2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Jun 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

Finance

  
  •  

    FIN 329 - Financial Institutions, Markets and Money


    A study of money and credit, financial institutions, central banking and monetary policy, money and capital markets, international financial institutions and markets, and financial regulations and the regulating agencies. Topics include the role of financial institutions and their sources and uses of funds, assets and liability management, the federal reserve system and its monetary policy, money and capital market instruments and the dimensions of international banking.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210 , BUS 230  and ECO 202 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    FIN 333 - Global Finance


    A thorough exploration of the multidimensionalities of the global financial marketplace: its environment, major players and instruments, analyzed from a business, managerial perspective. Topics include the international monetary system, balance of payment, exchange rate determination, international financial markets and its instruments, international investment, global banking activities, and selected topics in international corporate finance.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 210  & BUS 230 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    FIN 350 - Sports Finance


    This course covers the financial aspects of the sports industry, which generates hundreds of billions of dollars per year in economic activity. It starts with the examination of public and private sector financing of amateur, collegiate and professional sports organizations and dicsusses its ever growing need for financial management skills. Topics include: Public and Private financing of sports and events, labor market issues, costs and benefits of a franchise or a facility to a city, monopoly and antitrust, and sports franchise as profit-maximizing firms.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210  & BUS 230 
  
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    FIN 410 - Management of Financial Institutions


    This course covers the development of management policies and operations of depository financial institutions. The various sources and uses of funds are analyzed in terms of the banking environment and the basic considerations in commercial banking. The following topics are discussed: structure of the banking system, balance sheet management, deposits, other liabilities, capital structure, cash and liquidity, significant aspects of bank lending, investment policies, trust services, international banking and profitability analysis.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210 , FIN 329 , and ECO 308  or ECO 4102
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FIN 411 - Principles of Cash Manangement


    A comprehensive analysis of the issues invloved in managing short-term financial assets. Topics include: the collections and disbursements systems, accounts receivables and payables management, electronic commerce, treasury technology, short-term investments and borrowing, and risk management, and international cash management.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210  & BUS 230 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FIN 429 - Option Pricing


    This course covers financial derivatives for students in the Finance program. This course concentrates on financial derivatives options and concepts, market particulars, and pricing determination associated to the derivative marketplace. These concepts are then generalized for other derivatives.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210 , BUS 230  
  
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    FIN 431 - Investment Analysis


    An evaluation of common stocks by fundamental and technical methods; of bonds, convertible securities and options employing risk/return analysis; and of mutual funds and other investment media by an analysis of their performance records. Personal portfolio management will also be discussed. The impact of contemporary economic conditions and policies on these investment instruments is also anlayzed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210  & BUS 230 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    FIN 436 - International Financial Management


    The course covers the foundations of financial management for corporations with international operations. After reviewing the multinational environment and foreign exchange market, the course focuses on concepts and basic techniques of foreign exchange and political risk management, multinational cash and working capital management, foreign direct investment, foreign project evaluation, and multinational tax management.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210  and BUS 230  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FIN 437 - International Financial Markets and Banking


    A study of the structure and operation of international financial markets and banking. The coverage includes the foreign exchange market, Eurocurrency, Eurocredit and Eurobond markets, foreign segments of the national debt and equity markets, currency derivatives markets and international banking. Institutions and instruments traded in these markets are examined with a special reference to integration, innovation, and regulatory issues.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210  and BUS 230  
    Not Liberal Arts
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    FIN 438 - Sustainable Finance


    An introduction to how sustainability (economic, environmental and social) issues have become financially material to the global credit, underwriting and asset management capital markets. These issues have a direct impact on risk exposure and the quality of debt/equity investments and returns. By the end of the course, students should understand how these issues affect investment decisions made by institutional investors, corporate lenders, insurance companies, asset management funds, hedge funds, venture capitalists and retail investors, as well as business decisions made by corporate managers.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210  & BUS 230 
  
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    FIN 440 - SMIF: Student Managed Investment Fund


