2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    May 25, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

Course Descriptions


At the end of each course description, information is provided to indicate when the course will be scheduled.

Please note: Schedules are subject to change; check the PeopleSoft online schedule prior to each term’s registration.

Courses designated NLA (non-liberal arts) cannot be applied toward the minimum liberal arts credit requirements. Course prerequisites are included in this listing. Unless otherwise specified, a course does not have a prerequisite.

 

Biology

  
  •  

    BIO 314 - Ecology


    An introduction to ecology and field biology. Major areas to be covered include the ecosystem and the community, aquatic and terrestrial habitats, population ecology, conservation and resource management. Much of the laboratory work will consist of field trips to selected, diverse habitats in the metropolitan area.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: BIO 101 ,BIO 102  & MTH 115 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 315 - Conservation Biology


    This is an upper-level course in the field of conservation biology designed to provide students with the necessary background to evaluate evidence-based conservation of biological diversity. We will explore the ecological concepts constituting the scientific basis for the conservation of biodiversity and the main threats to biodiversity: habitat loss, invasive species, pollution, populations, climate change, and over-exploitation. The course will conclude with the process of extinction and the conservation and restoration actions we can take to slow the loss of biodiversity. Students will develop skills central to a conservation-related career by applying their knowledge to real-world decision making.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BIO 101  & BIO 102  or BIO 125  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 316 - Microbiology


    An introduction to the study of microorganisms and microbe-host interactions. Topics include microbial cell physiology, growth, metabolism, genetics, and host-microbe relationships (for both pathogens and commensals). Specific topics include viruses, epidemiology, and immunology, including innate and adaptive immune systems and immune disorders. Laboratory focuses on aseptic culture of bacteria, differential and selective testing for diagnostics, and microscopy.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: BIO 102 . Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHM 110  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 320 - Oceanography


    A detailed description of the world’s oceans. Topics to be included are physical, chemical and biological phenomena in the oceans. Special emphasis will be placed on the neritic environment.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BIO 101 , BIO 102 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 325 - Virology


    An introduction to the study of viruses, their interactions with hosts, and their mechanisms for causing disease. Specific topics will include viral replication strategies, viral transmission (epidemiology), medical interventions for prevention and treatment of viruses, and specific focus on viruses of current medical interest.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BIO 211  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    BIO 330 - Developmental Biology


    An introduction to biological development, from the formation of the egg, through embroyonic development, to sex determination and reproduction. Special topics such as plant development, aging, and the evolution of developmental mechanisms will be included. Classical experiments in embryology will complement modern research on molecular developmental mechanisms, and the use of model organisms (mice, frogs, chickens, fish, flies, worms, plants) will be stressed. Two hours lecture 4 hours of lab per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisite:  BIO 211 , BIO 399  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 399 - Cell Biology


    A study of cell structure and function, with an emphasis on eukaryotic structures. Topics will include membranes, organelles, the cytoskeleton, cell signaling, the cell cycle, and cancer. Key experiments will be discussed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BIO 101 ,BIO 102  & CHM 109 , CHM 110 
    Offered When Needed
  
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    BIO 402 - Histology


    A detailed study of the micro and ultramicroscopic anatomy of the fundamental tissues and organs of the mammalian body, including their functional and biomedical importance.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisites: BIO 211 , BIO 399 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    BIO 403 - Principles of Toxicology


    The goal of the course is to introduce students to the principles of toxicology that pertain to human health and the environment. Course content will include a survey of toxic chemicals, health effects of toxic agents, principles of absorption and the chemical and biological factors that affect toxicity. Applied disciplines of toxicology, such as ecotoxicology, mutagenesis, reproductive and developmental toxicology will also be discussed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite BIO 101 , BIO 102 , CHM 209 , CHM 210  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    BIO 406 - Neurobiology


    This course introduces students to the biology of the nervous system and its relationship to behavior and disease. The course covers topics ranging from neuronal structure and function, communication at the synapse, membrane receptors and intra- and intercellular signaling systems, to the gross organization of the brain. Various diseases and their effects on the brain will also be studied. The laboratory component includes an introduction to the various methods used in neurobiological research and demonstrates principles and concepts presented in lecture. The first part of the course entails structured laboratory experiments to provide experience with neuroanatomical (gross and cellular), neurophysiological and molecular biological approaches to studying neural organization and function. During this portion of the course, students learn to prepare laboratory reports in the style of a scientific research paper. The course concludes with a research project that extends over a period of several weeks culminating in the production of a final research paper. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.
    Lecture
    Credits: 5
    Prerequisite: BIO 399 
  
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    BIO 410 - Introduction to Pharmacology


    This course is an introduction into the field of pharmacology, the study of chemicals on living organisms. In this course, a survey will be conducted of the variety and types of drugs(natural and syntheic, legal and illegal) that are available to the human population. Drugs that affect the central nervous, endocrine, and cardiovascular systems, in addition to those that are used to combat cancer and other diseases will be covered in this course. Emphasis will be placed on mechanism of drug action and its effects on human biochemistry and physiology. Drug design and development, as used by the pharmaceutical industry, will also be studied.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CHM 210 
  
