pathophysiologic alterations will be presented with attention to the impact of these alterations on the mind, body and spirit of the individuals affected by them. The role of genetics will be explored and considered within the context of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    NUR 3150 - Considerations in Care of the Aging Adult


    This course examines the experiences of aging in American culture and the role of the nurse in facilitating health and reducing risk. The course will focus on the fastest growing population in America, individuals over the age of 65 and the frail elderly and examine the role of nursing in engaging in the health, wellness and quality of life in this population. Physiologic, psychologic, developmental and social issues will be discussed.  The course will also examine the role of family care giving and end-of-life experiences. Emphasis will be given to syndromes most often associated with aging, such as polypharmacy, decompensatory pathologies, frailty, abuse and geriatric syndromes. Strategies essential for the treatment and coordination of care for individuals and families dealing with aging family members, as well as the impact on population health locally, nationally, and globally will be addressed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
 

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