    SMIF: Student Managed Investment Fund - provides students with an experiential learning opportunity to manage a real time investment portfolio. This experience will enable students to develop an understanding of various portfolio objectives and policies, as well as an appreciation of different investment strategies and styles.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 230  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
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    FIN 441 - Student Managed Investment Portfolio Fixed Income


    This course will expand our offerings utilizing the Bloomberg stations in the LaPenta-Lynch Trading Room.  Students will use a mock portfolio to plan, analyze, and select fixed income investments, learning both allocation and selection processes while applying portfolio risk-return measurements. FIN 441 is an expansion of concepts covered in FIN 440 Student managed Investment Fund (SMIF): Equity Specialty Portfolio.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210 , BUS 230  

     
    Offered in the Spring semester.

  
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    FIN 450 - Financial Analyst Reporting: CFA Research Challenge


    This course covers skills needed to write an analyst report. Skills covered include Financial Analytical, Financial Modeling, and Financial Analysis Reporting. This course incorporates the CFA research challenge.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BUS 210 , BUS 230  
    Offered in the Fall and Spring semesters.
  
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    FIN 456 - Independent Study in Finance


    Students undertake an advanced, specialized study project not covered by the regular course offerings. Students participate in individual conferences with a faculty member to plan, execute and discuss the findings of the project.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
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    FIN 465 - Internship in Finance


    Students are placed in a public agency or private business under the direct supervision of an executive of the organization. Students must consult on a scheduled basis with a faculty member to plan, execute and discuss the findings of the project.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Two 300 or 400 level Finance courses and a minimum GPA of 3.0
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer Not Liberal Arts
    Department Consent Required
  
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    FIN 490 - Seminar in Finance


    Supervised research in advanced theoretical and empirical topics.
    Seminar
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 230  
    Not Liberal Arts. Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
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    FIN 491 - Special Topics in Finance


    In-depth coverage of a selected topic in finance.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1, 2, or 3
    Not liberal arts.
    Offered when needed.

Fine and Performing Arts

  
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    FPA 105 - Piano Instruction


    The course entails learning the basics of piano playing. It is primarily designed for the novice at the keyboard, although students that have a limited background are welcome as well. More advanced students can pursue study with special arrangement with the instructor.
    Laboratory
    Credits: 1
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    FPA 200 - Art Appreciation


    An introduction to concepts, theories, and principles of art, through slide study, museum visits, lecture and discussion. Includes art from ancient times to present. For any student interested in developing basic “visual literacy.” Required museum and gallery visits.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Offered in the Summer
    Core Course
  
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    FPA 201 - Introduction to the Theatre, Theatre Elements


    An overview of the nature, purpose and functions of theatre, with a focus on the playwright, the producer, the theatre in the Asian continent, the theatre in the African continent, the theatre is the Latino, LGBT +, Women and additional underrepresented theatre in the world. The theatre in The United States such as Musical Theatre, Regional Theatre, Broadway Theatre, and Off Broadway Theatre will also be covered. Attendance at The Iona College Theatre Ensemble production as well as attendance at a New York City theatre event is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
    Core Course
  
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    FPA 202 - Music Appreciation


    Directed at developing the ability to understand and enjoy music, this class explores the technique of listening, including a study of the general principles underlying all musical form and the analysis and interpretation of these forms. Working in a drumming ensemble and learning the basics of recorder are part of the live music experience. Classroom use of recorded and live illustrations supplemented by required attendance at live performances. Topics covered include: Music Used for Religious Purposes, Music & Politics, Music & Storytelling, Music & Drama.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring.
    Offered in the Summer
    Core Course
  
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    FPA 203 - Drawing and Painting I


    An introduction to visual perception, problem-solving, and human creativity through the study of principles. Museum and gallery visits, discussion and development of visual/manual skills involved in the drawing/painting process. For students who think they cannot draw but have a desire to learn or for those who are insecure about their drawing skills. No previous experience required. Not for intermediate students who have had basic classes in high school or private lessons.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Offered in the Summer
    Core Course
  
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    FPA 205 - Introduction to the Theatre, Theatre Foundations


    An overview of the nature, purpose and functions of theatre, with a focus on the origins of theatre, the developments of the audience, performer, director, design elements and the theatre in the European continent. Attendance at The Iona College Theatre Ensemble production as well as attendance at a New York City theatre event is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
    Core Course
  