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    BIO 419 - Biochemistry: Proteins and Metabolism


    This course is a one-semester intensive biochemistry course designed for biology majors who are planning to continue their education in pre-professional or graduate school. The course will begin with a thorough investigation into the structure, function, and regulation of proteins, including the amino acids that make up proteins. Particular emphasis will be placed on enzymes and their kinetics and catalysis. The course will then delve into the structure of carbohydrates and lipids and finally into their metabolism. Principles such as acid/base relations and bioenergetics will be covered during this course and emphasis will be placed on how the three macromolecules participate together in the living cell.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BIO 211  and BIO 399 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 420 - Biochemistry Laboratory


    A laboratory course devoted to the study of the biochemistry and physiology of living systems. Utilizes the methods of spectrophotometry, chromatography, polarimetry, electrophoresis, radioisotope methodology and other modern techniques.
    Laboratory
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite: CHM 210 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    BIO 430 - Microbial Ecology


    A detailed description of the role of microorganisms in environmental phenomena. Included will be a discussion of the marine, freshwater and terrestial environment. Special emphasis will be placed on algae and bacteria.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisites: BIO 314 , BIO 316 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    BIO 440 - Research 1


    Open to a limited number of selected students evaluated in consonance with their qualifications and research interests.  Department consent required.  This course may be taken for 1, 2, or 3 credits based on advisement between the student and their faculty mentor.
    Thesis Research
    Credits: 1-3
    Prerequisite BIO 211  BIO 316  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
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    BIO 441 - Research 2


    Open to a limited number of selected students evaluated in consonance with their qualifications and research interests.  Department consent required.  This course may be taken for 1, 2, or 3 credits based on advisement between the student and their faculty mentor.
    Thesis Research
    Credits: 1-3
    Prerequisite BIO 211 , BIO 316  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
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    BIO 445 - Internship in Biology


    Student participation in an off-campus, supervised work experience related to biology with regular reporting to an assigned faculty member. Written and oral reports relating this work experience to the student’s course of studies will be submitted.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
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    BIO 446 - Internship in Biology


    Student participation in an off-campus, supervised work experience related to biology with regular reporting to an assigned faculty member. Written and oral reports relating this work experience to the student’s course of studies will be submitted.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
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    BIO 450 - Seminar


    An introduction to biological literature with reports on recent topics and advances in research. The survey and integration of courses will be emphasized.
    Seminar
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite: Senior Standing
    Capstone Course. Oral Intensive. Open to Seniors Only. Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    BIO 480 - Molecular Biology


    A fusion of genetics, cell biology, biochemistry, and information theory. Molecular Biology will examine living systems at a subcellular level with a focus on proteins and nucleic acids. Review of biochemical logic of life and prokaryotic molecular genetics; discussion of the techniques of molecular biology, including the use of computers in genomic research and molecular visualization; cellular regulation in eukaryotes, including both genetic and signal transduction mechanisms; advanced topics in eukaryotic mechanisms; advanced topics in eukaryotic molecular biology: cancer, viruses, the immune system, developmental mechanisms.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BIO 101 , BIO 102 , BIO 211 , BIO 399  Corequisite: BIO 481 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    BIO 481 - Molecular Biology Lab


    An intergrated laboratory experience including the analysis of genes and proteins, techniques in genetic engineering, the genetic manipulation of living cells, and the analysis of gene regulation. Four hours of lab per week
    Laboratory
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisites: BIO 102 , 103, BIO 211 ; CHM 109 ,CHM 110  Corequisite: BIO 480 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    BIO 490 - Special Topics in Modern Biology


    Course involves lectures, readings, and classroom discussion of selected topics in biology. These courses are designed as intensive study opportunities in areas of specialization not covered in depth by existing courses.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: BIO 211  and BIO 399 
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CDS 1125 - Exercise Physiology


    This course will review the effects of exercise on overall health. Topics will include the effects of weight training, calisthenics, and aerobic exercises. In-class demonstrations of various exercise activities will be performed. (Weekend intensive)
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
    Offered When Needed Weekend Intensive
  
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    NSC 102 - Intro To Biol Sciences


    A study of the fundamentals of animal life, especially man, for an appreciation of life processes and their applications to modern living.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered When Needed

Business Economics

  
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    BEC 325 - Dimensions of International Business


    A business perspective on the complexities of operating in a global business environment. After a general overview of the major environmental factors affecting the global marketplace, the course focuses on the business decision making of international business activities. Topics include cultural, social and economic factors of this environment, followed by business decision issues on global expansion, international strategies, crossborder alliances, organizational forms, international financial management, international marketing, and international human resource management.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: ECO 202 
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring

Business Law

  
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    BLW 200 - Contemporary Issues: Practical Law in Everyday Life