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    FPA 206 - Introduction to Theatre History


    An overview of the history of the western theatre tradition from its origins to the modern era. A theatre practicum is required that includes participation in The Department of Fine and Performing Arts theatre productions. Assignments can include work on scenery, lighting, properties, sound, costuming, publicity, rehearsal and performance. Attendance at a New York City theatre event is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    FPA 207 - Shakespeare in Performance


    An overview of the fundamentals of the performance styles and production elements of Elizabethan England and The Renaissance Era to the present through the selected plays of William Shakespeare. Study of characterization, portrayal of roles, and identification of distinct acting styles of the each era will be explored and discussed. The directorial style and theatre elements such as stage design, lighting design, costuming and sound design that were used during each era will also be discussed. The performing styles and production elements that are seen in the works of Shakespeare will be discussed and identified by using examples from plays, videos and through attending performances of two Shakespeare dramatic works. Coursework includes lecture, discussion, writings and presentations. Required attendance at two New York City area productions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Offered in the Summer
    Core Course
  
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    FPA 209 - Women in Music


    Women in Music considers, examines and debates the role of women in music both as practitioners and patrons. The course takes an historical journey that enables the student to see the changing roles of women in society as well as the prejudices against women in the arts as well as the strides made by women composers and performers. Patrons of the arts are included as well in the course which envelopes contemporary musical styles in addition to concert and folk music. The focus is on music produced in the Western countries, although some time will be spent on the role of women in music in non-Western cultures.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
    Core Course
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
  
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    FPA 211 - Introduction to Sculpture


    This course will introduce students to the process, methods and concepts of sculpture, an overview of its history, with a special emphasis on student exploration of the basic materials and techniques of 3-D design in a studio, with projects including: bas-relief, carving, modeling in clay, portrait and figure, and construction. Required NYC museum visit.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Core Course
     
  
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    FPA 212 - Art History: Prehistoric Era to the Middle Ages


    This class provides a study of the history of art, from the earliest beginnings in the Prehistoric periods to the end of the Middle Ages. Works of art are examined as both monuments of intrinsic aesthetic value and as expressions of the needs, ideals, and aspirations of the societies and times in which they were created.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Core Course
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives
  
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    FPA 213 - Art History: Renaissance to Modern Art


     This course is a survey of visual art covering art movements from the “Proto” and Early Renaissance to the art of the modern world. Although the focus will be on painting, sculpture and architecture of the Western world, additional art forms as well as other cultures, will be referenced throughout the semester. World events, politics and philosophy from various periods will also be discussed to present the artwork in a proper historical context. The course will consist of lectures/discussions on new topics each class. Participation is strongly encouraged.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
    Core Course
  
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    FPA 214 - Theatre for Social Justice


    The study of theatre and how it relates to social justice. Topics will include how theatre has influenced, supported and investigated throughout history the issues of human rights as well as under served populations and areas such as the rights and respect for women, minorities, the environment and workers.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Core Course
    Offered in Fall, Winter, Spring and Special Sessions
  
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    FPA 220 - Dance Appreciation


    An overview of the essential properties of dance through lecture, viewing, discussion, and the practice of movement. The course examines the context through which various traditions evolve, the approaches to dance construction/revision articulated by selected masters and the expressive commonality in diverse traditions and artists.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring Offered in the Summer
  
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    FPA 225 - Theatre History: The Ancient Greek Theatre to The Renaissance


    An overview of the history of the western theatre tradition from its origins to the Renaissance (450 BC - 1700 AD). Coursework includes lecture, discussion, readings and theatre practicum. Required attendance at a New York City theater event.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    FPA 226 - Theatre History: The Renaissance to the Modern Theatre


    An overview of the history of the western theatre tradition from the Renaissance to the modern era (1700 AD - Present). Coursework includes lecture, discussion, readings and theatre practicum. Required attendance at a New York City theater event.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FPA 229 - Introduction to Classical Acting


    An introduction to classical styles of acting. Plays and other writings from the Ancient Greek, Ancient Roman, Medieval, Elizabethan, Jacobean, and Restoration eras and the 18th century will be explored. Concern with actor as creative instrument, basic techniques of stage movement. Required attendance at NYC theatre event. Reports and performance final.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FPA 230 - Introduction to Acting


    Theories of acting styles and techniques. Concern with actor as creative instrument. Exploration with the process in preparing for a role. It covers basic acting principles, including action, objective, obstacles, conflict, beats and given circumstances. The evolution of acting techniques, styles and significant contributors to the craft of acting will also be identified and discussed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    FPA 235 - Music in Film and Video


    An overview of the evolution and use of music in film before and after the introduction of the sound track. The role of music will be studied and discussed using select examples of films and videotapes. Original compositions for films will be stressed, as well as innovative uses of existing scores.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    FPA 236 - History of Popular Music in America


    The history of popular music as a part of American culture will be examined starting with minstrel shows and the music of Stephen Foster and continuing through to Rock of the late twentieth century. Critical listening, including a basic understanding of the principles underlying music composition, and academic engagement of popular forms will be emphasized. This class is directed at developing an understanding of the history of and role popular music has played in the development of the American culture. Societal issues such as race, gender roles and politics will be discussed as well. Classroom use of recorded examples will be used, student analysis of critical commentary will be included, as well as student attendance at a live on-campus performance.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
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    FPA 237 - Music in World Cultures


    Music in World Cultures is the study of music and its place in the lives of peoples around the world and in the United States. Issues such as music and identity, music as a representation of a culture or ethnicity and the role of music in daily life will be discussed as well as the variety of musical instruments found throughout the world. Students will also have an opportunity to play world instruments as part of their study.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    FPA 238 - Music History: Medieval through Baroque


    Directed at developing an understanding and appreciation for the development of Western concert music from the early Middle Ages (c. 500) through the High Baroque period (c. 1750), including a study of the general principles underlying musical forms and the analysis and interpretation of these forms. Classroom use of recorded and live illustrations supplemented by required attendance at live performances.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    FPA 239 - Music History: Classical through Modern


    This class is directed at developing an understanding and appreciation for the development of Western concert music from the Classical period (c. 1750) through the modern era, including a study of the general principles underlying musical forms and the analysis and interpretation of these forms. Classroom use of recorded and live illustrations supplemented by required attendance at live performances.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    FPA 240 - Introduction to World Dance Forms


    This course examines the confluence of factors that affected the development of dance forms in selected Western and non-Western societies, through lecture, viewing, writing, and discussion. Emphasis will be on the dance of India, Japan, the Middle East, and the Ireland and British Isles. Dance viewings at Iona College and New York City required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FPA 244 - Introduction to Ballet


    An introduction to the art of ballet. Coursework includes study of ballet technique and history from classical to contemporary forms. Attendance at concerts is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester Offered in the Summer
  
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    FPA 245 - Introduction to Choreography


    This course introduces students to the investigation, study and practice of dance composition. Focus is placed on basic choreographic principles such as shape, space, time and structure. Emphasis on the development of individual movement vocabulary through improvisation as expressed in the performance of solo phrases, duets and group work. Further consideration is given to the ideas and choreography of influential choreographers. Student work, as well as that of noted choreographers, is critiqued in classroom discussion and written work. Classroom warm-up with an emphasis on fundamental principles of movement is given during each class. Required attendance at three NY City dance concerts and one on-campus. Final open studio showing of student dances is presented to an invited audience.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    FPA 246 - Digital Photography and Imaging Manipulation


    This course will introduce students to the processes, methods and concepts of digital photography and the “virtual darkroom.” It is designed to develop the foundation for the visual literacy required to read, interpret and create the photographic images of the 21st century. Basic visual elements of design underlying all photography and applied photography are introduced. Students engage in the creative process of producing photographs with the digital camera, learn to make “darkroom” adjustments on their images, and begin to explore the various techniques of image manipulation made possible in Photoshop. Students must have a digital camera of 3.0 mega pixels or more and connectors for computer download of images. Visit to NYC museum required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    FPA 250 - Modern Dance I