    An introduction to various problems and transactions which are encountered by most, or all of us, at one time or another. Topics include divorce, child custody, accident cases, vehicle and traffic violations, criminal charges, real estate transactions, bankruptcy, and other general topics.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts Offered When Needed
  
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    BLW 318 - Health Care Law and Ethics


    This course provides the participant with a general overview of US laws and regulations that commonly interface with the administration of health care organizations and providers in a rapid-fire yet thorough fashion.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    BLW 401 - Property, Security Devices, Estates, Trusts, Bankruptcy


    A study of the legal aspects of real and personal property, including bailments, the ownership and transfer of deeds, leases, and mortgages; secured transactions under the Uniform Commercial Code; insurance and suretyship; the creation, nature and kinds of trusts, wills, and estates; and bankruptcy proceedings, rights and duties, administration and discharge.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    BLW 413 - Employment Law


    A comprehensive introduction to the area of employment law. Consideration will be given to the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees throughout the employment relationship. Topics to be discussed will include common law and statutory foundations of employment law, the hiring process, terms and conditions of employment, and the termination of the employment relationship.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts
  
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    BLW 415 - International Law and Business


    This course provides an introduction to different aspects of public and private international law as they relate to business. Among the topics covered are international law and international organizations, the conflict of laws, comparative law, and international economic regulation.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 130  or permission of instructor
    Diversity, Cross-Cultural and Global Perspectives Not Liberal Arts Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    BLW 490 - Special Topics in Business Law


    An introduction to the law and the legal system as applied to the world of professional and amateur sports. The course invloves the study and review of a variety of legal doctrines (and their applications) to professional and amateur sports organizations, which includes the review and discussion of the rights and responsibilities of professional/amateur athletes as well as the many business opportunities that arise between a sports organization and its participating athletes such as sponsorships, licensing, endorsements and the media.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: BUS 130  or BUS 140  
  
  •  

    BUS 130 - The Legal Environment of Business


    An introduction to the American legal system and its relationship to the modern business environment, including an examination of basic legal concepts, principles and government regulations - emphasizing relevant areas in constitutional law, antitrust law, international law, administrative agency law, environmental law, consumer protection law, criminal law, tort law, employment law, and contract law.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    BUS 140 - Law of Agency, Business Organizations, Commercial Paper/Sales


    An intensive study of the law of agency; the law of business organizations - including their nature, creation, management, and termination and on the rights and liabilities of owners and officers; the law of commercial paper - including its nature, negotiability, transfer, and discharge, and the liabilities and rights of parties; and the law of sales - including sales contracts, related risks and transfer of title.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Not Liberal Arts Offered in Fall & Spring

Chemistry

  
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    CHM 101 - Introduction to Chemistry


    Introduction to Chemistry is a one-semester introductory course designed to help students understand the basic concepts of chemistry and master the skills necessary to succeed in the General Chemistry sequence, CHM 109 -CHM 110 . This course is designed for students who did not study Chemistry in high school or are not prepared for General Chemistry. The course will provide an introduction to chemical principles. Topics may include measurement in chemistry, atomic structure, periodic table, bonding, nomenclature, balancing chemical equations, calculations using chemical equations, and acid/base chemistry. The course includes a writing and communications requirement that relates the topics covered to a broad historical and social context. This course counts toward a general college elective, not as a chemistry elective. Decision to take CHM 101  will be determined in consultation with the academic advisor. Two lecture hours and two hours of laboratory a week for one semester.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 135 
    Offered in the Spring Semester Offered in the Summer
  
  •  

    CHM 109 - General Chemistry 1


    The fundamental principles of chemistry in the lecture and laboratory: the mole concept, stoichiometry, solution gas laws, thermodynamics, periodic law, electronic structure of the atom, molecular structure, chemical bonding, molecular forces, colligative properties, kinetics, acid/base theories, equilibrium reactions involving acids, bases and salts, electrochemistry, nuclear and coordination chemistry and chemical principles applied to the study of the descriptive chemistry elements. The laboratory work involves experimental application and practice of principles learned in class. Three lectures, one recitation hour and three hours of laboratory a week for two semesters.
    Lecture
    Credits: 5
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CHM 110 - General Chemistry 2


    The fundamental principles of chemistry in the lecture and laboratory: the mole concept, stoichiometry, solution gas laws, thermodynamics, periodic law, electronic structure of the atom, molecular structure, chemical bonding, molecular forces, colligative properties, kinetics, acid/base theories, equilibrium reactions involving acids, bases and salts, electrochemistry, nuclear and coordination chemistry and chemical principles applied to the study of the descriptive chemistry elements. The laboratory work involves experimental application and practice of principles learned in class. Three lectures, one recitation hour and three hours of laboratory a week for two semesters.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4.5
    Prerequisite: CHM 109  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CHM 111 - General Chemistry Without Lab


    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    CHM 112 - General Chemistry II Without Lab


    Lecture
    Credits: 3
  
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    CHM 114 - General Chemistry Recitation 2