    The principles and practice of modern dance. Focus on movement technique and expression, as well as the history and aesthetic beliefs of major contributors to the field. Attendance at concerts is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester Offered in the Summer
  
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    FPA 258 - Music and Politics


    Music and Politics examines the role music plays in various political arenas as a means of promoting electoral campaigns, political issues and identities. In addition, music used as a political tool of oppression and nationalism as well as the suppression or restriction of music and composers as well as issues of gender diversity and will be discussed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    FPA 259 - Music Theory


    This course examines the mechanics of music and how to understand and work with them.  Fundamentals skills such as notation, scales, chords and melody will be studied leading to the composition of an original melody and the harmonizing of it.  An understanding of the establishment and changes in music theory through the course of music history will be covered as well as experience attending and writing about a concert. Work is conducted through class lecture, discussion and group work, online drills, class presentation and regular homework assignments.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    FPA 260 - Jazz Dance: From Roots to Hip Hop and Beyond


    Examination of the jazz dance idiom through movement, discussion, reading, writing and viewing.  Course work focuses on the development of jazz as a distinctly American art form, from its African roots to its ever-evolving present in hip hop, house and club dance.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    FPA 275 - Women in Dance


    The course examines the contributions and innovations of women choreographers, dancers, dance educators and dance critics. Focus is placed on how women have shaped the creation and profile of dance as an art form, the Western theatre, and what informs their artistic vision. Further consideration will be given to how society has evaluated, viewed and at a time directed the role of women in this disicpline. Students will attend two concerts; one in New York City and one at Iona College. Coursework involves lecture, discussion and viewing of dance works.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Alternate Years
  
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    FPA 304 - Drawing and Painting II


    A continuation of the principles and practice of drawing and painting begun in FPA 203  with emphasis on advanced techniques, new materials, and personal expression.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FPA 203  or permission of department chair
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FPA 340 - Iona Dance Ensemble


    The course focuses on the process of creating and performing of original works by resident faculty and guest choreographers. Developed choreographic works are rehearsed and presented in public performances. Participation in dance performance is required.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Instructor Consent Required
  
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    FPA 359 - Music Theory


    Music Theory is the study of common practice tonal harmony and melodic constructs. Students will learn to analyze and listen to music on a deep level. Material covered will include scales and tonal centers, intervals and chord construction and analysis, melodic harmonization and chord progression development and analysis. Ear training and solfege are included in this class. The final project will include harmonization of existing and original melodies and chorale analysis. Students must have experience in music and must gain permission of the instructor to take this class.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FPA 234  or permission of instructor
    Offered When Needed
    Instructor Consent Required
  
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    FPA 360 - Iona College Instrumental Ensemble


    This course entails the preparation and public performance of music in a group setting. Coursework includes learning to work with a conductor, learning new music, the study of varied repertoire, and developing the skills necessary to be a versatile musician. Previous experience on the musical instrument you will play will be considerable asset to students in this course.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed
  
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    FPA 388 - Iona College Vocal Ensemble


    This course offers an opportunity to develop and increase skills as a vocalist with like-minded singers. An incoming vocal ensemble member should be able to sing a song like “Happy Birthday” in tune and with correct rhythm. The rest of the student’s vocal progress will be taken care of by the professor. Those with past singing experience will see each voice grow and attain its highest potential.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FPA 391 - Iona College Theatre Ensemble


    The course provides a detailed study of the theory and practice of theatre and acting. The craft of ensemble theatre work with plays from the classical to the modern era will be performed and produced. Coursework includes learinng to work with a director, an ensemble, theatre designers and personnel, script exploration, research and exploration of character and plays will be included.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
    Instructor Consent Required
  
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    FPA 403 - FPA Internship


    An internship experience provides the student with a hands-on opportunity to explore career interests in arts leadership field while applying knowledge and skills learned in the classroom in a field setting. The experience also helps students obtain a clearer sense of what they will need to learn and offers and opportunity to build professional networks and shape their career goals.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    FPA 404 - FPA Capstone Project


    This course is a research-based course representing a culmination of the academic and internship experiences received by the student during their work towards the B.A. in Arts Leadership. Students will work on research techniques as well as oral presentation techniques resulting in a major paper and oral presentation of an arts leadership proposal that would be ready for real world presentation.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing Only
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FPA 491 - Special Topics in Fine & Performing Arts


    These courses will allow students to explore subjects not available in the regular fine arts curriculum.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1-3

Foreign Language

  
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    FLA 100 - Special Topics in Foreign Languages


    A special topics elementary course focusing on a language different from those currently offered on a regular basis at the College. The course promotes the gradual development of the four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    FLA 101 - Special Topics in Foreign Languages


    A special topics elementary course focusing on a language different from those currently offered on a regular basis at the College. The course promotes the gradual development of the four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequsite: FLA 100 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FLA 200 - Special Topics in Foreign Languages


    A special topics intermediate course focusing on a language different from those currently offered on a regular basis at the College. The object of the course is to continue to build a solid base in all four skills–speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as students are engaged in intermediate level grammatical structures and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Intermediate level in the language and permission of the department chair.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    FLA 201 - Special Topics in Foreign Languages


    A special topics intermediate course focusing on a language different from those currently offered on a regular basis at the College. The object of the course is to continue to build a solid base in all four skills-speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as students are engaged in intermediate level grammatical structures and vocabulary.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FLA 200 , intermediate level of the language and permission of the department chair
    Offered in the Spring Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
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    FLA 300 - Special Topics in Foreign Languages


    A special topics advanced course focusing on a language different from those currently offered on a regular basis at the College. This course treats advanced topics related to the history, culture, or literature in the target language. Advanced grammatical structures are presented as students approach advanced proficiency in the four skill areas: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    FRE 103 - Elementary French 1


    Gradual development of the four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction to short excerpts of contemporary literary works and the culture of the country. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week. Credit only for students with no previous study of French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    FRE 104 - Elementary French 2


    Gradual development of the four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction to short excerpts of contemporary literary works and the culture of the country. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 103 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    FRE 150 - Beginning French Culture through Conversation


    This is an elementary French course providing an overview of the civilization and culture of the Francophone community. Although there is a promotion of all four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, emphasis is put on integrating the basic grammatical structures of the language into proficiency oriented activities focusing in on culturally relevant topics. There will be a use of videos, DVD’s, power-point presentations and a field trip will augment lectures and discussions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    FRE 210 - Intermediate French 1


    Review of the structure of the French language, intended to strengthen student’s aural/oral comprehension, develop their ability in written composition and increase their appreciation of French literature and civilization.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 104 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    FRE 211 - Intermediate French 2


    A further development of the student’s ability to use spoken and written French with special emphasis on the appreciation of French culture through readings in literature and contemporary texts.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 210  or equivalent
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    FRE 250 - Intermediate French Culture Through Conversation


    This is an intermediate French course providing an overview of the civilization and culture of the Francophone community. Although there is a promotion of all four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, emphasis is put on integrating the basic grammatical structures of the language into proficiency oriented activities focusing in on culturally relevant topics.  There will be a use of videos, DVDs, power-point presentations and a field trip will augment lectures and discussions.  Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week (or as required by the instructor). 
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite:  FRE 150  or equivalent
    3
  
  •  

    FRE 305 - Advanced French Composition 1


    A course in advanced compsition whose object is to develop in the student the ability to write French with facility and correctness. Included are a review of grammar, consideration of stylistics, considerable out-of-class writing of essays, and some translations in French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 211 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    FRE 306 - Advanced French Composition 2


    A course in advanced composition whose object is to develop in the student the ability to write French with facility and correctness. Included are a review of grammar,consideration of stylistics, considerable out-of-class writing of essays, and some translations into French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 211 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    FRE 307 - Advanced Conversation 1


    The objective of this course is to develop the student’s ability to speak French with facility and correctness. The course requires intensive practice in spoken French, directed conversation, oral reports and discussion of cultural and literary material read in preparation for the class.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 211 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    FRE 308 - Advanced Conversation 2