    Structured problem-solving workshop to provide practice and a deeper understanding of concepts in CHM 110: General Chemistry 2.
    Lecture
    Credits: 0.5
    Co-requisite: CHM 110  
    1 hour per week for 1 semester. Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    CHM 115 - Chemistry and the Environment


    CHM 115 is an introductory lecture and laboratory course that introduces students to chemistry in the context of societal concern about the human environment. Issues for study may include resource use, ecological interrelationships, chemistry of climate change, sources and remediation of pollution, implications of biochemical and biotechnological advances for humans and the natural world, conservation and efficiency, and relationship of consumer product sources and composition to environmental concerns. In addition the methodology used in hazard and risk assessment will be examined. These topics will be presented in the context of fundamental chemical and biochemical concepts such as energy, atomic and molecular structure, the scientific laws of conservation, the cell, etc.
    Lecture and Laboratory
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CHM 120 - Chemistry of Medicine


    CHM 120 is an introductory lecture and laboratory course that introduces students to the chemistry behind medication that people take every day.  Concepts of study in this course include the basics of different body systems, the biochemical basis for the undesired effect of disease in each system, and the chemistry underlying how medications alter the undesired effect. These topics will be presented in the context of fundamental chemical and biochemical concepts such as energy, atomic and molecular structure, the scientific laws of conservation, organic and biomolecules, the cell, etc.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CHM 125 - Criminalistics Laboratory 1


    An introductory lecture and laboratory study of forensic science. The identification and individualization of such materials as glass, hair, fibers, blood and drugs through the use of chemical and physical measurements is illustrated.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CHM 130 - Chemistry of Food


    Chemistry of Food is a course examining the production, preparation, consumption, and processing of the food we eat.  The chemical composition of various foods and the processes involved with food production and storage will be presented qualitatively. The effects of certain classes of molecules on food flavor/texture/color, and other food industry applications, will also be discussed.  Students will perform laboratory experiments to examine the scientific principles underpinning the composition and analysis of food products.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
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    CHM 135 - Science and Superheroes


    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of physical science through examples and case studies drawn from science fiction, fantasy, superheroes, villains, and mythology.  Students will use basic physical science principles to critically evaluate the superhuman abilities, mythological powers, and fantastic events that are presented in books, movies, comics, and cultural mythologies.  The course content will also touch upon applications of science of importance to world issues, such as climate science, atmospheric chemistry, materials science, drugs and medicine, and nuclear chemistry. Fundamental concepts in physical science will be presented, including energy, forces and motion, atomic theory of matter, molecular structure, and scientific laws of conservation, among others.  Through lecture and group activities, students will gain an appreciation for physics and chemistry, and will develop the ability to critically assess world issues and current events that are related to science.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
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    CHM 140 - Chemistry of Emotions


    CHM 140 is an introductory lecture and laboratory course that introduces students to chemistry in the context of how their body responds to stress, love, sadness and emotions. Emotional systems are a collection of conscious experiences categorized by states of mind, external and internal reactions, and expressions. There are chemical messengers that are linked to the these emotional systems. Understanding the chemical structure of these messengers is essential to understand their functions and interactions with their target in the human body. These topics will be presented in the context of fundamental chemical and biochemical concepts such as energy, atomic and molecular structure, the scientific laws of conservation, macromolecules, the cell, etc.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CHM 145 - Fundamentals of Chemistry


    CHM 145 is a one-semester introductory course designed for students who wish to learn basic principles of chemistry at the college level. Course material will emphasize fundamental laws and theories of chemistry; will provide students a solid grounding in the vocabulary and approaches of experimental science; and will develop critical thinking and deductive reasoning skills to enable students to comprehend and evaluate basic scientific information. In conjunction with lecture instruction, the laboratory course work will provide a basic understanding of the scientific method, data analysis, and critical evaluation of results; it will also serve to reinforce the basic concepts in chemistry covered in the lecture. CHM 145 is for non-science majors to fulfill the College Core science requirement.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CHM 150 - Chemistry and the Nanoworld


    CHM 150 is an introductory lecture and laboratory course that introduces students to nanotechnology,nanomaterials, and their applications. The course combines the ideologies from many branches of science and demonstrates how the different disciplines can work together within the field of nanotechnology. This course will create an interdisciplinary science foundation through the discussion of nanotechnology, its applications in medicine, the environment and agriculture, and what nanotechnology means for society and the environment. The course also engages students in entrepreneurial learning opportunities related to nanotechnology. This class is suitable for undergraduate students with no science background and are interested in gaining a fundamental knowledge of nanotechnology, understanding current applications, and in learning about its societal implications.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester. Oral Intensive
  
  •  

    CHM 209 - Organic Chemistry I


    Organic Chemistry is the study of the structure and reactivity of the compounds of carbon.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite CHM 110 
  
  •  

    CHM 210 - Organic Chemistry II


    Organic Chemistry is the study of the structure and reactivity of the compounds of carbon.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CHM 209  or equivalent
  
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    CHM 220 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I


    Through experimentation the Organic Chemistry Laboratory validates the theory of structure and reactivity that is presented in the lecture course.
    Laboratory
    Credits: 2
    Co-requisite: CHM 209  
  
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    CHM 221 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II


    Through experimentation, the Organic Chemistry II - Laboratory validates the theory of structure and reactivity that is presented in the lecture course (CHM 210  ).
    Laboratory
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisites: CHM 209  , CHM 210  andCHM 220  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CHM 222 - Analytical Chemistry


    Analytical Chemistry is an indispensable tool in all phases of chemically related research and provides an invaluable function to the advancement of many sciences. Analytical Chemistry is one semester introductory course designed to equip students with the fundamental skills of basic analytical chemistry and instrumentation that can be transferred to various other disciplines in science. This course introduces the principles of chemistry applied to the separation, detection, identification, and quantification of samples of matter. Topics include statistics of analytical chemistry, qualitative and quantitative analysis with examples from classical methods of gravimetric and volumetric af analysis, concepts of acid base, redox, precipitation, electrochemical behavior, titrimetric, spectrophotometric, and chromatographic analysis. The laboratory experiments are composed of several mini projects, which are aimed to provide an organized principle more efficiently to the students. The sequence of laboratories is organized to deal with more interesting real world samples with biological and environmental perspective. This course is designed for both students majoring in chemistry and non chemistry disciplines such as the biological and environmental sciences.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: CHM 110  
  
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    CHM 309 - Physical Chemistry 1


    Solids, liquids and gases; solutions of non-electrolytes; elementary thermodynamics; kinetics; homogeneous equilibrium; solutions of electrolytes; conductance; electromotive force; deviations from ideal behavior; thermochemistry; heterogeneous equilibrium and the Phase Rule, introductory statistical mechanics, modern theories of atomic and molecular structure.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CHM 109 -CHM 110 , PHY 101 -PHY 102 , and MTH 232 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CHM 310 - Physical Chemistry 2


    Advanced spectroscopies; computational chemistry; partition functions; statistical mechanics; phase equilibria; kinetic molecular theory; transition state theory; chemical mechanisms.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CHM 109 , CHM 110 , CHM 309  , PHY 101 , PHY 102  and MTH 232  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    CHM 311 - Physical Chemistry Lab 1


    Physical chemical measurements and determinations.
    Laboratory
    Credits: 2
    Corequisite: CHM 309 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    CHM 312 - Physical Chemistry Lab 2


    Physical chemical measurements and determinations.
    Laboratory
    Credits: 1.5
    Corequisite: CHM 310  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CHM 320 - Chemical Synthesis Laboratory


    A survey of selected techniques employed in the synthesis of organic, inorganic and organometallic compounds, natural products and polymers. This course in preparative methods also includes physical and analytical methods associated with the isolation and characterization of the target compounds.
    Laboratory
    Credits: 2
    PRerequisite CHM 110 
  
  •  

    CHM 321 - Biochemistry I


    This course is the first part of a detailed examination of biomolecules, the interactions among such moieties, and consideration of primary metabolic pathways. Biochemistry I is an introduction to the chemistry of living cells and consequently focuses upon subject matter in biochemistry, organic chemistry (as it relates directly to biological systems), and structural biology. Emphasis is placed initially upon protein structure and enzyme kinetics. This course will also lay the theoretical groundwork for Biochemistry II, in which there will be a detailed examination of nucleic acids and how small molecules are used endogenously by living systems in both metabolic and catabolic pathways.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CHM 209  and CHM 210 , and Corequisite CHM 420 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    CHM 322 - Instrumental Analysis


    Theory and application of instrumental methods of quantitative and qualitative analyses with emphasis on electrolytic, optical, and chromatographic techniques.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CHM 222 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CHM 323 - Biochemical Methods Laboratory


    This laboratory course provides a deeper understanding of how to isolate, purify, characterize, and quantify biological molecules. The course exposes students to the various chromatographic methods for purification, spectrometric techniques for identification and quantification, chemical techniques for fluorescent tagging, and advanced spectroscopic methods for analysis.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1.5
    Co-requisite: CHM 321  or BIO 419  
    3 hours per week for 1 semester. Offered in the Spring Semester.
  