    The objective of this course is to develop the student’s ability to speak French with facility and correctness. The course requires intensive practice in spoken French, directed conversation, oral reports and discussion of cultural and literary material read in preparation for the class.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 211 
    Offered in Alternate Years Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    FRE 311 - Commercial French


    A practaical course in the vocabulary and idioms most used in commerical French language. Exercises in letter writing and reading and composition of reports. Especially geared towards those students who intend to work in international financial or business organizations. Taught in English and French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 305 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    FRE 312 - French Novel: From its Origins to Realism


    A study of the French novel from its beginnings through Realism. Background lectures and critical analyses of selected works of major authors including Madame de LaFayette, Rousseau, Stendhal, Balzac, George Sand and Flaubert. Course conducted in French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 305 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FRE 313 - The French Theater: From its Origins to Romantics


    A study of the theater in France from the medieval through the romantic period. Background lectures and critical analyses of selected plays of major authors including Corneille, Moliere, Racine, Marivaux, Beaumarchais, Hugo, Vigny an Musset. Course conducted in French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 305 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FRE 314 - Poetry And Short Story in France: Origins to the Eighteenth Century


    A study of the masterpieces of poetry and the short story produced in France from the Middle Ages through the eighteenth century. Critical analyses of selected works of major authors including Villon, DuBellay, Ronsard, La Fontaine, Marie de France, Marguerite de Navarre and Voltaire. Course conducted in French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 305 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FRE 417 - The French Novel: The Contemporary Period


    A study of the French novel from Naturalism to the present. Background lectures and critical analyses of selected works of major authors including Zola, Proust, Gide, Malraux, Mauriac, Sartre, Camus and Robbe-Grillet. Course conducted in French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 305 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FRE 418 - Contemporary French Theater


    A study of the theater in France from the time of Scribe with ‘la piece bien faite’ and Dumas with ‘la piece a these’ through the Theater of the Absurd. Background lectures and critical analyses of selected plays of major authors including Becque, Rostand, Maeterlinck, Claudel, Giraudoux, Anouilh, Sartre, Beckett and Ionesco. Course conducted in French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 305 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FRE 419 - Poetry and the Short Story in France in the Modern Period


    A study of the principal poets and short story writers of France from Romanticism to the present. Background lectures and critical analyses of selected major works by representative authors including Hugo, Lamartine, the Parnassians, the Symbolists, Peguy, Valery, the Surrealists, Daudet, Maupassant, Anatole France and Ayme. Course conducted in French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 305 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FRE 421 - French Civilization


    Lectures and discussions on the geography, history, economy, and current problems, French architecture, literature, music, painting, and sculpture. Extensive use of audio-visual aids. Course conducted in French.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: FRE 305 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    FRE 452 - Seminar in French Literature


    A review of the great ideas and ideals learned in the liberal arts core curriculum in light of what has been taught in major courses, with a view to integrating for the students the two branches of their programs of studies. Readings, research and discussion of selected authors, works or genres of French literature.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Capstone Course Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    FRE 453 - Special Topics in French


    The study of a selected topic concerning French or Francophone culture, language or literature.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    FRE 490 - Linked Internship in French


    A supervised work experience tied to an Iona College advanced course in French that requires regular use of the French language at an advanced level. The work may be in a variety of fields and may typically take place in a company, institute or other educational institution. The student will work five to six hours a week over a period of eight to ten weeks. As the internship is designed to supplement and extend the goals of the course with which it is linked, and the student is required to meet regularly with the professor of the course, write reports related to the experience, and submit a final project.
    Internship
    Credits: 1
    Prerequisite: major or minor in French in good academic standing and nine credits (3 courses) in advanced courses in French (300 or 400 level); by recommendation of the Department of Foreign Languages
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    FRE 495 - Internship in French


    A supervised work experience tied to an Iona College advanced course in French that requires regular use of the French language at an advanced level. The work may be in a variety of fields and may typically take place in a company, institute or other educational institution. The student intern is required to meet regularly with an internship advisor from the full-time faculty in French, write reports related to the experience and submit a final project.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: major or minor in French in good academic standing and nine credits (3 courses) in advanced courses in Italian (300 or 400 level); by recommendation of the Department of Foreign Languages
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    GER 103 - Elementary German 1


    Gradual development of the four language skills: Comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction to short excerpts from contemporary literary works of the German culture. Credit only for students with no previous study of German.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    GER 104 - Elementary German 2


    Gradual development of the four language skills: Comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction to short excerpts from contemporary literary works of the German culture. Credit only for students with no previous study of German.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: GER 103 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    GER 150 - Beginning German Culture Through Conversation


    Gradual development of the four language skills; comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction of excerpts from contemporary literary works. Introduction to German culture. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory drill. Credit only for students without previous German instruction.