  •  

    CHM 327 - Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry


    A foundational course in the concepts and chemical systems of inorganic chemistry with particular emphasis on the roles of metals in biochemistry. Topics may include origin of the elements, nuclear chemistry, chemical periodicity, descriptive chemistry of the elements, simple bonding models, ionic and chrystalline solids, coordination chemistry, crystal field theory, ligand substitution reactions, electron transfer reactions, and select applications to the subfield of bioinorganic chemistry.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CHM 109 -CHM 110  or permission of department chair
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    CHM 328 - Inorganic, Organometallic, and Nanomaterials Laboratory


    This foundation laboratory course focuses on the synthesis, characterization, properties, and reactivity of inorganic and organometallic compounds as well as inorganic nanoscale materials. The theoretical basis for the relevant synthetic methods, spectroscopic analysis, and physical properties is also examined.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1.5
    Co-requisite: CHM 327  
    3 hours per week for 1 semester.
    Offered in the Spring Semester.
    Oral Intensive
  
  •  

    CHM 400 - Nanoscience


    This course introduces the chemistry of nanoscale systems and the properties of materials at the nanoscale dimension to advanced undergraduates in the physical sciences. Topics may include: theory and application of characterization and fabrication methods/instrumentation, bonding and structure in bluk materials and at surfaces, physical chemistry of nanoscale materials (quantum theory and thermodynamics), carbon nanomaterials, supramolecular chemistry, polymers, synthesis/functionalization methods, and nanoscience in biological systems. The course will also address the technological and social issues associated with nanoscience and its applications.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CHM 309  or Permission of Department Chair
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    CHM 401 - Advanced Organic Chemistry


    Organic Chemistry is the study of the structure and reactivity of the compounds of carbon.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CHM 210 
  
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    CHM 409 - Computational Chemistry


    Computational chemistry is a hands-on, virtual exploration of chemical structure, spectroscopy, equilibrium and reactivity through computer models. Physical chemistry concepts and modern computational methods will be used in this course as a means to understand and predict experimental results.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CHM 309 -CHM 310  
  
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    CHM 420 - Biochemistry Laboratory


    See department chairperson for schedule. Laboratory course devoted to the study of the biochemistry and physiology of living systems; utilizes the methods of spectrophotometry, chromatography, polarimetry, electrophoresis, radioisotope methodology and other modern techniques.
    Laboratory
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite: CHM 210 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CHM 422 - Biochemistry 2


    A study of the relationship between the three-dimensional configuration of proteins and their mechanism of action. Areas of concentration include enzymes; blood proteins; muscle, nervous and connective tissues; hormones; and antigen-antibody interactions. Course of study also includes protein synthesis and the central position proteins hold in the architecture and functioning of living matter.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CHM 321 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    CHM 424 - Advanced Topics in Biochemistry


    This advanced course examines current and advanced topics in the field of biochemistry. Students will study these advanced topics in-depth using primary literature, including application to pharmaceuticals, drug treatment, toxicology, and/or clinical methods, with an emphasis on new and advanced techniques for imaging biological systems in vivo and in vitro. This course will expand students’ knowledge scope in the field of biochemistry and connect topics in biochemistry to their future careers and to society.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Co-requisites: CHM 321   or BIO 419 
    Offered in the Fall and Spring Semester.
  
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    CHM 425 - Chemical Safety


    This course focuses on safety, health, and ethical issues as they relate to the teaching and safe operation of a chemistry laboratory. The course provides safety training in various aspects of chemistry laboratory work from the perspective of conducting a grade/high school laboratory, including experiment selection and evaluation, awareness of laboratory hazards, personal protection and dress, rules of behavior, use of MSDS, chemical purchase and storage, incompatibilities and waste removal considerations, safety inspections audits, record keeping, and emergency response. The course will also be suitable for students planning to pursue careers in an industrial laboratory setting. The course provides for a venue for student practice, and testing of learned material and for evaluation of students’ performance.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisites: Junior/Senior standing and completion of CHM 109 -CHM 110  and CHM 209 -CHM 210 .
  
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    CHM 427 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry


    A detailed and advanced theoretical examination of the concepts and chemical systems of inorganic chemistry including atomic structure, bonding theory, periodic law, symmetry and group theory, acid-base theory, molecular orbital theory, reaction mechanism and factors affecting chemical activity, the crystalline and solid state. Coordination chemistry and chemistry of the elements are also examined based on previous background course work.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CHM 309 -CHM 310 , CHM 327 
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CHM 430 - Internship in Chemistry


    Student participation in an off-campus, supervised work experience related to chemistry with regular reporting to an assigned faculty member. Written report relating this work experience to the student’s course of studies will normally be expected.
    Internship
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
    Department Consent Required
  
  •  

    CHM 441 - Research 1


    Research under the supervision of a faculty member. Open only to a limited number of selected students.
    Independent Study
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisites: CHM 310 , CHM 322 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
    Department Consent Required
  
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    CHM 442 - Research 2


    Research under the supervision of a faculty member. Open only to a limited number of selected students.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite: CHM 310  & CHM 322 
    Offered When Needed
  
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    CHM 450 - Seminar


    An integration of the fundamental principles of the major courses through the survey of selected topics in which the use of periodicals and abstracts in research will be stressed. Presentations will be made by each student.
    Seminar
    Credits: 2
    Prerequisite Senior Status
    Open to Seniors Only
    Oral Intensive
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CHM 491 - Special Topics


    Special topics courses are developed to cover emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the main curriculum. Special topics course offerings can vary from semester to semester. Course description will be determined based on specific subtopic that will be offered at a given semester.
    Lecture
    Credits: 1
  