    German 150 is an elementary level course highlighting the most important aspects in the development of the Germanic world, while honing students’ ability of expression in the target language. It will focus on the diversity of the German speaking world.

    The course will be taught with a flipped class method, where students will preview the grammar lessons as well as an introduction to the topic on-line before entering the class.  Supplemental materials will be provided to initiate dialogue on the various topics.

    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    GER 203 - Intensive Intermediate German


    Intensive review of the structure of the language intended to strengthen the student’s aural/oral comprehension and ability in written composition based on readings in modern literature.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: GER 104 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    GER 311 - Commercial German


    This course is designed to prepare the businessman who must deal with situations in the German business world and at the social level. Extensive vocabulary building to meet everyday commercial encounters. Insights on German life and manners.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    ITA 103 - Elementary Italian 1


    Gradual development of the four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction to short excerpts from contemporary literary works and Italian culture. Credit only for students with no previous study of Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    ITA 104 - Elementary Italian 2


    Gradual development of the four language skills: comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, with an early introduction to short excerpts from contemporary literary works and Italian culture. Credit only for students with no previous study of Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 103 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ITA 109 - Basic Italian Language and Culture


    This course will focus simultaneously on the fundamentals of the Italian language and Italian culture and history. Intended for students with no prior formal study of Italian, it is designed to be taken in conjunction with ITA 103 , complementing this course by exploring areas of grammar not typically treated in ITA 103 , such as the imperative and the past and future tenses will be through intensive drills and practice and by practicing in conversational settings learned structures. This course will also emphasize attainment of basic reading skills that will enable the student to access simple, but authentic texts. Longer readings in English that treat broad issues of Italian history and culture may be assigned.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Corequisite: ITA 103 
  
  •  

    ITA 150 - Beginning Italian Culture through Conversation


    This course focuses on the attainment of basic language skills of Italian, with particular emphasis on developing communicative skills.  The course also provides an overview of Italian history and a critical exploration of Italian culture, particularly with regard to current trends.  Classes conducted in Italian.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Core Course
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    ITA 151 - Beginning Italian Culture through Conversation II


    Gradual development of the four language skills, aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, through a close study of the structure of the Italian language and exploration of Italian culture.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 150  or equivalent.
    Core Course
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    ITA 203 - Intensive Intermediate Italian


    Intensive review of the structure of the language intended to strengthen students’ oral comprehension and ability in written composition based on reading in modern literature. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 104  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    ITA 205 - Intermediate Italian Language and Culture


    This course will balance the concern for providing instruction in language skills with a strong view toward presenting Italy’s regions through a systematic and lively survey of the characteristics and customs unique to each region.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 203  or equivalent or permission of Chair.
  
  •  

    ITA 209 - The Italian People and Their Culture 1


    An intensive on-the-scene study of Italy; a research into its past and present with visits to Rome, the Vatican, Castelgandolfo, Florence, Pisa and other locales rich in history, tradition, and culture. This course is open to non-majors of Italian and fulfills part of the present language requirement at Iona College. Offered in the Winter session when interest warrants.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 104 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    ITA 224 - Italian Conversation 1


    Conversation based on everyday topics and on readings taken from a wide range of current events in newspapers and/or magazines. The primary aim is to develop a speaking ability in Italian. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 104 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    ITA 225 - Italian Conversation 2


    Further conversation based on everyday topics and readings of current events in various periodicals. The primary aim of the course remains to develop a speaking ability in Italian. Three hours of class instruction and one hour of laboratory work per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ITA 224 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
 

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