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    CHM 492 - Special Topics


    Special topics courses are developed to cover emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the main curriculum. Special topics course offerings can vary from semester to semester. Course description will be determined based on specific subtopic that will be offered at a given semester.
    Lecture
    Credits: 2
    Offered Fall, Winter, Spring & Summer
  
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    CHM 493 - Special Topics


    Special topics courses are developed to cover emerging issues or specialized content not represented in the main curriculum. Special topics course offerings can vary from semester to semester. Course description will be determined based on specific subtopic that will be offered at a given semester.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Fall, Winter, Spring & Summer

Computer Science

  
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    CS 140 - Computers, Technology and Society


    This courses provides students with a firm foundation in computers and technology and enables them to become intelligent, ethical and responsible users of technology. Students explore the various aspects of computer systems to develop a comprehensive understanding of how computers operate as well as an appreciation of their pervasive influence on society. This course lays the basis for further study in computer science. Not for major credit. Weekly Laboratory.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered Fall, Spring & Summer
  
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    CS 142 - Website Design


    This course introduces the student to the fundamental concepts of networking, the internet and website design and development. Topics include HTTP protocol, client server relationship, mark-up languages, browsers, dynamic web page development, and user interface design. Assignments require programming in languages that support web application development. Not for major credit. Weekly Laboratory
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    CS 144 - Introduction to Game Development


    This course is a hands-on introduction to Computer Science and the art of game design and development. The course covers the fundamentals of game development - from concept creation and initial design to implementation, testing, and marketing of the finished product. Students gain hands-on experience creating a game using a professional game engine and other software tools. The course emphasizes the elements of critical thinking, problem solving and solution design, professional software development and business ethics. Not for major credit. Weekly Laboratory.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CS 146 - Introduction to Robotics


    This course is a hands-on introduction to Computer Science through Robotics. The course covers the fundamentals of autonomous mobile robotics, including hardware and software design. Students gain hands-on experience creating an autonomous robot along with various software tools. The course emphasizes the elements of critical thinking, problem solving and solution design, and professional software development and business ethics. Weekly laboratory.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CS 148 - Data Science and Society


    This course will provide students with a foundation of data science and enable them to use data responsibly and ethically. It would focus on techniques used to understand, manipulate, visualize, and extract insight from data. Students will work with a variety of real-life data sets. This course lays the basis for further study in data science, and for exploring how data in multiple forms and settings impacts our day-to-day life. Students will be better able to understand the foundations of data science, and bring that awareness to multiple disciplines and professions.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CS 201 - Computer Science I


    This course provides an introduction to problem solving, data representation, algorithm design, programming and application. Programs requiring a variety of control structures and data structures will be assigned for computer solutions. Ethical and social issues relating to computing will be discusses. Weekly Laboratory.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CS 202 - Computer Science II


    This course provides an introduction to advanced programming techniques, data structuring and encapsulation techniques. This course emphasizes modern design principles. The use of these principles to achieve clarity and ease of de-bugging is required in the programming assignments. Ethical and social issues relating to computing are discussed. Weekly Laboratory.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: CS 201 
    Co-requisite: MTH 231  
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
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    CS 231 - Programming in a UNIX Environment


    This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of the UNIX operating system and to the C programming language. Topics include UNIX command line operation, basic I/O, file systems, interprocess communication, and scripting. The course covers certain fundamental software development tools. Students learn the C programming language and use it to implement various, non-trivial, programs.
    Laboratory
    Credits: 4
    Co-requisite: CS 202  
  
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    CS 301 - Data Structures and Algorithms


    This course covers abstract data types such as stacks, queues, lists, trees and graphs, and the design of data structures and algorithms to implement them. The use of these data structures to design solutions to problems is emphasized.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 202 . Corequisite: MTH 310 .
    Offered in Fall & Spring
  
  •  

    CS 311 - Computer Architecture and Organization


    This course is an introduction to the architecture, organization and logic design of digital computers. Topics include a review of number systems, analysis and design of digital circuits, computer architecture, CPU organization and operation, advanced CPU implementation techniques, hierarchical memory system design, topics in input-output design, and assembly language programming. The interdependence between computer hardware, operating systems, and programming language compilers is emphasized throughout the course. Weekly hardware and software laboratory.
    Lecture
    Credits: 4
    Prerequisite: CS 201  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
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    CS 315 - Software Security


    This course provides students with a broad familiarity with security concepts pertaining to secure software development. Students gain hands-on skills and theoretical knowledge by applying these concepts to actual software development. Students learn how to use existing software security APIs when writing software. A number of database security issues are also discussed. Students learn about malware threats that malicious software or hackers can inject into vulnerable software and become familiar with testing and analysis tools used by software developers to close vulnerabilities.The course also provides a brief overview of cryptography and network security.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 301 
    Co-requisite: CS 321 
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CS 321 - Database Design & Implementation


    This course introduces the design, implementation and use of database management systems. Topics include: database system architecture, conceptual and logical database design, data models, normalization, relational query languages, database security, data warehousing, data mining and underlying social and ethical issues. Students design and implement a database system application.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 202  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
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    CS 331 - Theory of Programming Languages


    This course covers the design and organization of higher-level programming languages: processing, datatypes and data flow, control structures, program units, storage management, binding strategies, language design criteria, and formal language definition.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 231  &  CS 301  
    Offered in the Fall Semester Alternate Years
  
  •  

    CS 364 - Introduction to Data Science


    The course covers a broad selection of data science methods. Topics include data collection, integration, management, modeling, analysis, visualization, and prediction. Students will acquire a working knowledge of data science through hands-on projects and case studies in a variety of domains. Issues of ethics will be discussed.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 201  
    Co-requisite: MTH 270  or MTH 432  or ECO 309  or PSY 323  or BUS 210  
    Offered in the Fall Semester
  
  •  

    CS 401 - Algorithms for Computational Science


    This course provides an introduction to algorithms and their application in Computational Science. The main objective of the course is to develop students’ algorithmic thinking and problem solving skills by exploring and implementing algorithms that are used in solutions to a variety of problems of modern significance in Bioinformatics, Molecular Biology, Computational Chemistry and Physics, Astronomy and other areas of Computational Science.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 301 
  
  •  

    CS 408 - Automata and Formal Languages


    This course is an introduction to the theoretical foundations of Computer Science. Topics include regular languages and finite state machines, context-free languages and push-down automata, Turing machines and recursive function theory, and undecidability. Even though the material is mathematically rigorous and abstract in nature, the concepts find numerous applications throughout many sub-fields of Computer Science, and form the basis for such important issues as the design of computer hardware, compilers, and operating systems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: MTH 310  
    Offered in the Fall Semester Alternate Years
  
  •  

    CS 409 - Cryptography


    This course introduces the theory and application of cryptography - a fundamental area of Computer Science and Mathematics at the core of modern software and hardware security. Covering a range of cryptographic topics and algorithms along with the mathematical background necessary to be able to argue formally about their complexity, efficiency, and correctness; the course also offers a hands-on approach to better understand how cryptographic algorithms are designed. Students learn how to write secure software by using cryptographic APIs already implemented in most well-known programming platforms. Reading assignments and hands-on labs further teach students the weaknesses and strengths of different cryptographic algorithms and implementations.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CS 301  and MTH 310  
    Offered in the Spring Semester
  
  •  

    CS 411 - Advanced Computer Architecture and Organization


    The course presents a detailed study of efficient CPU design and its integration into a computer system so that performance and cost are optimized. Advanced processor implementation techniques such as pipelining, superscalar operation, and hyperthreading. The course discusses multicore CPUs along with their cost/performance tradeoffs. The structure and operation of the memory hierarchy, memory design approaches, I/O structures, and the mutual impact of processor, compiler and operating system designs will be considered.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 311  
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    CS 412 - Program Analysis for Security


    This course introduces students to the theory of program analysis for security. It covers a variety of program analysis techniques used during software design, implementation, testing, debugging, and modification so that students understand software systems, their properties, and security problems that may arise. The course offers hands-on experiences that show students how to implement security analysis and how to use commercial tools to detect the security problems of any program.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 321  
    Offered during Special Sessions
  
  •  

    CS 413 - Cloud Computing and Cloud Security and Privacy


    This course demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of different solutions in cloud computing to overcome new vectors of attacks that can affect a company’s infrastructure, communication networks, data, and services. This course also covers a broad range of topics and methodologies on privacy and security issues and approaches related to cloud computing, including trust, risk, forensics and legal aspects. Students also have the opportunity to explore the latest open source cloud based technologies related to cloud security development.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 315 
    Offered When Needed
  
  •  

    CS 416 - Big Data Security


    The course introduces cyber threats attacks, challenges and security analyses in the Dig Data Era. As more and more companies are committed in this transformation are using many open source frameworks tools, such as, Hadoop for data discovery, data science, and big data projects.  The course covers major impediments to big data moving into production, especially for those built around Hadoop due to security concerns.  In addition, the course covers latest research security analyses and solutions to improve some of the Dig Data systems security threats.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: CS 301  and CS 321  
    Offered in Special Sessions
  
  •  

    CS 421 - Advanced Topics in Database Systems


    This course covers problems and techniques involved in the design and implementation of database systems. Topics include physical storage management and indexing structures, query processing and optimization, transaction processing, concurrency control, database recovery and distributed database systems.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 321  
    Offered Spring Semester Alternate Years
  
  •  

    CS 431 - Compiler Design


    This course covers the principles and techniques of language translation: finite automata and lexical analysis, parsing of context-free languages, symbol tables, storage administration, error diagnosis, introductory optimization and code generation techniques.
    Lecture
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisite: CS 311 , CS 331  
    Offered When Needed
 

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